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Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs

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Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2011, 19:19
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Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs rather than facing low
salaries in the city.











Answer:
Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs rather than face low salaries in the city.



My question:
Would this work?

Many teachers choose seeking employment in the suburbs rather than facing low salaries in the city.

I guess is is more correct to say "choose to" ? does the verb choose have to be followed by "to"?
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Re: manhattan gmat SC guide basic parallelism [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2011, 20:29
"choose to " is the correct usage. You "choose to do something" rather than "choose doing something"

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Re: manhattan gmat SC guide basic parallelism [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2011, 03:23
pinchharmonic wrote:
Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs rather than facing low
salaries in the city.











Answer:
Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs rather than face low salaries in the city.



My question:
Would this work?

Many teachers choose seeking employment in the suburbs rather than facing low salaries in the city.

I guess is is more correct to say "choose to" ? does the verb choose have to be followed by "to"?


Hi,

Nice question. Infact I had seen more than 1 question testing these concepts on the real GMAT exam (on my previous attempt). The trick here is to realize the difference in usage of Gerunds and infinitives.

Using a gerund suggests that you are referring to real activities or experiences.
Eg. The reporter likes living in New York. (i.e. he lives in NY and likes it).

Using an infinitive suggests that you are talking about potential or possible activities of experiences.
Eg. The reporter likes to live in New York whenever he works in the US. (i.e. he likes the option or possibility of living in NY whenever he comes to US).

Hope this helps.
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Re: Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs [#permalink] New post 29 Oct 2011, 04:01
Well, I think the problem here is "rather than do sth."
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Re: manhattan gmat SC guide basic parallelism [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2011, 10:26
immaculatesahai wrote:
pinchharmonic wrote:
Hi,

Nice question. Infact I had seen more than 1 question testing these concepts on the real GMAT exam (on my previous attempt). The trick here is to realize the difference in usage of Gerunds and infinitives.

Using a gerund suggests that you are referring to real activities or experiences.
Eg. The reporter likes living in New York. (i.e. he lives in NY and likes it).

Using an infinitive suggests that you are talking about potential or possible activities of experiences.
Eg. The reporter likes to live in New York whenever he works in the US. (i.e. he likes the option or possibility of living in NY whenever he comes to US).

Hope this helps.


Hi, great point. I never thought of the difference between gerunds and infinitives. But to clarify, are you implying that the infinitive suggests some doubt, whereas the gerund doesn't?

What if we had

"The reporter would like living in New York"
"The report would like to live in New York"

Both emphasize some doubt, but I agree the first does sound stranger than the first.
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Re: Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2011, 10:33
Also, its best to avoid -ing verb forms as much as possible unless the action in question is happenning in present continuous....
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Re: Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2011, 12:36
A little background: verb forms are different parts of speech based on verbs. For instance, the gerund choosing, the participle choosing used as a modifier, the verb choose, the infinitive to choose, are all different verb forms.

When SC answers offer you a choice among verb forms, the question tests either parallelism or idioms. (I haven't counted, but I think that choices among verb forms rarely turn out to require attention to both parallelism and idioms.)

The question you refer to was--in it's original form--a question about parallelism. As another commenter, uh, commented the parallel marker rather than means you need to make two logically comparable elements structurally similar.

OK, but what about your alternative sentence, Many teachers choose seeking employment in the suburbs rather than facing low salaries in the city?

I don't think that that is idiomatic. My ear says that it's fine to choose to do something (choose to seek employment) or to choose a noun (choose a job search), but that it's not fine to choose a simple gerund (choose seeking).

A couple of important caveats: First, the GMAT is never wrong about the GMAT, including idioms. If you show me a right answer that includes choose+simple gerund, I'm convinced. Second, verb-form idioms vary with forms of English, in a way that many other idioms do not. In particular, some uses of -ing words (whether continuous verbs, participles, gerunds) that are perfectly natural in Indian English are awkward and unidiomatic in American English. Since GMAC has recently announced that they no longer test "US centric" idioms, I'd be surprised to see choose+simple gerund tested. That's just my hunch about what "US centric" might mean, though. It's not GMAC's position, or even Manhattan GMAT's guess.

Here's Stacey Koprince's excellent blog on the subject, http://www.manhattangmat.com/blog/index.php/2011/09/21/update-on-the-gmat-changes-from-larry-rudner/.
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Joined: 03 Aug 2011
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Location: United States
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Re: Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs [#permalink] New post 31 Oct 2011, 14:56
MichaelS wrote:
A little background: verb forms are different parts of speech based on verbs. For instance, the gerund choosing, the participle choosing used as a modifier, the verb choose, the infinitive to choose, are all different verb forms.

When SC answers offer you a choice among verb forms, the question tests either parallelism or idioms. (I haven't counted, but I think that choices among verb forms rarely turn out to require attention to both parallelism and idioms.)

The question you refer to was--in it's original form--a question about parallelism. As another commenter, uh, commented the parallel marker rather than means you need to make two logically comparable elements structurally similar.

OK, but what about your alternative sentence, Many teachers choose seeking employment in the suburbs rather than facing low salaries in the city?

I don't think that that is idiomatic. My ear says that it's fine to choose to do something (choose to seek employment) or to choose a noun (choose a job search), but that it's not fine to choose a simple gerund (choose seeking).

A couple of important caveats: First, the GMAT is never wrong about the GMAT, including idioms. If you show me a right answer that includes choose+simple gerund, I'm convinced. Second, verb-form idioms vary with forms of English, in a way that many other idioms do not. In particular, some uses of -ing words (whether continuous verbs, participles, gerunds) that are perfectly natural in Indian English are awkward and unidiomatic in American English. Since GMAC has recently announced that they no longer test "US centric" idioms, I'd be surprised to see choose+simple gerund tested. That's just my hunch about what "US centric" might mean, though. It's not GMAC's position, or even Manhattan GMAT's guess.

Here's Stacey Koprince's excellent blog on the subject, http://www.manhattangmat.com/blog/index.php/2011/09/21/update-on-the-gmat-changes-from-larry-rudner/.


michael, thanks for the great explanation. And yes, I randomly thought up the choose+seeking, not something I saw on a sample question or on Manhattan GMAT. Nevertheless is there a hard rule on this? Does it depend on the verb "choose?"

In the above case we have the verb form "choose", action verb, followed by either an infinitive or a gerund, and picking the infinitive is more correct. However, it seems I can't just indiscriminately apply that logic, ie. action verb + infinitive over gerund. Maybe I'm missing something here as choose may be a different type of verb?

I was thinking of other cases like the below where the meaning is totally different.


He laughs holding his belly
He laughs to hold his belly
Re: Many teachers choose to seek employment in the suburbs   [#permalink] 31 Oct 2011, 14:56
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