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Medical research finding s are customarily not made public

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Medical research finding s are customarily not made public [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 17:17
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A
B
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D
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75% (02:59) correct 25% (04:02) wrong based on 8 sessions
25. Medical research finding s are customarily not made public prior to their publication in a medical journal that has had them reviewed by a panel of experts in a process called peer review. It is claimed that this practice delays public access to potentially beneficial information that, in extreme instances, could save lives. Yet prepublication peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching a public that is ill equipped to \evaluate medical claims on its own. Therefore, waiting until a medical journal has published the research finding s that have passed peer review is the price that must be paid to protect the public from making decisions based on possibly substandard research.

The argument assumes that

(A) unless medical research findings are brought to peer review by a medical journal, peer review will not occur

(B) anyone who does not serve on medical review panel does not have the necessary knowledge and expertise to evaluate medical research finding

(C) the general public does not have access to the medical journals in which research findings are published.

(D) all medical research findings are subjected to prepublication peer review

(E) peer review panels are sometimes subject to political and professional pressures that can make their judgments less than impartial
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 18:00
I'd go with B on this one. The argument is that research findings can potentially harm "a public that is ill equipped to evaluate medical claims on its own". In order for the public to be ill equipped, we have to assume that any person not working on the review panel will not have the necessary knowledge and expertise to evaluate medical research finding. If we negate the assumption and say that just about anyone can evaluate the research findings, then the argument that the public is ill equipped is shattered.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 20:29
Geethu wrote:
I would go with D here.

Let me try to disprove D. If the conclusion were that the public WAS protected from potentially harmful information in medical research findings then D would be the assumption because it would be REQUIRED that all such medical research be subject to prepublication peer review. However, the argument simply says that the prepublication peer review is a condition to prevent harm to happen. Therefore, I don't believe D has any bearing on the argument and conclusion.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 20:47
hallelujah1234 wrote:
how abt a

Halle, I believe your answer actually weakens the argument. Let me try to prove it. Let's say that medical research findings are not brought to peer review by a medical journal, then the peer review will not occur. Yet, the argument says that peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching a public that is ill equipped. Then what about those findings that are NOT brought to the panel? Will those not harm the public? Hence, can we say that peer review is the only way to prevent... A cannot therefore be assumed
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 20:59
I'll go with B.

Let me try to disprove A. The main point of the argument is that 'public has to wait until a peer review is done'. Let us negate A and say that peer review will occur even without the help of medical journal. But that does not help. Public still has to wait for the information even if the peer review is done without medical journal's assistance.

Now try and negate B. If people other than those who serve on medical review panel have the expertise to evaluate medical research finding then such a panel is not essential and hence no need for public to wait for the information.

Last edited by Skeletor on 25 Mar 2004, 04:53, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 21:15
Paul, I agree with your reasoning to an extent. However, I dont like the word "ANY" in choice B, there are certaintly those who are not on the review board, but do know a thing or two about medicine. I would go with D. If we assume that not all medical finding go through peer review then the statement that "the price that public must pay to avoid potentially substandard research" is wrong, since public will receive some sustandard research. Therefore, ALL publications must go through peer review. Thats my take on it.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2004, 21:21
Paul wrote:
hallelujah1234 wrote:
how abt a

Halle, I believe your answer actually weakens the argument. Let me try to prove it. Let's say that medical research findings are not brought to peer review by a medical journal, then the peer review will not occur. Yet, the argument says that peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching a public that is ill equipped. Then what about those findings that are NOT brought to the panel? Will those not harm the public? Hence, can we say that peer review is the only way to prevent... A cannot therefore be assumed


Given: Yet prepublication peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching a public that is ill equipped to \evaluate medical claims on its own.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 05:41
I would go with C on this one...If the general public does have access to the medical journal then the argument does not stand. So it is assumed that they dop not have access to them and so they will have to wait until they are publishe in other media for them to read......
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 06:34
monarc wrote:
I would go with C on this one...If the general public does have access to the medical journal then the argument does not stand. So it is assumed that they dop not have access to them and so they will have to wait until they are publishe in other media for them to read......

They should have access to the journals in order for the argument to stand. However, they may NOT have access to the findings themselves before they are published
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 06:41
lvb9th wrote:
Paul, I agree with your reasoning to an extent. However, I dont like the word "ANY" in choice B, there are certaintly those who are not on the review board, but do know a thing or two about medicine. I would go with D. If we assume that not all medical finding go through peer review then the statement that "the price that public must pay to avoid potentially substandard research" is wrong, since public will receive some sustandard research. Therefore, ALL publications must go through peer review. Thats my take on it.

Nice lvb9th, it's is logically convincing... However, the word "potentially" does not encompass ALL substandard research. It still can mean that the public can receive at least some substandard research
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 07:01
PAUL:

Findings are always published in the Journals and so Access to the journals would always imply that they have access to the Findings.
Well, I think it is time for the Official answer: KPADMA we are waiting for you...
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 07:08
One heck of a discussion. I will go with B on this one. I need not explain as Paul is putting lot of effort.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 07:35
monarc wrote:
PAUL:

Findings are always published in the Journals and so Access to the journals would always imply that they have access to the Findings.
Well, I think it is time for the Official answer: KPADMA we are waiting for you...

Ok, let's say that the public DOES have access to the medical journals, does that have an impact on the safety of the public? I don't think so because once the findings actually get published in those medical journals, then this is happening AFTER the fact.
The first sentence says: Medical research findings are customarily not made public prior to their publication in a medical journal. This means that the findings are actually NOT in the medical journal when they are reviewed by the panel. What would have been an assumption would be that the actual findings, prior to their publication in medical journals, are not accessible to the public
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 07:42
PAUL:

I agree with you now.I realize my mistake. Yes, the answer shpould be B.

You are so confident on this CR.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 07:51
monarc wrote:
PAUL:

I agree with you now.I realize my mistake. Yes, the answer shpould be B.

You are so confident on this CR.

:) Hope my answer is right. I'm just trying to analyze CR in excruciating detail as mentor Akhamai once taught me to. Being able to disprove all other answers will help you improve your understanding
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2004, 08:42
Ok, I also choose B.
But, the official answer is A.

hallelujah1234: What reason prompted you to choose A
and disregard B.
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Re: Medical research finding s are customarily not made public [#permalink] New post 15 Dec 2011, 04:13
This is from an LSAT test. The OA is (A).

But can someone please explain why (B) is wrong?

Here's my reasoning with (B):

What if there were another institution (besides the review panel) that possessed the necessary knowledge to review the findings and that would be much more time efficient? Then the conclusion of the argument that it is necessary to wait for the journal to post the findings reviewed by the panel would be weakened as the second (and arguable better) alternative to review the findings would exist.

Thanks.
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Re: Medical research finding s are customarily not made public [#permalink] New post 15 Dec 2011, 07:05
kpadma wrote:
25. Medical research finding s are customarily not made public prior to their publication in a medical journal that has had them reviewed by a panel of experts in a process called peer review. It is claimed that this practice delays public access to potentially beneficial information that, in extreme instances, could save lives. Yet prepublication peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching a public that is ill equipped to \evaluate medical claims on its own. Therefore, waiting until a medical journal has published the research findings that have passed peer review is the price that must be paid to protect the public from making decisions based on possibly substandard research.

The argument assumes that

(A) unless medical research findings are brought to peer review by a medical journal, peer review will not occur

(B) anyone who does not serve on medical review panel does not have the necessary knowledge and expertise to evaluate medical research finding


I chose A. Here is my reasoning when negate A:

If medical research findings are not brought to peer review by a medical journal, peer review WILL STILL OCCUR. (I transform unless into if not) => this truly weaken the conclusion because the research findings do not need to wait peer review passed.

How about choice B?
nonameee wrote:
This is from an LSAT test. The OA is (A).

But can someone please explain why (B) is wrong?

Here's my reasoning with (B):

What if there were another institution (besides the review panel) that possessed the necessary knowledge to review the findings and that would be much more time efficient? Then the conclusion of the argument that it is necessary to wait for the journal to post the findings reviewed by the panel would be weakened as the second (and arguable better) alternative to review the findings would exist.

Thanks.


CONCLUSION: Therefore, waiting until a medical journal has published the research findings that have passed peer review is the price that must be paid to protect the public from making decisions based on possibly substandard research.

I see your reasoning has one flaws here. How you sure the other people who belong to other organizations have knowledge and expertise in the field CAN REVIEW MUCH MORE TIME EFFICIENT. Why not they review longer? We do not know. This is your flaw. You create another assumption to qualify again your reasoning.

To answer assumption question. We have right to find only one assumption. Do not make more than 1 bridge from the premise to the conclusion.
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Re: Medical research finding s are customarily not made public [#permalink] New post 15 Dec 2011, 07:10
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You create another assumption to qualify again your reasoning.

To answer assumption question. We have right to find only one assumption. Do not make more than 1 bridge from the premise to the conclusion.


OK, it sounds reasonable. Thanks for you reply.
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Re: Medical research finding s are customarily not made public [#permalink] New post 15 Dec 2011, 07:23
Tough one......
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Re: Medical research finding s are customarily not made public   [#permalink] 15 Dec 2011, 07:23
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