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More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel

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More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 07:59
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More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump", as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2005, 20:22
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Paul wrote:
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump", as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


Late response but B it is.

Idiom: From..to another..

By POE, C, D E is out.

A sounds like genes can jump "while" pearls are moving, which doesn't make sense
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 08:13
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I vote for B.
Anyway strong hesitations betwwen as and like for this one...
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 09:13
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we need to show the likeness between the way genes jump and the way pearls (can) move. these are not similar things; we are just comparing one aspect to (the similar of) another. that being said, genes behave similar to pearl's but not equal to pearl's. 'Like' to show similarity; 'as' to show one-to-one relationship.

B is the best.

consider:

genes can jump like pearls
and,
genes can jump as pearls do

which one is better?
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 09:50
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'as pearls do' or 'like pearls do' suggest that this happens in reality.

The sentence gives a hypothetical example. So B.
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Old thread: new questions [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2005, 13:29
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dj wrote:
we need to show the likeness between the way genes jump and the way pearls (can) move. these are not similar things; we are just comparing one aspect to (the similar of) another. that being said, genes behave similar to pearl's but not equal to pearl's. 'Like' to show similarity; 'as' to show one-to-one relationship.

B is the best.

consider:

genes can jump like pearls
and,
genes can jump as pearls do

which one is better?


The ans. is B but I am still not clear abt. the reason. The OE in OG does not mention anything abt. "reality".

Is it because the “pearls moving mysteriously…â€
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 30 Nov 2005, 07:54
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TeHCM wrote:
Paul wrote:
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump", as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another


Late response but B it is.

A sounds like genes can jump "while" pearls are moving, which doesn't make sense


The "while" aspect is important. I agree that it *normally* should be "as" ( http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxlikevs.html ), but using "as moving" here introduces a weird impression that pearls are moving simultaneously with genes jumping.

But I said A too before seeing the OA. :?
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2008, 08:28
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Late response, but the reason B is correct is that there is no verb after "pearls." So why even consider the "as"? The construction is normally:

subject+verb + as + subject+verb

Usually, when you make comparisons using adjectives, the "is" is implied. For example:

Tom is as tall as he (is)
you don't need to add "is" because it is implied.

However, when you compare 2 clauses, both clauses will have their subjects and verbs explicitely written, THEN you can use your "as." But in our given problem, "do" is not written, therefore it can't be implied. It is only the linking verb that can be implied, but that is used only when you use adjectives as the base of comparison. No verb can be omitted for the reason that it is implied. Since we only have the subject "pearl" with no verb following the subject, "like" would be more appropriate.

hope this helps.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Oct 2004, 18:40
OA is B
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2008, 22:18
Paul wrote:
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump", as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


B for comparision of phrases.

A) "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is a phrase so "as" is not correct.
B) "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is a phrase so "like" is better fits here.
C) "one necklace to another" is required.
D) "like" is not good for the comparision between clauses.
E) "one to another" is required.

So B for Buffet is the richest billinoire.
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2008, 01:05
I'll go for B. You are comparing one noun to another and introducing "like" does exactly that.
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2008, 23:55
Guys, I have a more basic issue here. Is "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" a clause or a phrase ? Why ?
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2008, 11:17
Vavali wrote:
I'll go for B. You are comparing one noun to another and introducing "like" does exactly that.


Exactly. We are comparing "genes" to "pearls" i.e. Genes are like Pearls ...

Also, in order to use "as" the following structure must be in place:
Genes can "jump" as pearls can "jump" = sub. verb as sub. verb
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2008, 13:09
farend wrote:
Guys, I have a more basic issue here. Is "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" a clause or a phrase ? Why ?

Yes. This is called a noun phrase or more precisely, a participial phrase. The noun is "pearl" and what follows is a phrase which is being introduced by a present participle "moving". Participial phrases always act as adjective to the noun they intend to modify. Note that there is no verb involved so this is not a clause.
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2008, 04:24
Paul wrote:
farend wrote:
Guys, I have a more basic issue here. Is "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" a clause or a phrase ? Why ?

Yes. This is called a noun phrase or more precisely, a participial phrase. The noun is "pearl" and what follows is a phrase which is being introduced by a present participle "moving". Participial phrases always act as adjective to the noun they intend to modify. Note that there is no verb involved so this is not a clause.



Paul;
There is a subject (pearls) and a verb(moving). Doesn't the verb form "moving" helps it in qualifying as a clause ? Sorry if my doubt sounds silly.
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2008, 07:24
'As' is used to compare clauses (should have a subj/verb). So in choices A, C, and E can anyone comment on if the highlighted portions qualify as clauses ?

Paul wrote:
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can "jump", as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.

A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to othersD) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2008, 09:24
farend, I would suggest you read the first paragraph and example of the below link:
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/phrases.htm#noun

As you will see, noun phrases are usually contiguous to the noun they intend to modify and will act as adjective.

For instance, take sentence starting with "pearl":

Pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another --> The section in blue is a noun/participial phrase and does not constitute a complete sentence. You can reconstruct this sentence to read "like moving pearls" and you will see the role of the participial phrase acting as adjective. Should someone use that sentence as a stand alone one, one cannot help but wonder: And then what? What happens after?

On the other hand, a complete sentence, or clause, would be better constructed as follows:

Pearls move mysteriously from one necklace to another --> This is now complete as sentence.

Finally, just as you will see verbs ending in -ing does not mean that they will act as verbs per se. For instance, gerunds are also "verbs" ending in "ing" but will play the role of nouns.
eg. Eating too much is not good --> Here "eating" is a gerund, not a verb.
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2011, 04:12
(B)

(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one
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Re: SC Nobel prize [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2011, 04:12
(B)

(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one
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Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 05 Jul 2012, 08:16
if i am not mistaken ,genes can jump is a clause , how can like be used to compare clauses
Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel   [#permalink] 05 Jul 2012, 08:16
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