Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 27 Aug 2014, 09:03

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
2 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 27 May 2009
Posts: 282
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 59 [2] , given: 18

GMAT Tests User
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 23 Aug 2009, 10:35
2
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

57% (01:34) correct 43% (00:36) wrong based on 231 sessions
126. More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can
"jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one



[Reveal] Spoiler:
oa b: PLS EXPLAIN WHY D is not the answer... as in B it compares genes jump with pearls???? where i am wrong
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Zarrolou on 23 Jul 2013, 02:31, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question, added OA.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Sep 2009
Posts: 119
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 10

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2009, 01:50
Like ? In a clause with a verb ?

The OA should be A or E...
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Sep 2009
Posts: 119
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 14 [1] , given: 10

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2009, 02:26
1
This post received
KUDOS
Like is not supposed to carry a full sentence with a verb but only a noun "like you... like the bears... "
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 01 Apr 2008
Posts: 909
Schools: IIM Lucknow (IPMX) - Class of 2014
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 204 [0], given: 18

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2009, 06:16
I agree with B. Here, the phrase "moving mysteriously from..." describes pearls, so that phrase is a kind of 'adjective'.

Hence, comparison is rightly done using 'like' between 'jumping genes' and 'moving pearls'
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Sep 2009
Posts: 119
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 10

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2009, 09:01
Not so much, as the answer is B...

I'm currently googling... it seems that B is a noun phrase and thus can use like in order to introduce a big noun
4 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 28 Aug 2009
Posts: 196
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 45 [4] , given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2009, 09:05
4
This post received
KUDOS
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
AS PEARLS MOVE would have been a correct usage of AS
but here a noun PEARLS is being compared to GENES and hence LIKE is correct
MOVING MYSTERIOUSLY FROM .... participle phrase for an analogy of the way the genes move around
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
CORRECT
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
AS PEARLS DO is correct but THAT is incorrect because THAT cannot restrict
the action DO of pearls
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
LIKE PEARLS DO is incorrect since LIKE cannot modify a clause "pearls do"
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one

AS has to be followed by the noun/pronoun performing the clause
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2010
Posts: 48
WE 1: Business Development Manger
WE 2: Assistant Manager-Carbon Trading
WE 3: Manager-Carbon Trading
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 16

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2010, 02:46
OA is B ...we use Like because it can be used as a preposition followed by noun and pearl is a noun
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Sep 2010
Posts: 186
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 62 [0], given: 18

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 18 Dec 2010, 01:15
A great question to dispel so many doubts . Kudos to the one who posted it and Kudos to many other who explained it so beautifully.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2010
Posts: 184
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 4

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2011, 04:11
(B)

(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one
_________________

Raptor

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2010
Posts: 172
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 10

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2011, 17:31
B we are comparing necklace moving to pearls
use like in similar in behavior or comparing nouns
clearly like win
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Single
Joined: 05 Jun 2011
Posts: 133
Location: Shanghai China
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2011, 16:43
I still do not understand when use like and when use as. Can someone explain to me.

Posted from my mobile device Image
1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 Mar 2011
Posts: 469
Location: Texas
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 54 [1] , given: 20

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2011, 21:25
1
This post received
KUDOS
Any one of the reason can be used to pick the correct choice B.

1) the sentence does not express a reality
2) word following as/like is 'pearls' - noun
3) there is no clause immediately following as/like.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2009
Posts: 120
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 4
WE: General Management (Insurance)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 9 [0], given: 16

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2011, 21:50
B.+1. Like is used when you have to explain a similar manner and As is used to introduce examples.Here you need to explain that genes jump in a similar manner like pearls jump-in literal sense. Hence Like is appropriate. Between B & D, in D from one necklace to others is awkward. Hence B.

Last edited by chandu4gmat on 13 Jul 2011, 00:08, edited 2 times in total.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 29 Jun 2010
Posts: 251
Schools: LBS, Oxford
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 12

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2011, 22:29
sasen wrote:
LIKE PEARLS DO is incorrect since LIKE cannot modify a clause "pearls do"


Can some1 explain it a bit more

many thanks
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 19 Jun 2011
Posts: 26
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2011, 09:46
Thought it was D but now agree that it should be B.
1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Status: GMAT Learner
Joined: 14 Jul 2010
Posts: 652
Followers: 34

Kudos [?]: 217 [1] , given: 32

GMAT Tests User
Re: Dr. Barbara McClintock [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2011, 13:16
1
This post received
KUDOS
Like - used to compare two nouns. As - used to compare two clauses.
In D do incorrectly used here. Correct ans. B
_________________

I am student of everyone-baten
Collections:-
PSof OG solved by GC members: http://gmatclub.com/forum/collection-ps-with-solution-from-gmatclub-110005.html
DS of OG solved by GC members: http://gmatclub.com/forum/collection-ds-with-solution-from-gmatclub-110004.html
100 GMAT PREP Quantitative collection http://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-prep-problem-collections-114358.html
Collections of work/rate problems with solutions http://gmatclub.com/forum/collections-of-work-rate-problem-with-solutions-118919.html
Mixture problems in a file with best solutions: http://gmatclub.com/forum/mixture-problems-with-best-and-easy-solutions-all-together-124644.html

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2009
Posts: 141
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 26 [0], given: 97

GMAT Tests User
Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2012, 19:34
The correct ansvver to this one is C not B
Expert Post
3 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 2038
Followers: 491

Kudos [?]: 2016 [3] , given: 30

Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2012, 22:19
3
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
rohansherry wrote:
126. More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Prize winner, reported that genes can
"jump," as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another.
(A) as pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(B) like pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another
(C) as pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(D) like pearls do that move mysteriously from one necklace to others
(E) as do pearls that move mysteriously from one necklace to some other one


I am responding to a p.m. from venmic, vvho vvrote: "The correct ansvver to this one is C not B." I am sorry to differ, but the correct ansvver is B

Idea #1
"like" is used for nouns only, to compare a noun to a noun
"as" introduces a full clause, that must have a full noun + verb structure
See these blog post:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... ike-vs-as/
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sente ... omparison/

Idea #2
DO NOT confuse a [noun + participle] structure for a full [noun + verb] structure. This is a very common mistake, the GMAT loves to catch folks in it.
A participle is a verb form, but it's not acting as a verb in the sentence --- rather, it's acting as a noun modifier.
See this blog:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/participle ... -the-gmat/

The phrase "pearls moving mysteriously from one necklace to another" is not a full [noun + verb] clause --- it would not stand on it's own as a sentence. Rather, it's simply a noun plus a long noun modifier. All we have is the noun and stuff decorating the noun, so "as" is incorrect, and "like" is correct. That's why (A) is wrong and (B) is right.

Once we have the words "pearls do", that's a noun + verb, a clause all on its own --- then "like" is wrong: this is why (D) is wrong. Choices (C) & (E) have the correct word "as" followed by a full clause --- they avoid the "as"/"like" mistake. BUT, (C) & (E) are wordier, less polished, less elegant, more awkward. (B) is much more sleek and efficient, which makes (B) the correct answer.

Does all that make sense?

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

2 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2011
Posts: 185
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 58 [2] , given: 103

Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2012, 05:34
2
This post received
KUDOS
I do have a question whether we are comparing genes with pearls or we are comparing the action of jumping
of genes with action of pearls movement.
_________________

If u can't jump the 700 wall , drill a big hole and cross it .. I can and I WILL DO IT ...need some encouragement and inspirations from U ALL

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 2038
Followers: 491

Kudos [?]: 2016 [1] , given: 30

Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2012, 09:43
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
sujit2k7 wrote:
I do have a question whether we are comparing genes with pearls or we are comparing the action of jumping
of genes with action of pearls movement.


It's funny --- that question doesn't have a clear precise mathematical answer. In the big picture, in the overall logic of the sentence and of the larger argument, we are drawing an analogy between genes jumping and pearls moving, between the two actions, but when we use the construction "...like pearls ...", as in the correct answer (B), then the literal grammatical comparison is between genes and pearls, the two nouns.

Does that make sense?

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

Re: More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel   [#permalink] 27 Sep 2012, 09:43
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel sreekanthssn 0 23 Jul 2013, 02:24
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel jitendra 6 19 Jan 2010, 06:38
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel x2suresh 4 11 Feb 2009, 14:12
More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel jimmyjamesdonkey 4 30 Jun 2007, 14:00
10 More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel Paul 20 11 Oct 2004, 07:59
Display posts from previous: Sort by

More than thirty years ago Dr. Barbara McClintock, the Nobel

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 23 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.