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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from

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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from [#permalink] New post 24 Nov 2010, 21:52
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Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

A. comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that
B. comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they
C. come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and
D. come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and that
E. come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by mau5 on 16 Sep 2013, 05:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 06:52
raghavs wrote:
Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from antioxidants—compounds also
found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C that inhibit the formation of plaque
along the body’s blood vessels.
A. comes from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and
vitamin C that
B. comes from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene,
vitamin E, and vitamin C, and they
C. come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and
vitamin C, and
D. come from antioxidants—compounds that are also found in beta carotene, vitamin
E, and vitamin C and that
E. come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and
vitamin C, and they


I would pick D for parallelism here. "...that are ..found..and that inhibit.
In C ..."compounds also found ...and inhibit' I think it would be correct to say : "compounds also found, inhibit" without "and".
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 08:14
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+1 D

"compounds also found..." is a phrase. I think that you cannot mix it with a clause when you introduce the verb "inhibit". You need something to do it; in this case a relative clause (THAT) is used to introduce the verb "inhibit".
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 08:57
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What is wrong with C?

When fully expanded C will read:

Most of the purported health benefits of tea come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

The subject of the first part is - most (of the health benefits)- and the verb is – come -. By default, the subject of the second part is -( most ) of the health benefits -and its verb – Inhibit.

You can see the distortion of the meaning that it is the purported health benefits that inhibit plaque rather then the anti-oxidants. This is why C is not the right choice.

In E, the pronoun they may refer to the health benefits since subject rightly takes priority over any other noun that is placed nearer than the subject, per se.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 09:10
I chose D...for parallelism but what about the 3/2 split "come vs comes".....recognizing this will probably help us solve this question faster.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 09:15
daagh wrote:
What is wrong with C?

When fully expanded C will read:

Most of the purported health benefits of tea come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

The subject of the first part is - most (of the health benefits)- and the verb is – come -. By default, the subject of the second part is -( most ) of the health benefits -and its verb – Inhibit.

You can see the distortion of the meaning that it is the purported health benefits that inhibit plaque rather then the anti-oxidants. This is why C is not the right choice.

In E, the pronoun they may refer to the health benefits since subject rightly takes priority over any other noun that is placed nearer than the subject, per se.


Are you sure? I think that the dash ( - ) separates the main clause from the phrase "compounds also found...". I think that the problem is not subject-verb agreement.
Your thoughts please.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 09:38
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The dash (-) is a parenthetical sign (akin to a colon ) that describes the antioxidants, .
- compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C,. This is an essential feature of the sentence and the text will maintain the original meaning , even if the parenthetical contents removed. All the same, the subject remains - most. -

My intent is to point out the distortion of the meaning that it is the purported health benefits that inhibit plaque rather then the anti-oxidants.

This is why C is not the right choice.

But I never said anything about S-V agreement. Have I been misunderstood?
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 10:47
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daagh wrote:
What is wrong with C?

When fully expanded C will read:

Most of the purported health benefits of tea come from antioxidants—compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels.

The subject of the first part is - most (of the health benefits)- and the verb is – come -. By default, the subject of the second part is -( most ) of the health benefits -and its verb – Inhibit.

You can see the distortion of the meaning that it is the purported health benefits that inhibit plaque rather then the anti-oxidants. This is why C is not the right choice.

In E, the pronoun they may refer to the health benefits since subject rightly takes priority over any other noun that is placed nearer than the subject, per se.


Hmm…as per your suggestion, substituting "-" for a ":" in C would read:

Most of the purported health benefits of tea come from antioxidants: compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit the formation of plaque along the bodys blood vessels.

Are you saying that compounds modifies antioxidants, while inhibit modifies Most of the purported health benefits?

I would strongly agree with metallicafan that phrases and clauses cannot be parallel and hence, C is not correct.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 11:32
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@EducationAisle: I never said C is the correct answer. I am also saying C is not the correct answer.
Secondly, inhibit is the verb of the second part of the compound clause and not a modifier.

In addition, IMO. metallicafan discussed only S-V agreement and not modification or parallelism. I also never said clauses and phrases have to be parallel.

Incidentally, what will be the subject of the second clause? Unless the subject of the first clause can also act a the subject of the second clause, we can not afford to drop it. If you mean to say that the subject in the second place is antioxidants or compounds, then it has to be mentioned per se verbatim. Otherwise it is a grammatical error IMO .

Still I want to know, whether I have been misunderstood.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 11:52
daagh wrote:
@EducationAisle: I never said C is the correct answer. I am also saying C is not the correct answer.
Secondly, inhibit is the verb of the second part of the compound clause and not a modifier.

In addition, IMO. metallicafan discussed only S-V agreement and not modification or parallelism. I also never said clauses and phrases have to be parallel.

Incidentally, what will be the subject of the second clause? Unless the subject of the first clause can also act a the subject of the second clause, we can not afford to drop it. If you mean to say that the subject in the second place is antioxidants or compounds, then it has to be mentioned per se verbatim. Otherwise it is a grammatical error IMO .

Still I want to know, whether I have been misunderstood.



daagh, i understood you, plus i liked your explanation :wink:

I believe people misunderstood you because you didnt quote "whats wrong with c?" they assumed its your statement
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2010, 22:03
daagh wrote:
@EducationAisle: I never said C is the correct answer. I am also saying C is not the correct answer.
Secondly, inhibit is the verb of the second part of the compound clause and not a modifier.

In addition, IMO. metallicafan discussed only S-V agreement and not modification or parallelism. I also never said clauses and phrases have to be parallel.

Incidentally, what will be the subject of the second clause? Unless the subject of the first clause can also act a the subject of the second clause, we can not afford to drop it. If you mean to say that the subject in the second place is antioxidants or compounds, then it has to be mentioned per se verbatim. Otherwise it is a grammatical error IMO .

Still I want to know, whether I have been misunderstood.


Hi!! The endeavor here is to figure out ‘why’ C is wrong. C would read:

Most of the purported health benefits of tea come from antioxidants- compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels

If instead of ‘-‘, we had a comma, then the sentence would read:

Most of the purported health benefits of tea come from antioxidants, compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C, and inhibit the formation of plaque along the body’s blood vessels

In this case, 'compounds….vitamin C' would be a non-essential modifier and so, 'inhibit the formation…' would describe Most of the purported health benefits (and is hence, logically incorrect).

However, since in the actual sentence, we have ‘-‘ and not comma, we are wondering if 'inhibit the formation…' still describes Most of the purported health benefits.

p.s. Modifiers are not a ‘part of speech’ but an ‘umbrella category’, if you will. Perhaps you would be aware that adjectives, adverbs and all adjective and adverb phrases fall into this ‘category’ of modifiers.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2010, 09:18
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@EducationAisleh: 1.I am saying that C is wrong. Are you saying that C is right?
2. According to your averment, because a comma is absent and only a hyphen is there, the word “inhibit” will be verbing the antioxidants.
3. In other words, IYO, the use of comma would turn the sentence illogical while the use of a hyphen renders it logical. Is my understanding right? Then, if the verb “inhibit” is referring to the antioxidants- compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C ( here found is a participle ) and inhibit ( inhibit is a verb), the paramount question is whether we can we have a participle on one side of the coordinating conjunction and a present tense verb on the other side. This is a grammatical blunder, because a coordinating conjunction such as “and” will conjunct only equal things. If indeed the antioxidants are acting as the subject of inhibit, then the right structure should be: the antioxidants- compounds also found in beta carotene, vitamin E, and vitamin C and inhibiting the formation (here both found and inhibiting are participles)

IMO, the plural verb “inhibit” is parallel to the verb “come” in the earlier portion of the sentence and thus renders the whole logic a fallacy.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2010, 09:47
Not really sure what 'bluder' you are referring to. For example, following is a perfectly valid sentence:

US always participates in Olympics and has often emerged at the top in Olympics.

First clause is Present tense, the second (after 'and') uses Past Participle 'emerged'.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2010, 10:36
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Has often emerged is the present perfect tense using the past participle form of the verb emerge. (How else can one create a perfect tense)?

But please look at the problem in your example. On the one hand, the first part says that the US always participates in the Olympics( meaning that it participated in the past , participates in the present and will also participate in the future- a routine phenomenon) while the second part says that (the US) has often emerged at the top in Olympics. This means that it emerged at the top in Olympics in the past, and has emerged in the present. By using the present perfect, it is not clear whether the US will continue to do so in the future. If you have to include the future into the scheme, then you have to say: The US always participates in Olympics and emerges often at the top in Olympics. If you still think that your example is a perfectly valid one, in spite of using the perfect tense, I am none to stop you.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2010, 18:27
daagh wrote:
If you have to include the future into the scheme, then you have to say:

The US always participates in Olympics and emerges often at the top in Olympics.



While we have definitely digressed from the original topic, this example definitely does not mean that US will 'continue to win' in future as well.
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Re: whats wrong in C [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2010, 19:32
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EducationAisle: IMO, the use of the present tense emerges does indicate that it will continue to do so in the future. When we say, "The Sun rises in the east", we do not just mean that it rises only as of now but also in the future. When we say Tom goes for jogging every morning, it means that he went in the past, he goes at present and will continue to go in the future.

If you think otherwise, you are welcome. But before that, pl. have a look at the link below

http://www.learnenglish.de/grammar/tensesimpresfut.htm
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Re: Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from [#permalink] New post 17 Sep 2013, 10:43
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Bumping for review and further discussion*.

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Re: Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2013, 08:07
My two cents. For someone who wishes to find the issue in these options.

Rule 1 :
And is used as a co-ordinating conjunction to join two independent clauses (may be related in ideas)
Construction 1: clause 1 + comma + and + clause 2

Rule 2 :
And is used for connecting two or more items in a series. While connecting two items, we need not use a comma, but while connecting more than two items, we need to use the comma separator.

Construction 2: entity 1 + and + entity 2
Ex: My puppy has too much hair and too many fleas.

Construction 3: entity 1, entity 2, and entity 3
Ex: I love orange, mangoes, and pineapples.
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Re: Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from [#permalink] New post 26 Sep 2014, 11:39
The 2/3 split here is right at the start of the underlined portion: do we need "comes" or "come"? The subject is "most of the purported health benefits," so we need the plural form "come".

We can eliminate E for using the pronoun "they," which could refer to antioxidants, compounds, or health benefits.

D uses parallel construction correctly:

"compounds that (are also found...) and that (inhibit the formation...)"

C does not use parallel form.
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Re: Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2014, 07:32
First look tell us that A and B are out. From C, D and E, D seems the best because of the 'That....and that' parallelism.
The meaning in C and E is distorted so D is the winner here !! took less than a minute !! :lol:
Re: Most of the purported health benefits of tea comes from   [#permalink] 01 Oct 2014, 07:32
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