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Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from

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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2012, 20:23
vksunder wrote:
Guys, I havent really started studying CR and this is the first time I've come across a question stem like the one mentioned here.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument? -- Does this mean weaken/undermine the argument in this question??


Start with the videos at the website

www.gmatprepnow.com

They have all the lesson modules of CR, RC and SC are free. Atleast you ll get an idea what you are heading into in Verbal Section.
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2012, 20:33
debaranjansahoo wrote:



They have all the lesson modules of CR, RC and SC are free. Atleast you ll get an idea what you are heading into in Verbal Section.


Thanks man for sharing the link. But when I clicked on a module, no video is coming up. Need to verify on a different computer.
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2013, 01:24
i can't understand why A is the answer.. i would choose this option only in a "weaken question", but this is an "evaluation question"; my kaplan book says: "The correct answer won't strengthen or weaken the author's reasoning or supply a missing assumption. Instead, the right answer will specify the kind of evidence that you would help you to judge the validity of the author's argument"
this is the reason why i'd chose C
can someone helps me?
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2013, 01:54
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lucasITA wrote:
i can't understand why A is the answer.. i would choose this option only in a "weaken question", but this is an "evaluation question"; my kaplan book says: "The correct answer won't strengthen or weaken the author's reasoning or supply a missing assumption. Instead, the right answer will specify the kind of evidence that you would help you to judge the validity of the author's argument"
this is the reason why i'd chose C
can someone helps me?


We want to evaluate this:

Therefore, until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced, this method of obtaining uranium is unlikely to be commercially viable.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument?

a. Whether the uranium in deposits on land is rapidly being depleted
This is the correct answer. If the deposits on land are rapidly being depleted, the uranium's price is going to be higher so despite the high costs, the method of obtaining uranium will be commercially viable.

c. Whether there are any technological advances that show promise of reducing the costs of extracting uranium from seawater
I) show promise of reduce != will reduce
II) determining the possible existence of such technologies does not help us in evaluating the argument
(...) until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced (...) <== it has no effect on this
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2013, 05:55
icandy wrote:
Seems to be A for the reasons mentioned above.

rapid depletion on land will make the extraction from seawater a necessity and hence commercially viable.



I agree that rapid depletion on land will make the extraction from seawater a necessity, but how it makes it commercially viable then ?

Could anyone answer?

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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2013, 23:24
gmat blows wrote:
Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from the mines. It is possible to extract uranium from seawater, but the cost of doing so is greater than the price that Uranium fetches on the world market. Therefore, until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced, this method of obtaining uranium is unlikely to be commercially viable.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument?

a. Whether the uranium in deposits on land is rapidly being depleted
b. Whether most uranium is used near where it is mined
c. Whether there are any technological advances that show promise of reducing the costs of extracting uranium from seawater
d. Whether the total amount of Uranium in seawater is significantly greater than the total amount of uranium on land
e. Whether uranium can be extracted from freshwater at a cost similar to the cost of extracting it from seawater.


From the list of options, I left myself with A and C. What made (A) not an answer for me was the face that the question asked about commercial viability. If uranium deposits on land deplete themselves, we will have to start extracting from seawater. This doesn't address costs at all, so I chose (C).
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2014, 09:48
A nice question and good explanation by Zarrolou (3 posts above).
Bumping it up.
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 24 Sep 2014, 00:39
D would have been right if it was mentioned that amount of uranium per unit of seawater is higher that amount of uranium per unit of land
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2015, 04:53
Before everything, let's break down the prompt into pieces
• Uranium mostly come from mines. An alternative source would be from seawater, but it is too costly.
• Argument: Cost of extracting uranium from seawater should decrease to consider this option.

(A) Whether the uranium in deposits on land is rapidly being depleted
- Correct answer. It is important to know whether mining uranium will still be a viable option or not. If it is rapidly depleting, obtaining uranium from seawater will be the ONLY viable option. If it is not rapidly depleting, then it is not a viable option.
(B) Whether most uranium is used near where it is mined
- This is irrelevant to the argument, as this does not address whether extracting uranium in seawater could be an option
(C) Whether there are any technological advances that show promise of reducing the costs of extracting uranium from seawater
- This is future-driven. If there are technological advances that show promise of reducing the cost, it still does not make uranium extraction from seawater a viable option for now.
(D) Whether the total amount of Uranium in seawater is significantly greater than the total amount of uranium on land
- Irrelevant. What is important is the costly process of extraction, and not necessarily the total amount of uranium that can be extracted
(E) Whether uranium can be extracted from freshwater at a cost similar to the cost of extracting it from seawater.
- The question is whether it will be better to extract uranium in the mines or from seawater. And if it is too costly to extract from seawater, it would be efficient to extract from mines. This does not make extracting from seawater a viable option for now.
Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from   [#permalink] 05 Mar 2015, 04:53

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