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Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from

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Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 10:38
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Question Stats:

47% (02:17) correct 53% (00:57) wrong based on 112 sessions
Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from the mines. It is possible to extract uranium from seawater, but the cost of doing so is greater than the price that Uranium fetches on the world market. Therefore, until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced, this method of obtaining uranium is unlikely to be commercially viable.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument?

a. Whether the uranium in deposits on land is rapidly being depleted
b. Whether most uranium is used near where it is mined
c. Whether there are any technological advances that show promise of reducing the costs of extracting uranium from seawater
d. Whether the total amount of Uranium in seawater is significantly greater than the total amount of uranium on land
e. Whether uranium can be extracted from freshwater at a cost similar to the cost of extracting it from seawater.


-----
I was able to narrow down to A, C, and D
Ive convinced myself that 'technological advaces' to reduce cost was slighltly a shift of scope.
now, between A and D. I feel that they are almost synonymous in meaning. It would be important to know whether the uranium is being depleted (if not, then extracting from seawater is not needed). However, doesnt D) somewhat imply the same thing? If there isnt alot of uranium in the seawater to begin with, then the even the reduction in cost would not be worth it?

Am i thinking too much about this?
thanks.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by ankurgupta03 on 04 Jun 2014, 09:34, edited 1 time in total.
added the OA
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:00
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gmat blows wrote:
Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from the mines. It is possible to extract uranium from seawater, but the cost of doing so is greater than the price that Uranium fetches on the world market. Therefore, until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced, this method of obtaining uranium is unlikely to be commercially viable.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument?

a. Whether the uranium in deposits on land is rapidly being depleted
b. Whether most uranium is used near where it is mined
c. Whether there are any technological advances that show promise of reducing the costs of extracting uranium from seawater
d. Whether the total amount of Uranium in seawater is significantly greater than the total amount of uranium on land
e. Whether uranium can be extracted from freshwater at a cost similar to the cost of extracting it from seawater.


-----
I was able to narrow down to A, C, and D
Ive convinced myself that 'technological advaces' to reduce cost was slighltly a shift of scope.
now, between A and D. I feel that they are almost synonymous in meaning. It would be important to know whether the uranium is being depleted (if not, then extracting from seawater is not needed). However, doesnt D) somewhat imply the same thing? If there isnt alot of uranium in the seawater to begin with, then the even the reduction in cost would not be worth it?

Am i thinking too much about this?
thanks.


Lets just compare A and D.

First D. it compares the total amount of Uranium in seawater and Land. lets just say amount of U in seawater is 1000 and on land its 100. But it doesnt talk about the usage. May its possible that whatever amount is available on land, it'll last forever and we may never need to take it out from seawater

Lets see A. As the U deposit on land is depleting fast, we may landup in a situation where we have to extract U from seawater, even if it costs more than mining on land.

Clearly A wins
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:09
I'd slide towards C.

I belive we need to evaluate this argument (until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced...) by actually verifying the progress that has been made or by evaulating the efforts underway to reduce the cost. Hope it makes sense.

What is the OA. Is this from GMAT prep?
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:16
C
(reasoning same as above)
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:17
i will go with A . A is the winner between A & D for the reasons mentioned above .
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:20
C doesn't looks right to me since , we know that if the cost can be reduced than the seawater uranium could be of some help . So by c you will come to know that the technological advanced have been made or not...but how will you evaluate the argument on the basis of that...the argument already states that if somehow the cost can be reduced..which will be thru soe technological advances only.....

i don't get..why C?
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:24
Guys, I havent really started studying CR and this is the first time I've come across a question stem like the one mentioned here.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument? -- Does this mean weaken/undermine the argument in this question??
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 11:25
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Tricky one, but I would pick A.

Quote:
Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from the mines. It is possible to extract uranium from seawater, but the cost of doing so is greater than the price that Uranium fetches on the world market. Therefore, until the cost of extracting uranium from seawater can somehow be reduced, this method of obtaining uranium is unlikely to be commercially viable.

Which of the following would it be most useful to determine in evaluating the argument?

a. Whether the uranium in deposits on land is rapidly being depleted (could be. Reasoning here: deposits on land depleted -> price of Uranium on the world market goes up -> obtaining uranium from seawater becomes viable even if the cost of extracting remains the same -> the conclusion is not true. Other option: deposits on land are not depleted -> price of Uranium stands still -> extracting uranium from seawater at current price is not viable -> the conclusion is true.)

b. Whether most uranium is used near where it is mined (not relevant)

c. Whether there are any technological advances that show promise of reducing the costs of extracting uranium from seawater (This might seem as the answer, but I think it is not. Notice that we needn’t to know whether the cost of extracting of uranium from the seawater will go down. We have to verify the claim ‘Unless the cost goes down, this method won’t be viable’ – which is not the same. And the information about the promise of reducing cost doesn’t help us to verify the claim. Here we have only costs go down - > extracting from seawater may be viable. But we in fact need some info about the situation when the costs of extracting will NOT go down, BUT the obtaining uranium from seawater becomes profitable)

d. Whether the total amount of Uranium in seawater is significantly greater than the total amount of uranium on land (doesn’t help us either. Perhaps the amount of uranium on land, while less than in seawater, is still sufficient to satisfy the market demand)

e. Whether uranium can be extracted from freshwater at a cost similar to the cost of extracting it from seawater. (doesn’t help us since the argument considers only the issue of sea-water-extracted uranium)
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 12:29
definitely A. It would be economical to use seawater uranium extraction if either cost is reduced or price goes up. The argument states that the cost has to be reduced which is true only is price doesn't go up. Depletion of supply will definitely cause price to go up.
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2009, 15:45
Does anyone know the OA?
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2009, 18:42
Seems to be A for the reasons mentioned above.

rapid depletion on land will make the extraction from seawater a necessity and hence commercially viable.
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 04 Jan 2009, 15:32
Precisely the option (A)
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 04 Jan 2009, 17:33
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vscid wrote:
Does anyone know the OA?


OA is A :-D
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 04 Jan 2009, 20:06
sondenso wrote:
vscid wrote:
Does anyone know the OA?


OA is A :-D


long time sondenso. :-D
did you write your GMAT?
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 05 Jan 2009, 15:49
C is pretty darn convincing. Any other reasons why it's not C?
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Re: CR - Supply of Uranium [#permalink] New post 05 Jan 2009, 21:31
I would go for A over D because D is an order of magnitude that is not clear.
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2012, 22:35
My answer is also A.

If I were a VC and need to start doing the business of extracting uranium from sea water, I will go with A because that is the shortest way to determine the success of my venture. Sure, C also helps, but it takes time. And the question is about 'most useful', hence A wins over C.
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2012, 01:29
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i"ll go with A...
This Q is about evaluating the argument, If uranium in deposits on land is not rapidly being depleted, then y we should be bothered about technology advances and extracting uranium from seawater
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2012, 02:21
riteshv wrote:
i"ll go with A...
This Q is about evaluating the argument, If uranium in deposits on land is not rapidly being depleted, then y we should be bothered about technology advances and extracting uranium from seawater


I disagree with your reasoning...

the question is all about - should we need to extract uranium from seawater, what do we need to know. But your reasoning is like- should we need to extract uranium from seawater. There is a big difference.
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Re: Most of the world's supply of uranium currently comes from [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2012, 02:58
ok tricky one...I chose C, but now i get why A is correct. thanks everyone
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