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Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate

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Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2003, 15:35
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

66% (02:49) correct 33% (01:49) wrong based on 15 sessions
Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?

A. 10%
B. 12%
C. 15%
D. 17%
E. 20%
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Re: PS: What's a Quick Way to Get This? [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2003, 17:16
Curly05 wrote:
14. Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all the votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?


Divide the vote into 10 parts. He got 4 parts, he needs 5 parts. So he need 1 part out of the remaining 6 parts or .166666666...% -- plus one vote.
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AkamaiBrah
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Vice President, Midtown NYC Investment Bank, Structured Finance IT
MFE, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley, Class of 2005
MBA, Anderson School of Management, UCLA, Class of 1993

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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2003, 17:25
But how did you get six remaining parts, partner?
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Answer [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2003, 18:21
The other candidate received the six remaining "parts" (or six-tenths of the vote).

For the vote to have been 50/50, one of the other candidates "tenths" would have to convert to Mr. Kramer. So one tenth out of six tenths is 1/6 = .1666667. That is the fraction of the TOTAL vote that would have to be shifted in order for Mr. Kramer to have tied the vote 50/50.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2003, 18:23
****, another thing, we tend to overlook as testakers, that's all ETS is good for!
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2003, 21:40
1/6 = .1666667 is a half of your success.

but the stem asks about approximate percentage!
The correct answer is 17%
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Good Point [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2003, 09:55
Great point Stolyar!! Hopefully we would recognize this in the choices (and also remember to round up rather than down), but in other questions such as CR, if we omit something small like "EXCEPT", we will be cooked!

AkamaiBrah, reading what you wrote two posts above made me laugh out loud at work!!! Curly, can you repeat that question/statement please?
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2003, 11:10
stolyar wrote:
1/6 = .1666667 is a half of your success.

but the stem asks about approximate percentage!
The correct answer is 17%


Strictily speaking, since 1/6 has infinitely repeating decimals, an approximate could be:

17%
16.7%
16.67%
etc.

Just have to look at the answers and pick appropriate choice.
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PS percentage problem [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 17:39
Please time yourself and show the time also.

14. Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all the votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?
(A) 10%
(B) 12%
(C) 15%
(D) 17%
(E) 20%
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Re: PS percentage problem [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 19:40
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1 min
Assume there are 100 votes
Kramer has 40 and the winner has 60
Kramer needs atleast 50 which means atleast 10 out of 60 which is 16.67%
Hence I'll go with D
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2004, 06:28
1:10

Method same as Srijay.

Picking number is best technique for % problems.
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Re: PS percentage problem [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2004, 10:10
srijay007 wrote:
1 min
Assume there are 100 votes
Kramer has 40 and the winner has 60
Kramer needs atleast 50 which means atleast 10 out of 60 which is 16.67%
Hence I'll go with D


Great I like this one. Thanks srijay007.

--Bhai
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Ans [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2004, 05:55
Answer A
Time 1:43

need to approximate to do this fast
i.e. 942568 = 940000

is this the right answer?
ahh yes i see it now.. as usuall jumped to an aswer without reading careful

D is indeed the right answer
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Re: PS percentage problem [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2004, 06:42
Bhai wrote:
Please time yourself and show the time also.

14. Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all the votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?
(A) 10%
(B) 12%
(C) 15%
(D) 17%
(E) 20%



D, of course. :)

10%/60% = 16.66% ~~ 17%.
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PS 1 [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2005, 09:05
Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all the votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?
(A) 10%
(B) 12%
(C) 15%
(D) 17%
(E) 20%


What is a simple and fast approach to do this?
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2005, 09:21
Is it D 17%

Assume the total votes cast 100- votes recd 40, remaining votes 60. K needs 10 more votes to get 50% . hence percent out of remaining = 100*10/60 = 17%
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2005, 09:24
Votes he has is 942568 = 0.4 S where S is total of all votes

He need 0.5 S votes.

So % of Votes Required = 0.5S - 0.4 S
------------------ --------------- = 0.1 S/ 0.6 S = 17%.
Votes Remaining S - 0.4S
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2005, 15:13
Note to self. Big numbers mean its universally applicable. so pick easy numbers like 100 and go ahead with the problem and would end up with the same result.
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ETS Paper Test Q5 [#permalink] New post 14 Oct 2005, 11:40
Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all the votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?

A. 10%
B. 12%
C. 15%
D. 17%
E. 20%
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Oct 2005, 12:14
I will aproximate to
D. 15%

let total vote cast is x
0.4 x = 942,568
or
x = 23564200
if he had to get 50% he need another 10%
0.1 x = 2356420
remaining votes:
0.6 x = 14138520

2356420 / 14138520
  [#permalink] 14 Oct 2005, 12:14
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