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Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate

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Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2006, 07:22
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D
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Mr. Kramer, the losing candidate in a two-candidate election, received 942,568 votes, which was exactly 40 percent of all the votes cast. Approximately what percent of the remaining votes would he need to have received in order to have won at least 50 percent of all the votes cast?

a. 10%
b. 12%
c. 15%
d. 17%
e. 20%
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Answer D 17% [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2006, 08:13
The number of votes recived is irrelevent in this questions

Question says Mr Kramer recived 40% of votes

100 votes Kramer gor 40 so other candidate got 60

To get 50% of votes Kramer needs 10 more votes

that would be 10/60= 1000/60= 16.66%
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2006, 08:19
I'd say (A) ~10%. it's actually just slightly more.
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Re: Answer D 17% [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2006, 09:48
Damager wrote:
The number of votes recived is irrelevent in this questions

Question says Mr Kramer recived 40% of votes

100 votes Kramer gor 40 so other candidate got 60

To get 50% of votes Kramer needs 10 more votes

that would be 10/60= 1000/60= 16.66%


Very good to know. I worked out the entire problem and got 16.66% as well. This problem is not so much hard as it is time consuming as we are dealing with very large numbers.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2006, 10:15
My answer is also 16.66%.. Good to know the technique described above!!
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2006, 04:21
Damager, great thinking. I got so caught up working with the big figure that was given when in fact, you're right! I didn't even need to use it!

Thanks everyone. :)
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2006, 04:34
D

Was breaking my head for a minute or more before I realized that we don't need the actual votes.

10*100/60 is all we need.
Duh! :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2006, 04:39
I know! It's so frustrating. If it were the real GMAT i would've wasted so much time on this question. Thought of that happening scares me... :(
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2006, 15:16
lol I lost 1 minute too thinking what the 10% of 9... is, until I realized that all we need to do is focus on %'s. That's why I love #100 so much.
Good stuff!
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2006, 15:32
Damager ... That was a cool way of solving this problem...
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2006, 12:08
Slick solution!
One question, how did you make the transition from 10/60 to 1000/60?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2006, 13:10
agree with the above, needs extra 10% i.e. 1/6 of the remaining 60% = 16.666
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 [#permalink] New post 27 May 2007, 16:44
Damager wrote:
10/60 reprenesnted as % = 10*100/60 %


Damager wrote:
The number of votes recived is irrelevent in this questions

Question says Mr Kramer recived 40% of votes

100 votes Kramer gor 40 so other candidate got 60

To get 50% of votes Kramer needs 10 more votes

that would be 10/60= 1000/60= 16.66%


:lol:
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Re: Answer D 17% [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2007, 16:00
Damager wrote:
The number of votes recived is irrelevent in this questions

Question says Mr Kramer recived 40% of votes

100 votes Kramer gor 40 so other candidate got 60

To get 50% of votes Kramer needs 10 more votes

that would be 10/60= 1000/60= 16.66%


good to know. I spent about 6 minutes doing the long division on this to get the same answer.
Re: Answer D 17%   [#permalink] 01 Sep 2007, 16:00
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