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MSc Finance and MBA

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MSc Finance and MBA [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2013, 00:17
I have seen a lot of people on web discussing the pros and cons of MSc Finance and MBA. However, I haven't seen anyone discussing about having both the degrees. Its something not common for sure. I'd like to get people's opinion on why don't they see acquiring both the degrees as an option? MSc Finance courses in europe are usually 1 year courses which deal primarily with maths and finance in depth. Whereas, MBA is more of a generalist degree focusing much more on administration or let's say less on "in depth" finance. Does anyone think that having both the degrees makes you strong on both the fronts? Or, is it true that
2 years of MBA> 1 year MSc Finance
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Re: MSc Finance and MBA [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2013, 16:11
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An MBA, as you've said, is a "general" degree -- you can use an MBA to take your career in pretty much any direction you want to go in. Most people going into an MBA at least have a few years of work experience under their belt. The advantage there is that everyone brings their experiences to the classroom experience, and you learn as much (if not more) from your peers as you do from your professors.

A Masters in Finance is a much more specific degree. With an MFin, you're basically saying your short term (and ideally long term) career goal is to be in finance. Most people in MFin programs -- especially top programs like MIT and Princeton -- are right out of college or maybe 1 or 2 years out. Most tend to be international (non-US) students as well. The curriculum teaches you everything you'd ever want to know about finance and the jobs you'll be recruited for will only be in those areas.

The only way I can think of where someone would get both degrees is if you got an MFin straight out of school, worked in finance for a few years, and realized you wanted a career change. Then an MBA would be a degree you could use to change careers to something else. I guess you could also use the MBA to gain managerial skills, since an MFin does not teach you much of that.

I wouldn't say that an 2-year MBA is "better" than an MFin degree. People looking at each program tend to have very different goals and potentially very different backgrounds, nevermind the typical age groups of applicants. If you're considering both options, take a focused look at where you see your career headed. Do you want to be in finance and ONLY in finance? Or is finance an option you want to consider, but could you also see yourself doing strategy consulting or marketing? Those answers will lead you to different degrees.
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Re: MSc Finance and MBA [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2013, 17:41
As said below, you are talking about a generalist degree for experienced people and a specialist degree, typically pursued by less experienced individuals.

Why would you have both? Well think about it. A top MBA depends on a variety of factors, work experience being one of them. If you graduate from a school that doesn't have strong recruiting, or you have a bad UG GPA, you can find you beginning career to be stunted or non-existent. Without strong work experience you will find it hard to get into a top MBA program. So many students will use the MSF as another year to network, as a brand improvement, a chance to redo your GPA, etc. If the MSF allows you to get a better job than you would have otherwise secured, then the MSF is a boost to your MBA chances.

Specialized masters are still new, but maybe one day people will use them as an MBA substitute. Right now they serve a great place as that junior graduate degree.
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Re: MSc Finance and MBA   [#permalink] 12 Feb 2013, 17:41
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