Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 20 Aug 2014, 08:50

Flash Sale:

The Economist GMAT Tutor - 15% Off All Courses


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

My collection of sc flashcards

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
3 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [3] , given: 5

My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 03:27
3
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Hi all,

I'll be posting a set of flash card i've prepared for myself.

Quantity words - Singular OR Plural?

1. For pronouns such as "All", "Some", "Any", "Most", "None" (SANAM), determine whether the pronoun referring to something is COUNTABLE or not.
If it is COUNTABLE, the sentence takes PLURAL verb. If it is NOT COUNTABLE, the sentence takes SINGULAR verb.

Examples:
Some of the students in the class have taken exam. -- Students are COUNTABLE. Hence, it takes plural verb "have"
Some of the grain was ruined in floods. -- Grain is NOT COUNTABLE. Hence, it takes singular verb "was".


2. With fractional expressions, determine verb by what is being measured: COUNTABLE or NOT.

Examples:
Three-fifths of the students in the class have taken their exams. -- Students are COUNTABLE. Hence, it takes plural verb "have"
Half of the grain was lost -- Grain is NOT COUNTABLE. Hence, it takes singular verb "was".
Kaplan Promo CodeKnewton GMAT Discount CodesGMAT Pill GMAT Discount Codes
2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [2] , given: 5

Re: My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 03:33
2
This post received
KUDOS
"Class Nouns" such as Clothing, Food, Furniture, Apparel, Hardware, Equipment, Software etc. are always SINGULAR and must therefore take a SINGULAR verb.
2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [2] , given: 5

Re: My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 03:50
2
This post received
KUDOS
"In contrast to":

If you say "in contrast to", then you don't HAVE to mention both statistics... Although you still can mention.


Examples:
"In contrast to the corresponding rate in Esteria, the unemployment rate in Burdistan fell last month." -- CORRECT! In this case, the "in contrast to" construction implies that the Esterian rate went up. We don't actually have to say this explicitly.

But, if you want, you can mention both statistics:
"In contrast to the corresponding rate in Esteria, which rose by 0.5%, the unemployment rate in Burdistan fell by 0.3% last month." -- ALSO CORRECT!



Courtesy: Ron Purewal, GMAT Expert.
2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [2] , given: 5

Re: My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 19 Jun 2012, 04:13
2
This post received
KUDOS
You CANNOT end a modifier with a preposition.

Examples:
"dioxins that north americans are exposed to" -- INCORRECT.
"dioxins to which north americans are exposed" -- CORRECT

Gmat sc 1000 example question

A report by the American Academy for the Advancement of Science has concluded that much of the currently uncontrolled dioxins to which North Americans are exposed comes from the incineration of wastes.
(A) much of the currently uncontrolled dioxins to which North Americans are exposed comes
(B) much of the currently uncontrolled dioxins that North Americans are exposed to come
(C) much of the dioxins that are currently uncontrolled and that North Americans are exposed to comes
(D) many of the dioxins that are currently uncontrolled and North Americans are exposed to come
(E) many of the currently uncontrolled dioxins to which North Americans are exposed come

The OA is E.

Two points:

first, dioxins are countable (the fact that it's pluralized means that it's a countable noun). The sentence is referring to different dioxins, not the overall level of dioxin (which would be uncountable).

Second, "to which North Americans are exposed" not only uses the right idiom, it also avoids the issue of dangling participles (although the GMAT doesn't usually test on that issue, it's technically incorrect to end a sentence or clause with a preposition).
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [1] , given: 5

Re: My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2012, 03:52
1
This post received
KUDOS
Phrase/Clause as SUBJECT:

The subject of a sentence is sometimes an entire phrase/clause. However, they are ALWAYS SINGULAR and require only SINGULAR VERBS.

Examples:
Having good experience in a field does bring in great opportunities.
Whatever they want to do is fine with me.
2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [2] , given: 5

Re: My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2012, 03:54
2
This post received
KUDOS
Split Infinitive Error:

Avoid sentences that insert word(s) between "to" and the verb.

Examples:
I need you to quickly run out of the house. -- WRONG!
I need you to run quickly out of the house. -- RIGHT!
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2012
Posts: 22
Location: United States
Concentration: Leadership, Finance
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.5
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 2 [1] , given: 5

Re: My collection of sc flashcards [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2012, 03:56
1
This post received
KUDOS
Possessive Pronouns:

Possessive Pronouns can refer back to ONLY Possessive nouns.

Subject and Object Pronouns can refer back to ONLY Subject and Objects nouns respectively. (NOT Possessive Nouns)


Example:
Jose's room is so messy that his mother calls him a pig -- WRONG! "Him" (Object Pronoun) refers to Jose's (Possessive Noun).

Jose's room is so messy that his mother calls Jose a pig -- RIGHT!
Re: My collection of sc flashcards   [#permalink] 21 Jun 2012, 03:56
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
macjas's GMAT SC flashcards! macjas 0 09 May 2012, 22:20
1 Flashcards raviram80 2 06 Mar 2012, 10:40
Flashcards raviram80 3 06 Mar 2012, 10:39
443 Experts publish their posts in the topic My comprehensive Quant Flashcards! miguelmick 102 22 Feb 2011, 08:46
119 THE ULTIMATE FLASHCARDS FOR SC dimitri92 16 06 Jun 2010, 12:51
Display posts from previous: Sort by

My collection of sc flashcards

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.