Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 27 Jul 2014, 20:49

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42)

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2010
Posts: 225
Location: Boston
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 77 [1] , given: 5

My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 10:43
1
This post received
KUDOS
So I've been told I should make a post here about my successful quest to break the 750 barrier on the GMAT. I'm not sure how interesting of a story it'll be, but here's a little recap about my journey and accomplishing my score of 760!

Who I am

While I won't go so far as to say it's totally unique, I probably have a slightly atypical background. I'm 26 years old (okay, 27, but my birthday was the day after I took the GMAT) and have been in the workforce for about 5 and a half years. I graduated from Tufts, where I had a math major and a music minor. My dream was to be a pro musician, a rock star, a pioneer of electric bass, etc etc. I had wanted to go to college for music, but my parents wisely convinced me to get a degree in something more useful, and then pursue a music career, using my degree as a fallback should things not pan out.

Which is what I did. I'll be blunt: I slacked in college. I graduated by the seat of my pants with a 3.0 GPA, and barely did any career research, knowing - absolutely convinced - that I was going to become a famous musician. (FWIW, I was and am still excellent at my instrument) My plan was to find a job to pay the bills and focus on my band, which I had been in for three years at the time, and was starting to take off somewhat. I found a temp position in operations at an investment bank in Boston, which led to a better operations position six months down the line. I've been with the same company ever since.

I probably don't need to say that music didn't work out. The band from college continued strong for another year, playing some high-profile shows and opening for some national acts, but never quite breaking out into the mainstream or getting major label interest. Our guitar player and primary creative force graduated from school and moved to NYC to eventually go to law school. The band broke up, and while I've been in several bands since then, I have yet to experience the same level of success.

2009 rolled around, and I started getting antsy, wanting to do something with my life. My band situation was stagnant, my professional life was unsatisfying and leading nowhere, and I decided I had reached the point where I needed to focus on getting a real career. The problem was... what? I never really spent much time figuring out what I wanted to do with my math degree, outside of the small amount of research I did before graduating - research that included operations research analyst and actuary. And when my bandmate commented to me on a friend who had just passed an actuary exam, I decided mostly on a whim that I was going to become an actuary. I won't delve into this experience too much, because this is entirely too long already, but the long and short of it is I struggled mightily with the first exam before passing it last November, then passed the second exam in May of this year, before coming to the realization that I really, really, REALLY did not want to be an actuary.

I found myself rethinking my life again, somewhat depressed about being stuck in a dead-end operations job where I'm up for a promotion into management that never seems to come, and heard someone talking about getting an MBA. A light bulb went off. I had never thought about it before, but I've always been interested in business, so I started doing research. Lots of it. Tons of it. I spent more hours researching the MBA, schools, the GMAT, and possible career paths over the next month at work than I did actual work. And I was hooked. This was it - this was what I wanted to do. I was WAY more excited about going back to school for my MBA than I ever was about becoming an actuary. I spent some time deciding on part-time vs. full-time, finally concluding that I want to go all the way with this and do a full-time degree. With my passions ignited, and with the support and encouragement of my girlfriend and my parents, I stopped studying for actuary exam #3 and began going for the GMAT.

GMAT Prepping

I was confident. I had two actuary exams under my belt - the GMAT should be a piece of cake! In terms of the difficulty of the material covered, actuary exams are on a totally different level than the GMAT. But the type of thinking that the GMAT requires is completely different, and presents its own unique challenges (and obviously there's no verbal in an actuary exam!). I was (and am still) aiming high, wanting to get into a top-10 or 15 school, so I knew I had to get a 700+ GMAT. But I really wanted to break 750, mostly because I hoped it would at least partially make up for my subpar undergrad GPA. I began by taking a free Kaplan practice exam, before doing any studying, just to see how I would do on it. This was in early August. I got a 630. It was not a CAT exam, so I had no idea how accurate it actually was, but considering I hadn't done a lick of studying, I was pleased. I also went hunting on the internet to see if there were any GMAT forums similar to the actuary forum I used to help study for those exams - guess where I ended up?

After the diagnostic exam, I ordered the 11th edition of the Official Guide, while spending a ton of time on these boards answering questions. When the book came, I dove right in, starting out with the diagnostics tests at the beginning of the book and then working through each section one by one. I marked every problem I got wrong or had difficulty with so I could go back and review them later on. This took up most of my September, if I remember correctly. I was still doing problems on the boards, as well, especially during downtime at work. I was basically following the strategy I used for the actuary exams, which is practice, practice, and practice some more.

When I was done with the entire book, I took my first practice exam. It was GMATPrep, and I got a 730. I was obviously very happy with that result. I continued my studying completely using GMATClub, doing problems posted here, math problem sets from Bunuel's profile, the brutal sentence correction set, and as many of the GMATClub Tests as I could. I took GMATPrep #2 a week later, getting a 770. I was THRILLED, and my confidence was through the roof. This is now early-mid October, and I felt completely ready to take the exam. My only problem was that I didn't have the money for it.

So I kept studying. The process was basically the same, though I was doing more of the Club Tests and reviewing old problems I had gotten wrong. I began identifying my biggest weaknesses. Reading comprehension was giving me a lot of trouble and I didn't know why. For math, mixture and rate problems were my biggest foils, and the trickier geometry and coordinate problems were giving me trouble too. So I focused on them, doing as much practice as I could to really improve my weaknesses. My third practice exam was a step back - I took the free Manhattan GMAT exam, getting "only" a 700, with a verbal score of around 35. This shook me up quite a bit, but I did the only thing I could: plow forward and keep studying.

A few weeks later, practice exam # 4 (Knewton) was a 750, and I finally got the money to register for the exam. At this point I had completed every free GMATClub test, and having reached the threshold for access to all of the tests, I had also done most of the verbals and several of the maths. I registered to take the exam on December 3, the day before my birthday. I had less than two weeks to go to tighten up my knowledge. I took GMATPrep a third time (getting almost no repeat questions) a week before the real thing, getting a 750. I took the rest of the verbal tests and as many math ones as I could. The week of the exam, I did relatively poorly on the GMATClub tests, getting 10+ wrong multiple times. My confidence was getting shaky, and I started wondering if I wasn't as ready as I thought. But that kind of thinking is pointless and counterproductive, and I went into the exam knowing I had gotten 700 on every single practice exam, and knowing that I would do the same on the real thing.

Exam day

My exam was scheduled for 8 am Friday morning, right around the corner from where I work. I took a half day and got there about 10 minutes early. Everything went smoothly, and before I knew it, there I was ready to begin the analysis of an argument essay. I don't think I'm allowed to say what the topics were, so I'll just say that I felt I wrote a really strong analysis of an argument, but a really weak analysis of an issue. On the issue essay, I started off writing one way, then realized my arguments sucked and started over, arguing the opposite viewpoint! I had wasted ten minutes and ended up writing a shorter essay than I had hoped, only really using two points of evidence and writing a lot of BS. Overall, I thought I had nailed the first essay while writing a subpar second essay.

I skipped the first optional break and went straight to the quant section. Although I have very good verbal skills, obviously quant is my strength with my math background. I had spent a lot more time studying quant, as well, since it's much easier to study specific topics, and because there are more resources available here to study quant.

So, needless to say, I was pretty rattled when I found the quant section INSANELY DIFFICULT.

I found myself staring at problems that I had no clue how to solve. I found myself spending 2.5 minutes solving a problem, only to find that my answer wasn't one of the choices. I found myself guessing - not just once or twice, but numerous times. And I found myself with two and a half minutes left to answer the last two problems. I SCRAMBLED to finish them before running out of time, and I think I had about ten seconds left before finishing.

I was panicking. This wasn't what I expected. I had never seen problems like those before, and I thought I had prepared for everything! I knew I was bombing it. I suddenly found myself wondering if I was going to walk out of there with a 600, needing to take the GMAT again. I took the second break and went to the bathroom, splashed cold water on my face, took a deep breath, and told myself to calm down. What's done is done, and all I can do now is go back out there and ace the verbal section.

And I did. The verbal section felt much easier, and I raced through it with half an hour to spare. Now, on all the practice tests and most of the verbal Club tests, I always had a ton of time to spare when I finished, so I made a conscious effort to take my time, slow down, and really think about every problem. I also did something on the RC problems which I never did while studying - took notes. I swear that it seriously helped me keep track of what I was reading. I highly recommend it.

I finished the verbal section, went through the questionnaire, and actually thought about not submitting my score for about 1.5 seconds before realizing how stupid that would be. I clicked through and covered my eyes while it calculated my score. I slowly moved my hand over, revealing a little bit of the screen at a time, until I saw the header "Percentage" and the number "99" under it. There it was: 760 overall, 42 on the verbal, and, amazingly, a 50 on the quant!

I was ecstatic. I let out a huge sigh of relief and fist pumped silently to myself. The very friendly proctor who gave me my printout joked that I needed to take it again because it was too easy for me, before wishing me luck on my applications. I called my parents and texted my girlfriend before going to work to brag a little.

Today I got my official score report and found that I got a perfect 6.0 on the AWA section as well. Obviously I was really surprised by that, because I thought my second essay was mostly garbage, but clearly the grading system disagreed!

What now? Closing thoughts and thank yous

So now I can move on to the application process. I'm currently enjoying not having to study - this is the first time in a year and a half that I haven't had to study relentlessly, and I'm not used to having all this free time. I have a lot of research and essay preparation to do, and I'm bound to still be around here, so if this ridiculously long-winded story didn't bore you to tears, you'll be able to follow my progress as I continue on my journey. I don't know yet what schools I'm definitely applying to, nor do I know exactly what I want to do. I'm very interested in marketing and brand management, but I've also been investigating other paths, like management consulting and investment management. I know there's a long road ahead of me, but I'm glad to have step one out of the way!

I can't thank GMATClub enough. I don't know if I would have been able to do this well if it wasn't for the vast amount of resources, discussion, advice and support this forum contains. I want to give a special thanks to Bunuel, whose problem set compilations and impeccable solutions to almost every question posted on the math boards helped me learn a tremendous amount. If you're struggling with quant - by all means, go to his profile and visit every single link in his signature! Also, chineseburned's guide to getting a 6.0 on the AWA, which is stickied on the AWA board, is an excellent guide for the essay portion of the exam. Follow it and you can't go wrong - but I wouldn't recommend starting over ten minutes in :)

The most important thing to keep in mind when studying for the GMAT is to never give up! Focus on your weaknesses, go back to old problems and do them again and again and again, until you know them cold. Practice as much as you can as often as you can. Do several practice exams. And try not to stress yourself out - the GMAT requires sharp, quick thinking, and putting more pressure on yourself will only diminish your performance.

If you read through this whole thing, thanks - it ended up being way longer than I expected, and I'm sorry for being so long-winded! Good luck to all future test-takers!
Kaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesKnewton GMAT Discount CodesManhattan GMAT Discount Codes
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Sep 2010
Posts: 216
Concentration: General Management, Finance
GPA: 3.59
WE: Corporate Finance (Entertainment and Sports)
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 33

GMAT Tests User
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 11:39
Great job. What other review sources did you use?

TehJay wrote:
So I've been told I should make a post here about my successful quest to break the 750 barrier on the GMAT. I'm not sure how interesting of a story it'll be, but here's a little recap about my journey and accomplishing my score of 760!

Who I am

While I won't go so far as to say it's totally unique, I probably have a slightly atypical background. I'm 26 years old (okay, 27, but my birthday was the day after I took the GMAT) and have been in the workforce for about 5 and a half years. I graduated from Tufts, where I had a math major and a music minor. My dream was to be a pro musician, a rock star, a pioneer of electric bass, etc etc. I had wanted to go to college for music, but my parents wisely convinced me to get a degree in something more useful, and then pursue a music career, using my degree as a fallback should things not pan out.

Which is what I did. I'll be blunt: I slacked in college. I graduated by the seat of my pants with a 3.0 GPA, and barely did any career research, knowing - absolutely convinced - that I was going to become a famous musician. (FWIW, I was and am still excellent at my instrument) My plan was to find a job to pay the bills and focus on my band, which I had been in for three years at the time, and was starting to take off somewhat. I found a temp position in operations at an investment bank in Boston, which led to a better operations position six months down the line. I've been with the same company ever since.

I probably don't need to say that music didn't work out. The band from college continued strong for another year, playing some high-profile shows and opening for some national acts, but never quite breaking out into the mainstream or getting major label interest. Our guitar player and primary creative force graduated from school and moved to NYC to eventually go to law school. The band broke up, and while I've been in several bands since then, I have yet to experience the same level of success.

2009 rolled around, and I started getting antsy, wanting to do something with my life. My band situation was stagnant, my professional life was unsatisfying and leading nowhere, and I decided I had reached the point where I needed to focus on getting a real career. The problem was... what? I never really spent much time figuring out what I wanted to do with my math degree, outside of the small amount of research I did before graduating - research that included operations research analyst and actuary. And when my bandmate commented to me on a friend who had just passed an actuary exam, I decided mostly on a whim that I was going to become an actuary. I won't delve into this experience too much, because this is entirely too long already, but the long and short of it is I struggled mightily with the first exam before passing it last November, then passed the second exam in May of this year, before coming to the realization that I really, really, REALLY did not want to be an actuary.

I found myself rethinking my life again, somewhat depressed about being stuck in a dead-end operations job where I'm up for a promotion into management that never seems to come, and heard someone talking about getting an MBA. A light bulb went off. I had never thought about it before, but I've always been interested in business, so I started doing research. Lots of it. Tons of it. I spent more hours researching the MBA, schools, the GMAT, and possible career paths over the next month at work than I did actual work. And I was hooked. This was it - this was what I wanted to do. I was WAY more excited about going back to school for my MBA than I ever was about becoming an actuary. I spent some time deciding on part-time vs. full-time, finally concluding that I want to go all the way with this and do a full-time degree. With my passions ignited, and with the support and encouragement of my girlfriend and my parents, I stopped studying for actuary exam #3 and began going for the GMAT.

GMAT Prepping

I was confident. I had two actuary exams under my belt - the GMAT should be a piece of cake! In terms of the difficulty of the material covered, actuary exams are on a totally different level than the GMAT. But the type of thinking that the GMAT requires is completely different, and presents its own unique challenges (and obviously there's no verbal in an actuary exam!). I was (and am still) aiming high, wanting to get into a top-10 or 15 school, so I knew I had to get a 700+ GMAT. But I really wanted to break 750, mostly because I hoped it would at least partially make up for my subpar undergrad GPA. I began by taking a free Kaplan practice exam, before doing any studying, just to see how I would do on it. This was in early August. I got a 630. It was not a CAT exam, so I had no idea how accurate it actually was, but considering I hadn't done a lick of studying, I was pleased. I also went hunting on the internet to see if there were any GMAT forums similar to the actuary forum I used to help study for those exams - guess where I ended up?

After the diagnostic exam, I ordered the 11th edition of the Official Guide, while spending a ton of time on these boards answering questions. When the book came, I dove right in, starting out with the diagnostics tests at the beginning of the book and then working through each section one by one. I marked every problem I got wrong or had difficulty with so I could go back and review them later on. This took up most of my September, if I remember correctly. I was still doing problems on the boards, as well, especially during downtime at work. I was basically following the strategy I used for the actuary exams, which is practice, practice, and practice some more.

When I was done with the entire book, I took my first practice exam. It was GMATPrep, and I got a 730. I was obviously very happy with that result. I continued my studying completely using GMATClub, doing problems posted here, math problem sets from Bunuel's profile, the brutal sentence correction set, and as many of the GMATClub Tests as I could. I took GMATPrep #2 a week later, getting a 770. I was THRILLED, and my confidence was through the roof. This is now early-mid October, and I felt completely ready to take the exam. My only problem was that I didn't have the money for it.

So I kept studying. The process was basically the same, though I was doing more of the Club Tests and reviewing old problems I had gotten wrong. I began identifying my biggest weaknesses. Reading comprehension was giving me a lot of trouble and I didn't know why. For math, mixture and rate problems were my biggest foils, and the trickier geometry and coordinate problems were giving me trouble too. So I focused on them, doing as much practice as I could to really improve my weaknesses. My third practice exam was a step back - I took the free Manhattan GMAT exam, getting "only" a 700, with a verbal score of around 35. This shook me up quite a bit, but I did the only thing I could: plow forward and keep studying.

A few weeks later, practice exam # 4 (Knewton) was a 750, and I finally got the money to register for the exam. At this point I had completed every free GMATClub test, and having reached the threshold for access to all of the tests, I had also done most of the verbals and several of the maths. I registered to take the exam on December 3, the day before my birthday. I had less than two weeks to go to tighten up my knowledge. I took GMATPrep a third time (getting almost no repeat questions) a week before the real thing, getting a 750. I took the rest of the verbal tests and as many math ones as I could. The week of the exam, I did relatively poorly on the GMATClub tests, getting 10+ wrong multiple times. My confidence was getting shaky, and I started wondering if I wasn't as ready as I thought. But that kind of thinking is pointless and counterproductive, and I went into the exam knowing I had gotten 700 on every single practice exam, and knowing that I would do the same on the real thing.

Exam day

My exam was scheduled for 8 am Friday morning, right around the corner from where I work. I took a half day and got there about 10 minutes early. Everything went smoothly, and before I knew it, there I was ready to begin the analysis of an argument essay. I don't think I'm allowed to say what the topics were, so I'll just say that I felt I wrote a really strong analysis of an argument, but a really weak analysis of an issue. On the issue essay, I started off writing one way, then realized my arguments sucked and started over, arguing the opposite viewpoint! I had wasted ten minutes and ended up writing a shorter essay than I had hoped, only really using two points of evidence and writing a lot of BS. Overall, I thought I had nailed the first essay while writing a subpar second essay.

I skipped the first optional break and went straight to the quant section. Although I have very good verbal skills, obviously quant is my strength with my math background. I had spent a lot more time studying quant, as well, since it's much easier to study specific topics, and because there are more resources available here to study quant.

So, needless to say, I was pretty rattled when I found the quant section INSANELY DIFFICULT.

I found myself staring at problems that I had no clue how to solve. I found myself spending 2.5 minutes solving a problem, only to find that my answer wasn't one of the choices. I found myself guessing - not just once or twice, but numerous times. And I found myself with two and a half minutes left to answer the last two problems. I SCRAMBLED to finish them before running out of time, and I think I had about ten seconds left before finishing.

I was panicking. This wasn't what I expected. I had never seen problems like those before, and I thought I had prepared for everything! I knew I was bombing it. I suddenly found myself wondering if I was going to walk out of there with a 600, needing to take the GMAT again. I took the second break and went to the bathroom, splashed cold water on my face, took a deep breath, and told myself to calm down. What's done is done, and all I can do now is go back out there and ace the verbal section.

And I did. The verbal section felt much easier, and I raced through it with half an hour to spare. Now, on all the practice tests and most of the verbal Club tests, I always had a ton of time to spare when I finished, so I made a conscious effort to take my time, slow down, and really think about every problem. I also did something on the RC problems which I never did while studying - took notes. I swear that it seriously helped me keep track of what I was reading. I highly recommend it.

I finished the verbal section, went through the questionnaire, and actually thought about not submitting my score for about 1.5 seconds before realizing how stupid that would be. I clicked through and covered my eyes while it calculated my score. I slowly moved my hand over, revealing a little bit of the screen at a time, until I saw the header "Percentage" and the number "99" under it. There it was: 760 overall, 42 on the verbal, and, amazingly, a 50 on the quant!

I was ecstatic. I let out a huge sigh of relief and fist pumped silently to myself. The very friendly proctor who gave me my printout joked that I needed to take it again because it was too easy for me, before wishing me luck on my applications. I called my parents and texted my girlfriend before going to work to brag a little.

Today I got my official score report and found that I got a perfect 6.0 on the AWA section as well. Obviously I was really surprised by that, because I thought my second essay was mostly garbage, but clearly the grading system disagreed!

What now? Closing thoughts and thank yous

So now I can move on to the application process. I'm currently enjoying not having to study - this is the first time in a year and a half that I haven't had to study relentlessly, and I'm not used to having all this free time. I have a lot of research and essay preparation to do, and I'm bound to still be around here, so if this ridiculously long-winded story didn't bore you to tears, you'll be able to follow my progress as I continue on my journey. I don't know yet what schools I'm definitely applying to, nor do I know exactly what I want to do. I'm very interested in marketing and brand management, but I've also been investigating other paths, like management consulting and investment management. I know there's a long road ahead of me, but I'm glad to have step one out of the way!

I can't thank GMATClub enough. I don't know if I would have been able to do this well if it wasn't for the vast amount of resources, discussion, advice and support this forum contains. I want to give a special thanks to Bunuel, whose problem set compilations and impeccable solutions to almost every question posted on the math boards helped me learn a tremendous amount. If you're struggling with quant - by all means, go to his profile and visit every single link in his signature! Also, chineseburned's guide to getting a 6.0 on the AWA, which is stickied on the AWA board, is an excellent guide for the essay portion of the exam. Follow it and you can't go wrong - but I wouldn't recommend starting over ten minutes in :)

The most important thing to keep in mind when studying for the GMAT is to never give up! Focus on your weaknesses, go back to old problems and do them again and again and again, until you know them cold. Practice as much as you can as often as you can. Do several practice exams. And try not to stress yourself out - the GMAT requires sharp, quick thinking, and putting more pressure on yourself will only diminish your performance.

If you read through this whole thing, thanks - it ended up being way longer than I expected, and I'm sorry for being so long-winded! Good luck to all future test-takers!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 08 Dec 2010
Posts: 10
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 1

Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 11:44
Very nice debrief TehJay! Best of luck on the research/application process as you continue on.

One quick thing; you mentioned:

Quote:
So, needless to say, I was pretty rattled when I found the quant section INSANELY DIFFICULT.

I found myself staring at problems that I had no clue how to solve. I found myself spending 2.5 minutes solving a problem, only to find that my answer wasn't one of the choices. I found myself guessing - not just once or twice, but numerous times. And I found myself with two and a half minutes left to answer the last two problems. I SCRAMBLED to finish them before running out of time, and I think I had about ten seconds left before finishing.


I'm curious if you could divulge what exactly gave you problems. Was it problem types that you have never seen before? Or was it variations of problem types that you hadn't practiced? If you could extrapolate on what and why it gave you problems, you could potentially save a lot of people from being surprised in the future.

Thanks, and once again, great debrief.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2010
Posts: 225
Location: Boston
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 5

Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 11:50
USCTrojan2006 wrote:
Great job. What other review sources did you use?


Honestly, the only book I purchased was the OG11. I considered picking up some Manhattan books, especially after getting the 700 on the third practice exam, but at the time I had been hoping to take the exam relatively soon and didn't want to delay it by going through another book or three. In retrospect, I would have had the time, and if I had to do it again I might still get a few of them. I've heard they're excellent. But I just used OG11 and all the resources at my disposal on this site.

plb wrote:
Very nice debrief TehJay! Best of luck on the research/application process as you continue on.

One quick thing; you mentioned:

Quote:
So, needless to say, I was pretty rattled when I found the quant section INSANELY DIFFICULT.

I found myself staring at problems that I had no clue how to solve. I found myself spending 2.5 minutes solving a problem, only to find that my answer wasn't one of the choices. I found myself guessing - not just once or twice, but numerous times. And I found myself with two and a half minutes left to answer the last two problems. I SCRAMBLED to finish them before running out of time, and I think I had about ten seconds left before finishing.


I'm curious if you could divulge what exactly gave you problems. Was it problem types that you have never seen before? Or was it variations of problem types that you hadn't practiced? If you could extrapolate on what and why it gave you problems, you could potentially save a lot of people from being surprised in the future.

Thanks, and once again, great debrief.


Hopefully this is kosher, since I'm not going into specifics. But one type of problem came up again and again and I never really focused on it while studying: percentages. I must have gotten ten very tricky percentage problems that really threw me for a loop. I can remember one specific geometry question that still makes no sense to me. But if I could go back and study another topic in depth, I would work on percentages.

Considering that I got a 50q, I figured that I was being thrown some of the most difficult problems in the database, which would probably explain why I struggled so much and still did so well. Either that or I got REALLY lucky with some guesses, but I'm just going to ignore that possibility. :)
Ms. Big Fat Panda
Ms. Big Fat Panda
User avatar
Status: Biting Nails Into Oblivion
Joined: 09 Jun 2010
Posts: 1855
Followers: 330

Kudos [?]: 1338 [0], given: 194

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 12:23
Haha, excellent debrief and one of the best ones I can relate to, probably. I had huge issues with timing on verbal. I used to finish the section with 30 mins to spare and get a 38-40 and miss almost all the RCs cos I was just damn bored and wanted to be done with them.

But I sucked it up and started taking notes on RC and voilà, I was much more well paced (I still finish with 20 mins to spare mostly) and my verbal went from 40 to 47 on my last GMAT prep.

What I find curious is the fact that on my GMAT prep Q50 V47 was a 770 and on the GMAT Q50 V42 is a 760. The ranges baffle me. I just hope the verbal is getting easier. And as for math, if I get a shit ton of percentage problems, I'll gladly take them :D

Congratulations again and good luck!

Posted from my mobile device Image
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar
Status: battlecruiser, operational...
Joined: 25 Apr 2010
Posts: 985
Schools: Carey '16
GMAT 1: Q V
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 91 [0], given: 71

GMAT Tests User
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 15:02
longest debrief ever but pretty legit.

Image
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Fighting the beast.
Joined: 25 Oct 2010
Posts: 182
Schools: Pitt, Oregon, LBS...
Followers: 28

Kudos [?]: 250 [0], given: 36

GMAT Tests User
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 18:55
Great job TJ!
p.s. How did you plan to be the pioneer of the electric bass? ;)
_________________

[highlight]Monster collection of Verbal questions (RC, CR, and SC)[/highlight]
massive-collection-of-verbal-questions-sc-rc-and-cr-106195.html#p832142

[highlight]Massive collection of thousands of Data Sufficiency and Problem Solving questions and answers:[/highlight]
1001-ds-questions-file-106193.html#p832133

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Mar 2010
Posts: 20
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 2

GMAT Tests User
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 08 Dec 2010, 20:00
Congratz for the massive score..How did you find GMAT verbal and Quant questions in comparison with questions of GMAT prep , MGMAT , knewton and other CAT tests..
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2010
Posts: 225
Location: Boston
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 77 [0], given: 5

Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2010, 06:05
MisterEko wrote:
Great job TJ!
p.s. How did you plan to be the pioneer of the electric bass? ;)


Well, I wanted to be the next Jaco Pastorius, obviously :)

sv76 wrote:
Congratz for the massive score..How did you find GMAT verbal and Quant questions in comparison with questions of GMAT prep , MGMAT , knewton and other CAT tests..


MGMAT was by far the most difficult practice test I took, and I think it was much more difficult than the real thing. GMATPrep seems like it was in line with what really happened. It's hard for me to gauge accurately, though, because I had so much difficulty with the quant section on the real thing. It seemed even harder than the GMATClub math tests, which can be brutal.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Oct 2010
Posts: 92
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 10

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42) [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2010, 11:32
Nice debrief
thanks
Re: My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42)   [#permalink] 11 Dec 2010, 11:32
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
9 GMAT Debrief - 760 (Q50, V42) Zarthul 22 11 Jul 2011, 15:33
5 My GMAT Experience - 760 (Q50, V42) AWA 6.0 he4dhuntr 17 23 Apr 2010, 05:22
10 Experts publish their posts in the topic GMAT 760 (Q50 V42) kokofrdel 15 28 Jan 2010, 05:35
6 My experience: 760 - Q50 - V42 christian79 11 15 Feb 2008, 08:54
My GMAT experience : 760 (Q50, V42) mlohani 6 18 Oct 2006, 22:47
Display posts from previous: Sort by

My GMAT experience - 760 (Q50, V42)

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderator: TGC



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.