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Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the

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Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2009, 10:24
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Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2009, 10:35
my ans = E
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2009, 15:05
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manojgmat wrote:
my ans = E


we want your reasoning, not yout ans.

By the way, is not E
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2009, 18:48
I think it's B.
In the premise:
"Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution"

This means the clues that the companion uses is the right one (because the detective also use this clue to solve), but the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution.
If we can find his mistakes (find how/where he wrongly infers), we can get the solution. This is what B says.

Hope this is the right answer.
Please post the OA. Thanks.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2009, 22:13
Agree it's B. Since the dull companion helps readers solve the mystery, we can conclude that readers do so by spotting the mistakes of the dull companion.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 27 Sep 2009, 23:29
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.


I see that only A really supported by info in the passage.
Others are questionable for me.
I will go with A.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 29 Sep 2009, 06:04
Why not C?

"gives readers a chance to solve the mystery" tells me that enough clues are given to the readers to solve the mystery.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 29 Sep 2009, 06:23
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Will choose B plz provide the OA
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 29 Sep 2009, 12:19
fall2009 wrote:
I think it's B.
In the premise:
"Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution"

This means the clues that the companion uses is the right one (because the detective also use this clue to solve), but the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution.
If we can find his mistakes (find how/where he wrongly infers), we can get the solution. This is what B says.

Hope this is the right answer.
Please post the OA. Thanks.


I agree with B and this explanation.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 30 Sep 2009, 20:57
i would have gone for A.

Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.

The passage says the above so definetly i can conclude with A.
b) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story. I did not like that often solve. Too strong to take. The passge no where supports it.
c)Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery. Does not say anything about it.
d)(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion. ( We are not sure about diversion).Out of scope
e)The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution. To strong to say it.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2009, 07:13
C for me.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2009, 08:02
The answer should be A.

B -> goes to a complete extreme saying all mystery readers can solve the case using dull detective's reasoning fallacies.....
C -> This is also a close choice, but I eliminated it, because, from the passage we cant firmly get a conclusion that, the reader can solve it, the last line "gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution" does the damage
D -> not true at all, since the last line of the stimuli specifically puts it forth
E -> again a fallacy, not supported by the stimuli, since the stimuli says the trainee detective puts the pieces of puzzle wrongly, it doesnt say he creates new pieces of puzzle

Please correct my line of reasoning if I have been mistaken somewhere
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2009, 16:39
IMO A

OA?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 14:55
Answer is B
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 16:52
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Premise # 1: Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion.

Premise # 2: Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution.

Conclusion: The author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.

(A) Wrong: Because, talks about "most mystery stories" and "detective". Nothing about the dull companion.

(B) Wrong: Becasue, talks about "mystery readers". Not the readers of the mystery stories.

(C) Wrong: Because, talks about "some mystery stories".

(D) Wrong: Beacuse, nothing about the authors' conclusion "why to include the companion" and "diverting the readers".

(E) Correct: Supports the conclusion of inclusion of the companion and diversion of the readers.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 17:05
going with A

the question asks which one is supported by the passage, not the other way around...

Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story. -correct, it says "often mystery stories ....."
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story. not this because didn't mention whether readers solve mystery by doing that.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery. -not this because clues are given in article for detective to infer the solution, didnt mention readers.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion. -didn't mention this
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution. -didn't mention this.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 17:13
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story. - This is true anyways, but this does not support the argument.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story. - This is not indicated anywhere in the passage that authors can solve the mystery by spotting the errors of dull companion. So not correct.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery. - This might be true for "some" of the mystery stories, but it does not support the information given in the passage.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion. - Correct. The actions of detective "rarely" divert readers from actions of the dull companion. This is the motive of the mystery story. But the word "rarely" also indicates that sometimes readers might also solve the mystery, if not always.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution. - This is anyways mentioned in the passage above.


IMO D. OA?
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 17:51
Conclusion : The author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.

(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story - The conclusion is not concerned about featuring of a detective who solves mystery
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story - This is the best choice because it states how readers can solve the mystery.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery - We are not talking about mystery stories giving clues to infer.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion - We are not talking about actions.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution - Close choice but only covers one part of conclusion i.e. diversion from correct solution. It does not tell anything how to solve the mystery.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 18:22
noboru wrote:
Mystery stories often feature a brilliant detective and the detective’s dull companion. Clues are presented in the story, and the companion wrongly infers an inaccurate solution to the mystery using the same clues that the detective uses to deduce the correct solution. Thus, the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery while also diverting them from the correct solution.
Which one of the following is most strongly supported by the information above?
(A) Most mystery stories feature a brilliant detective who solves the mystery presented in the story.
(B) Mystery readers often solve the mystery in a story simply by spotting the mistakes in the reasoning of the detective’s dull companion in that story.
(C) Some mystery stories give readers enough clues to infer the correct solution to the mystery.
(D) The actions of the brilliant detective in a mystery story rarely divert readers from the actions of the detective’s dull companion.
(E) The detective’s dull companion in a mystery story generally uncovers the misleading clues that divert readers from the mystery’s correct solution.


(A) Sounds almost right, but I wouldn't consider this answer choice the most strongly supported by the stimulus
(B) Not supported by what's been presented in the stimulus
(C) Best option ---because of--- "Clues are presented in the story" + "the author’s strategy of including the dull companion gives readers a chance to solve the mystery"
(D) No mention of this anywhere in the stimulus. In such "most strongly supported" questions, we cannot bring in outside information. The answer must be based on the facts presented in the stimulus. Here, it talks only about diversion from the correct solution (not from the actions of the detective's dull companion).
(E) Close, however the clues per se are not misleading. The interpretation though (made by the dull companion) is.
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Re: Sherlock Holmes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2009, 18:35
Looks like nobody liked D other than me. What is OA anyways?
Re: Sherlock Holmes   [#permalink] 07 Oct 2009, 18:35
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