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Nationality question!

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Nationality question! [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2006, 00:13
How important is Nationality in the admissions process? Suppose a person is orginially from India but now is a citizen of some unknown nation, does that isolate the candidate from the INDIAN bucket?

Any insights?
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Re: Nationality question! [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2006, 13:06
sm176811 wrote:
How important is Nationality in the admissions process? Suppose a person is orginially from India but now is a citizen of some unknown nation, does that isolate the candidate from the INDIAN bucket?

Any insights?


sm176811,

Interesting question. Assuming that he has been a citizen of that unknown country for some time, say, more than just a couple of years, then he would have enough cultural experiences in that country to talk about how his new country had shaped him. If these influences and experiences were interesting and distinctive enough, he will certainly have helped himself stand out from his "typical" countrymen. If he has a few more major "uniqueness factors" like this (such as unusual job/industry or hobby), then he will have a significant advantage over his "typical" countrymen. However, schools would still consider him as an Indian -- just a very interesting and unusual one. Same with an American who relocated to Tibet when he was 17 and became a Tibetan citizen. He would be "perceived" as American, but as completely unlike typical American applicants -- which would help him. Note that none of this is about "quotas" on nationalities; it's about standing out...

Good luck,

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 [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2006, 13:48
Thanks Paul for the insights!
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Nov 2006, 17:13
sm176811 wrote:
Thanks Paul for the insights!


You're welcome.

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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2006, 12:41
Quote:
Note that none of this is about "quotas" on nationalities; it's about standing out...

Paul,

Do schools have quotas, or at least goals, when it comes to nationalities? How much of an asset can a unique nationality be? Some schools have an easier time attracting internationals than others. For example Kellogg only has 26% international and only about 5% European students. Are they likely trying to raise those numbers and if so, how far would they be willing to go out of their way to admit lets say, a Swiss, Finnish, or Hungarian applicant?
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2006, 16:34
dukes wrote:
Quote:
Note that none of this is about "quotas" on nationalities; it's about standing out...

Paul,

Do schools have quotas, or at least goals, when it comes to nationalities? How much of an asset can a unique nationality be? Some schools have an easier time attracting internationals than others. For example Kellogg only has 26% international and only about 5% European students. Are they likely trying to raise those numbers and if so, how far would they be willing to go out of their way to admit lets say, a Swiss, Finnish, or Hungarian applicant?


Dukes,

You ask tough questions. They do not have quotas--period. They want a well-balanced and highly diverse class. A unique nationality can be a big asset, but it is only one asset. Suppose you have one significant "weakness"--an ordinary GMAT score, weak community, or a highly typical industry or career pace--then you will need *several* assets to offset that weakness, and unique nationality would be *one* of them. But successful applicants at top schools should be able to offer *several* such assets: like strong community, difficult personal story (obstacle overcome), unusual passion/hobby, unusual industry or unusual leadership profile at work. So if they were comparing a Swiss, Finn, or Hungarian with a Frenchman, German, or Brit--who were otherwise identical--they would go "out of their way" to admit the S, F, or H, simply because they will add a bit more variety to the class. But if the Frenchman, German, or Brit had one or two more assets than you, then your nationality might not be enough to convince them to give you the edge.

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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2006, 17:28
Quote:
Dukes,

You ask tough questions. They do not have quotas--period. They want a well-balanced and highly diverse class. A unique nationality can be a big asset, but it is only one asset. Suppose you have one significant "weakness"--an ordinary GMAT score, weak community, or a highly typical industry or career pace--then you will need *several* assets to offset that weakness, and unique nationality would be *one* of them. But successful applicants at top schools should be able to offer *several* such assets: like strong community, difficult personal story (obstacle overcome), unusual passion/hobby, unusual industry or unusual leadership profile at work. So if they were comparing a Swiss, Finn, or Hungarian with a Frenchman, German, or Brit--who were otherwise identical--they would go "out of their way" to admit the S, F, or H, simply because they will add a bit more variety to the class. But if the Frenchman, German, or Brit had one or two more assets than you, then your nationality might not be enough to convince them to give you the edge.


Thanks Paul.

Your post actually raised another question for me. To what degree will schools "forgive" international applicants for not having a significant community or extracurricular record? Where I grew up this just wasn't part of the culture the way it is in the US. Montauk addresses this a little bit and basically says that schools *may* not expect to see as much in this category as they do for Americans. Do you have any thoughts on that? Obviously it’s never good when you start having to make excuses for certain parts of your record, regardless what the reason is.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Dec 2006, 13:10
dukes wrote:
Quote:
Dukes,

You ask tough questions. They do not have quotas--period. They want a well-balanced and highly diverse class. A unique nationality can be a big asset, but it is only one asset. Suppose you have one significant "weakness"--an ordinary GMAT score, weak community, or a highly typical industry or career pace--then you will need *several* assets to offset that weakness, and unique nationality would be *one* of them. But successful applicants at top schools should be able to offer *several* such assets: like strong community, difficult personal story (obstacle overcome), unusual passion/hobby, unusual industry or unusual leadership profile at work. So if they were comparing a Swiss, Finn, or Hungarian with a Frenchman, German, or Brit--who were otherwise identical--they would go "out of their way" to admit the S, F, or H, simply because they will add a bit more variety to the class. But if the Frenchman, German, or Brit had one or two more assets than you, then your nationality might not be enough to convince them to give you the edge.


Thanks Paul.

Your post actually raised another question for me. To what degree will schools "forgive" international applicants for not having a significant community or extracurricular record? Where I grew up this just wasn't part of the culture the way it is in the US. Montauk addresses this a little bit and basically says that schools *may* not expect to see as much in this category as they do for Americans. Do you have any thoughts on that? Obviously it’s never good when you start having to make excuses for certain parts of your record, regardless what the reason is.


Dukes,

I agree with Montauk: the may not hold you to as high a bar, but you certainly won't be scoring points with them by lacking that component. So rather than a big negative, it's maybe just a negative. But it's still a negative.

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 [#permalink] New post 05 Dec 2006, 13:10
Thanks Paul.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2006, 13:51
dukes wrote:
Thanks Paul.


You're welcome.

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