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Natural Mate Selection

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Natural Mate Selection [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2013, 23:03
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  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

66% (02:41) correct 34% (01:57) wrong based on 253 sessions
Naturalist: One of the most powerful forces of natural selection is that exercised by individuals in choosing a mate. Among most insects and vertebrates, males do the courting and females do the choosing. This division of labor makes sense. Sperm are less costly, energetically speaking, than eggs and are always more abundant. All other factors being equal, therefore, a male optimizes his contribution to the gene pool by mating as frequently as possible. On the other hand, a female seeks quality—often measured by the physical appearance of the male—rather than quantity, because her energy investment in each act of reproduction is typically greater than the male’s investment.

Which of the following is a logical consequence of the ideas offered by the author?

a) This explains the sometimes violent skirmishes between males competing for territory.
b) Often, the female of the species has little or no use for the male after conception or fertilization, and in some cases she kills the male.
c) This process of sexual selection is more apt to produce striking visual and other adaptations among males than among females.
d) Therefore, in any given species, the females will outnumber the males.
e) This, in part, explains why breeding females often cluster for protection of their offspring.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Natural Mate Selection [#permalink] New post 27 Aug 2013, 00:10
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Important Fact: All other factors being equal, therefore, a male optimizes his contribution to the gene pool by mating as frequently as possible. On the other hand, a female seeks quality—often measured by the physical appearance of the male—rather than quantity, because her energy investment in each act of reproduction is typically greater than the male’s investment.

Which of the following is a logical consequence of the ideas offered by the author?

This question belongs to “MUST BE TRUE” family, so fact test is the most important. Any answer that does not pass the fact test is wrong.

ANALYZE EACH ANSWER:

a) This explains the sometimes violent skirmishes between males competing for territory.
Wrong. Out of scope.

b) Often, the female of the species has little or no use for the male after conception or fertilization, and in some cases she kills the male.
Wrong. Out of scope.

c) This process of sexual selection is more apt to produce striking visual and other adaptations among males than among females.
Correct. The highlight part clearly explains why physical appearance of the male is important.

d) Therefore, in any given species, the females will outnumber the males.
Wrong. Out of scope. Nothing about which species is outnumber the other.

e) This, in part, explains why breeding females often cluster for protection of their offspring.
Wrong. Out of scope.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Natural Mate Selection [#permalink] New post 04 Jul 2015, 03:10
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Re: Natural Mate Selection   [#permalink] 04 Jul 2015, 03:10
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