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Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor

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Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2007, 13:27
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

75% (01:47) correct 25% (01:18) wrong based on 74 sessions
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust
to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.
A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social security which were largely their responsibility

Ok, my question is when to use the 'gerund' form, what rules to follow?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by fameatop on 24 Sep 2013, 04:13, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2007, 13:43
Quote:
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought
recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust
to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social
security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.

A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security which were largely their responsibility


The answer is B.

C, D & E can be eliminated because they use the gerund (taking) instead of the to-infinitive form (to take).

A can be eliminated because in the phrase '...that were in large measure what they had been responsible for...', 'they' is ambiguous and seems to refer to the 'others of the Roosevelt brain trust'.

You're left with B.

Here's a link to a website explaining the grammatical use of a gerund.

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_verbals.html
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Re: SC - First Lady [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2007, 20:29
alimad wrote:
Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins sought
recognition by the press, and both cautiously allowed others of the Roosevelt brain trust
to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief, and social
security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for.


A. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they had been responsible for
B. to take credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
C. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security for which the two women were in large measure responsible
D. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security that were in large measure what they were responsible for
E. taking credit for the genesis of historic programs in public employment, relief,
and social security which were largely their responsibility

Ok, my question is when to use the 'gerund' form, what rules to follow?


B.

"taking" vs. to take. to take is needed b/c the first lady and the secretary allowed others to take, not taking.

Elim CDE.

A: they has no clear referent. could be the others or the two women.

B: fixes A's problem with referents.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2012, 07:35
Expert's post
Though I am late, but can't tolerate the wrong information presented in the above post.
The "taking" in C,D,E is not a gerund, but a participle and that too in an incorrect usage.
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Re: Neither First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt nor Secretary of Labor   [#permalink] 20 Oct 2012, 07:35
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