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New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan

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New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2011, 13:22
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

35% (01:40) correct 64% (01:18) wrong based on 352 sessions
New genetic evidence — together with recent studies of elephants’ skeletons, tusks, and other anatomical features — provide compelling support for classifying Africa’s forest elephants and its savanna elephants as separate species.

A. provide compelling support for classifying
B. provide compelling support for the classification of
C. provides compelling support to the classification of
D. provides compelling support for classifying
E. provides compelling support to classify
[Reveal] Spoiler:
call for explanation for official answer!!!
really thanks!!!

Happy New Year! :-D
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: call for explanation!!! [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2011, 13:59
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Hi there! I'm happy to help with this. :)

First of all, the subject of the sentence is "New genetic evidence" --- what follows, set off by dashes, is a big prepositional phrase. The subject is singular, so the verb should be singular ----- "New genetic evidence . . . provides . . ." That eliminates (A) & (B).

Next, the idiomatic use of the word "support": in English, we say that one gives/shows support for something. That's natural and idiomatic. To say, "I give my support to something" sounds less natural, more like the kind of mistake someone learning English might make.

Thus, the best answer is (D), singular verb + "for" instead of "to."

Does that make sense? Let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :)
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Re: call for explanation!!! [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2011, 14:00
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"evidence" is the subject so you will need the singular version of provide which is "provides".

"Evidence provides..."

"Support for..." is the correct idiomatic usage in this case. You always provide "support for something" (in this case the elephants are the something) and provide "support to someone" (there is no someone in the end of this sentence).

Therefore "provides compelling support for classifying..." is correct.

(D) :)
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Re: call for explanation!!! [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2012, 06:05
singular verb reqd so eliminate A n B
Support for correct idiom so
IMO D s d correct ans..
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 17 Sep 2013, 10:42
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Bumping for review and further discussion*.

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Theory on Subject/Verb agreement: subject-verb-agreement-159965.html
Questions on Subject/Verb agreement to practice: search.php?search_id=tag&tag_id=131

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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2013, 13:13
For classifying?
Do u think for [verb]ing is a correct form?
E seems to b d correct answer. To classify

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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 01:26
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The "tricks" to this question are:
1. Get the right verb tense for provide, eliminating A & B.
2. Look at what the sentence is saying. It's talking about providing support FOR (aka giving reasons for) doing something, not providing support TO someone who is classifying or TO the act of classification. This eliminates C & E.

mikemcgarry wrote:
Next, the idiomatic use of the word "support": in English, we say that one gives/shows support for something. That's natural and idiomatic. To say, "I give my support to something" sounds less natural, more like the kind of mistake someone learning English might make.
I agree with Mike that support for is more common than support to, but both "support for" and "support to" can be grammatical (e.g. "Hillary Clinton gave her support to the Obama campaign.").

I think Mike's point is also a bit confusing because he's using the words give and show rather than the word in the question: provide.

For example:
(1) The government provides financial support for Mapplethorpe's "art". <-- The gov gives money to Mapplethorpe to make his art.
(1a)*The government provides financial support to Mapplethorpe's "art". <-- They give money to the art? Ungrammatical!
(2) The government provides financial support to the homeless. <-- The gov gives money to homeless people.
(3) Iran provides support to the PLA. <-- Iran helps the PLA in some way.
(4)?Iran provides support for the PLA. <-- Iran helps the PLA, but in this sentence we really need a modifier like military or financial for support.
(5)?Iran gives support to the PLA. <-- Iran gives some sort of physical (tangible) help to the PLA. Probably OK without a modifier.
(6) Iran gives military support to the PLA. <-- Crystal clear.

Some might say that Sentence (5) could be better written as:
(5a) Iran supports the PLA.
but that may change the meaning of the sentence; supporting something/someone ("I support free speech.") and giving support to someone/thing ("Iraq gives support to al Qaeda.") aren't necessarily the same thing.
(5b) Iran supports the PLA financially.
would be great.
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2013, 01:38
Idioms:
Provide support FOR something/ somebody.
Support somebody TO do something.

New genetic evidence — together with recent studies of elephants’ skeletons, tusks, and other anatomical features — provide compelling support for classifying Africa’s forest elephants and its savanna elephants as separate species.

A. provide compelling support for classifying
Wrong. S-V agreement.

B. provide compelling support for the classification of
Wrong. S-V agreement.

C. provides compelling support to the classification of
Wrong. Idiom problem.

D. provides compelling support for classifying
Correct.

E. provides compelling support to classify
Wrong. Idiom problem.

Hope it helps.
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2014, 08:40
pqhai wrote:
Idioms:
Provide support FOR something/ somebody.
Support somebody TO do something.

New genetic evidence — together with recent studies of elephants’ skeletons, tusks, and other anatomical features — provide compelling support for classifying Africa’s forest elephants and its savanna elephants as separate species.

A. provide compelling support for classifying
Wrong. S-V agreement.

B. provide compelling support for the classification of
Wrong. S-V agreement.

C. provides compelling support to the classification of
Wrong. Idiom problem.

D. provides compelling support for classifying
Correct.

E. provides compelling support to classify
Wrong. Idiom problem.

Hope it helps.


I don't get it. Classify is doing something, right?..then why isn't 'support to' is correct?
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2014, 09:43
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Klenex wrote:

I don't get it. Classify is doing something, right?..then why isn't 'support to' is correct?

Dear Klenex,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

This is an idiom. Idioms are funny --- they don't always follow logic.

If support is directed simply toward a person or an activity, then we use "for" ---
... provide support for that political party ...
... provide support for the indigenous people ....
... provide support for struggling students ....

In these cases, the object of "for" would be a direct object if the word "support" were changed from a noun to a verb
They support that political party.
They support the indigenous people.
They support the struggling students.

Now, if the object of support is a person, we might add an infinitive of purpose to explain the purpose of the support. See:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/lessons/1046-in ... of-purpose
I provide support for underprivileged children to attend private school.
I provide support for the candidate to win her election.
I provide support for veterans to locate medical services.

If there's no object, this sounds awkward.
I provide support to locate medical services.
Something is missing there --- who is getting the support?
Much in the same way
....provides compelling support to classify ....
This also sounds awkward, because the structure makes us expect to hear something about who is given this support.

Also, notice another idiom here. If the word "support" is a verb, and the object of the support is the direct object, then the purpose of the support is given in the form "in" + [gerund]. I believe this is the only verb in which purpose is shown with this structure rather than with an infinitive of purpose.
I support underprivileged children in attending private school.
I support the candidate in winning her election.
I support veterans in locating medical services.

This "in" + [gerund] structure can also be used with "support" as a noun.

Here's a free idiom ebook you may find helpful.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/

Please let me know if you any further questions.

Mike :-)
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2014, 02:46
mikemcgarry wrote:
Klenex wrote:

I don't get it. Classify is doing something, right?..then why isn't 'support to' is correct?

Dear Klenex,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

This is an idiom. Idioms are funny --- they don't always follow logic.

If support is directed simply toward a person or an activity, then we use "for" ---
... provide support for that political party ...
... provide support for the indigenous people ....
... provide support for struggling students ....

In these cases, the object of "for" would be a direct object if the word "support" were changed from a noun to a verb
They support that political party.
They support the indigenous people.
They support the struggling students.

Now, if the object of support is a person, we might add an infinitive of purpose to explain the purpose of the support. See:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/lessons/1046-in ... of-purpose
I provide support for underprivileged children to attend private school.
I provide support for the candidate to win her election.
I provide support for veterans to locate medical services.

If there's no object, this sounds awkward.
I provide support to locate medical services.
Something is missing there --- who is getting the support?
Much in the same way
....provides compelling support to classify ....
This also sounds awkward, because the structure makes us expect to hear something about who is given this support.

Also, notice another idiom here. If the word "support" is a verb, and the object of the support is the direct object, then the purpose of the support is given in the form "in" + [gerund]. I believe this is the only verb in which purpose is shown with this structure rather than with an infinitive of purpose.
I support underprivileged children in attending private school.
I support the candidate in winning her election.
I support veterans in locating medical services.

This "in" + [gerund] structure can also be used with "support" as a noun.

Here's a free idiom ebook you may find helpful.
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/

Please let me know if you any further questions.

Mike :-)


Thanks for the explanation. It's clear now.

Pls. give some examples where 'support to' is used..
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2014, 10:14
Expert's post
Klenex wrote:
Thanks for the explanation. It's clear now.

Pls. give some examples where 'support to' is used..

Dear Klenex,
As I indicated above, that structure is awkward --- it leaves us with the feeling that something is missing. I'm not sure that there's any sentence with that structure that would be correct on the GMAT SC.
Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2014, 11:44
mikemcgarry wrote:
Klenex wrote:
Thanks for the explanation. It's clear now.

Pls. give some examples where 'support to' is used..

Dear Klenex,
As I indicated above, that structure is awkward --- it leaves us with the feeling that something is missing. I'm not sure that there's any sentence with that structure that would be correct on the GMAT SC.
Does this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

Is "support in "correct idiom.
if it was in one of the answer choices ..
provides compelling support in classifying..

Thanks
Rahul
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan [#permalink] New post 12 Feb 2014, 16:05
Expert's post
rahultripathi2005 wrote:
Hi Mike,

Is "support in "correct idiom.
if it was in one of the answer choices ..
provides compelling support in classifying..

Thanks
Rahul

Dear Rahul,
First, I want to correct the grammar in your question. You wrote:
if it was in one of the answer choices ..
and the correct structure is
if it were in one of the answer choices ..
This is the subjunctive mood. Many native English speakers don't understand this and use it incorrectly, so it is often tested on the GMAT. Here's a blog post with more info about it:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-gramm ... ive-tense/

Now, to your question. Both "support for" and "[b]support in[/b]" are correct idioms, but they have slightly different connotations. Here, the former idiom is correct, and the latter idiom would have the wrong connotation --- it would change the meaning of the original sentence too much.
A provide support for doing X. --- This has the connotation that, wherever the hard work of "doing X" is happening, A is not right there. The support might be financial support, emotional support, philosophical support. Here, the evidence provides intellectually support. The evidence definitely provide support, but when people start actually "classifying Africa’s forest elephants and its savanna elephants as separate species," the evidence just sits there passively on the page as real people do the work of making that decision.
A provide support in doing X. --- This one has the connotation that A is somehow involve in the nitty-gritty of the work, that wherever the work of "doing X" is done, A is right there in the thick of it. In one way or another, it implies more active involvement than the first idiom. That's not really appropriate in this question about the elephants in Africa.

Here's a free idiom ebook you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: New genetic evidence together with recent studies of elephan   [#permalink] 12 Feb 2014, 16:05
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