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No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the

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No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2003, 08:24
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62% (02:51) correct 38% (02:18) wrong based on 19 sessions
12. No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as an adequate demonstration of the truth of a theorem. In 1976, however, this was not the case. Some mathematicians at that time refused to accept the results of a complex computer demonstration of a very simple mapping theorem. Although some mathematicians still hold a strong belief that a simple theorem ought to have a short, simple proof, in fact, some simple theorems have required enormous proofs.

If all of the statements in the passage are true, which one of the following must also be true?

(A) Today, some mathematicians who believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof would consider accepting the results of an enormous computation as a demonstration of the truth of a theorem.

(B) Some individuals who believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof are not mathematicians.

(C) Today, some individuals who refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as a demonstration of the truth of a theorem believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof.

(D) Some individuals who do not believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof would not be willing to accept the results of an enormous computation as proof of a complex theorem.

(E) Some nonmathematicians do not believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2003, 11:06
tough one....i would say A.....
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2003, 13:24
Brainless wrote:
A

Real tough one.


Guy/Brain

you are right

Can you explain please
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Re: CR - Mathematicians [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2003, 13:59
It's A. If you look at the first sentence, it says that "No mathematician today would flatly refuse...an enormous computation as a...demonstration of the truth of a theorem."

What this means is that even those who believe simple thms should have simple proofs will consider complex computations. If answer A was false (that there are some mathematicians who would not consider complex comps as thm proofs), the first sentence of the problem would not be true.

praetorian123 wrote:
12. No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as an adequate demonstration of the truth of a theorem. In 1976, however, this was not the case. Some mathematicians at that time refused to accept the results of a complex computer demonstration of a very simple mapping theorem. Although some mathematicians still hold a strong belief that a simple theorem ought to have a short, simple proof, in fact, some simple theorems have required enormous proofs.

If all of the statements in the passage are true, which one of the following must also be true?

(A) Today, some mathematicians who believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof would consider accepting the results of an enormous computation as a demonstration of the truth of a theorem.

(B) Some individuals who believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof are not mathematicians.

(C) Today, some individuals who refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as a demonstration of the truth of a theorem believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof.

(D) Some individuals who do not believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof would not be willing to accept the results of an enormous computation as proof of a complex theorem.

(E) Some nonmathematicians do not believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2003, 14:58
jlyngal is correct...the first sentence is the crucial detail...
No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as an adequate demonstration of the truth of a theorem.

this basically says that b/c "no mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept" there are AT LEAST SOME mathematicians that would CONSIDER accepting.....

look at it this way, if they are not FLATLY refusing the data...then they must be AT LEAST CONSIDERING IT....
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Re: No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2012, 06:05
Praetorian wrote:
12. No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as an adequate demonstration of the truth of a theorem. In 1976, however, this was not the case. Some mathematicians at that time refused to accept the results of a complex computer demonstration of a very simple mapping theorem. Although some mathematicians still hold a strong belief that a simple theorem ought to have a short, simple proof, in fact, some simple theorems have required enormous proofs.

If all of the statements in the passage are true, which one of the following must also be true?

(A) Today, some mathematicians who believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof would consider accepting the results of an enormous computation as a demonstration of the truth of a theorem.
(B) Some individuals who believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof are not mathematicians.
(C) Today, some individuals who refuse to accept the results of an enormous computation as a demonstration of the truth of a theorem believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof.
(D) Some individuals who do not believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof would not be willing to accept the results of an enormous computation as proof of a complex theorem.
(E) Some nonmathematicians do not believe that a simple theorem ought to have a simple proof.


A. as it mentions the same conclusion...
B. it talks of some individuals...not mathematicians
C. it again talks of some individuals...not mathematicians
D. it again talks of some individuals...not mathematicians
E. it is comparing mathematicians vs non-mathematicians..hence out of scope

so A is the answer
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Re: No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the   [#permalink] 30 Jul 2012, 06:05
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No mathematician today would flatly refuse to accept the

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