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No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although

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No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2009, 20:38
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No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although there are a number of hypotheses. According to one hypothesis, dreams are produced when the brain is erasing “parasitic connections” (meaningless, accidental associations between ideas), which accumulate during the day and which would otherwise clog up our memories. Interestingly, the only mammal that does not have rapid eye movement sleep, in which we humans typically have our most vivid dreams, is the spiny anteater, which has been seen as anomalous in that it has a very large brain relative to the animal’s size. This fact provides some confirmation for the parasitic-connection hypothesis, since the hypothesis predicts that for an animal that did not dream to have an effective memory that animal would need extra memory space for the parasitic connections.

The parasitic-connection hypothesis, if true, most strongly supports which one of the following?
(A) The animals with the smallest brains spend the most time sleeping.
(B) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas.
(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired.
(D) Insofar as a person’s description of a dream involves meaningful associations between ideas, it is an inaccurate description.
(E) All animals other than the spiny anteater dream.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2009, 22:18
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although there are a number of hypotheses. According to one hypothesis, dreams are produced when the brain is erasing “parasitic connections” (meaningless, accidental associations between ideas), which accumulate during the day and which would otherwise clog up our memories. Interestingly, the only mammal that does not have rapid eye movement sleep, in which we humans typically have our most vivid dreams, is the spiny anteater, which has been seen as anomalous in that it has a very large brain relative to the animal’s size. This fact provides some confirmation for the parasitic-connection hypothesis, since the hypothesis predicts that for an animal that did not dream to have an effective memory that animal would need extra memory space for the parasitic connections.

The parasitic-connection hypothesis, if true, most strongly supports which one of the following?
(A) The animals with the smallest brains spend the most time sleeping.
(B) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas.
(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired.
(D) Insofar as a person’s description of a dream involves meaningful associations between ideas, it is an inaccurate description.
(E) All animals other than the spiny anteater dream.


C
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2009, 22:55
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although there are a number of hypotheses. According to one hypothesis, dreams are produced when the brain is erasing “parasitic connections” (meaningless, accidental associations between ideas), which accumulate during the day and which would otherwise clog up our memories. Interestingly, the only mammal that does not have rapid eye movement sleep, in which we humans typically have our most vivid dreams, is the spiny anteater, which has been seen as anomalous in that it has a very large brain relative to the animal’s size. This fact provides some confirmation for the parasitic-connection hypothesis, since the hypothesis predicts that for an animal that did not dream to have an effective memory that animal would need extra memory space for the parasitic connections.

The parasitic-connection hypothesis, if true, most strongly supports which one of the following?
(A) The animals with the smallest brains spend the most time sleeping.
The question is not the amt of time spent in sleeping but rapid eye movement sleep
(B) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas.
too extreme
(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired.
Hold
(D) Insofar as a person’s description of a dream involves meaningful associations between ideas, it is an inaccurate description.
Not relevant. Out of scope
(E) All animals other than the spiny anteater dream. Too extreme
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2009, 23:08
No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although there are a number of hypotheses. According to one hypothesis, dreams are produced when the brain is erasing “parasitic connections” (meaningless, accidental associations between ideas), which accumulate during the day and which would otherwise clog up our memories. Interestingly, the only mammal that does not have rapid eye movement sleep, in which we humans typically have our most vivid dreams, is the spiny anteater, which has been seen as anomalous in that it has a very large brain relative to the animal’s size. This fact provides some confirmation for the parasitic-connection hypothesis, since the hypothesis predicts that for an animal that did not dream to have an effective memory that animal would need extra memory space for the parasitic connections.

The parasitic-connection hypothesis, if true, most strongly supports which one of the following?


Explanation:
--------------------------
(A) The animals with the smallest brains spend the most time sleeping. ---> Irrelevant. Nothing has been discussed about duration of sleeping time; only dreams have been discussed.

(B) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas. ---> Not necessarily true. It’s going to an extreme (…virtually no accidental…).

(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired. ---> Very true. The hypothesis states that extra memory space will be required by animals who do not dream in order to ensure that they have an effective memory. In this option, we will not assume that the mammal it’s talking about has an extra memory space. So, if we apply this hypothesis in general, then option C will be most strongly supported.

(D) Insofar as a person’s description of a dream involves meaningful associations between ideas, it is an inaccurate description. ---> Not necessarily true. It’s not written that a person can only dream of meaningless, accidental associations between ideas; he might dream something meaningful.

(E) All animals other than the spiny anteater dream. ---> Usage of extreme word (All animals…). Excerpt discusses only mammals.
--------------------------

I also go for option C.


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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2009, 23:14
I initially tht its B
seems C is a better choice
good Q indeed

ritula wrote:
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although there are a number of hypotheses. According to one hypothesis, dreams are produced when the brain is erasing “parasitic connections” (meaningless, accidental associations between ideas), which accumulate during the day and which would otherwise clog up our memories. Interestingly, the only mammal that does not have rapid eye movement sleep, in which we humans typically have our most vivid dreams, is the spiny anteater, which has been seen as anomalous in that it has a very large brain relative to the animal’s size. This fact provides some confirmation for the parasitic-connection hypothesis, since the hypothesis predicts that for an animal that did not dream to have an effective memory that animal would need extra memory space for the parasitic connections.

The parasitic-connection hypothesis, if true, most strongly supports which one of the following?
(A) The animals with the smallest brains spend the most time sleeping.
The question is not the amt of time spent in sleeping but rapid eye movement sleep
(B) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas.
too extreme
(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired.
Hold
(D) Insofar as a person’s description of a dream involves meaningful associations between ideas, it is an inaccurate description.
Not relevant. Out of scope
(E) All animals other than the spiny anteater dream. Too extreme

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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2009, 23:22
This is a tough question.
Between B & C. I would go with B.

According to the hypothesis, when a person dreams, accidental associations of ideas will be erased. Therefore he will virtually have no recollection of those events.

Option B didn't sound right, because the hypothesis surmises that additional memory space is necessary to have an effective memory. Assuming that a dreamless sleep will lead to the impairment of memory will be far-fetched.

We can easily eliminate the rest of the options:
A. The theory is not conjectured based on the size of the brain.
D. It is an anti-thesis of the hypothesis.
E. The hypothesis talks about mammals and not all animals.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2009, 03:00
Did u mean C?
aielman wrote:
This is a tough question.
Between B & C. I would go with B.
According to the hypothesis, when a person dreams, accidental associations of ideas will be erased. Therefore he will virtually have no recollection of those events.

Option B didn't sound right, because the hypothesis surmises that additional memory space is necessary to have an effective memory. Assuming that a dreamless sleep will lead to the impairment of memory will be far-fetched.

We can easily eliminate the rest of the options:
A. The theory is not conjectured based on the size of the brain.
D. It is an anti-thesis of the hypothesis.
E. The hypothesis talks about mammals and not all animals.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 27 Feb 2009, 11:05
OA is C. Thanks for the discussion. Somehow I find stem too much descriptive and bewildered to B..... :?
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 28 Feb 2009, 17:20
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
OA is C. Thanks for the discussion. Somehow I find stem too much descriptive and bewildered to B..... :?


I also chose C. However, while solving 15-20 such questions in a row, I also face similar challenge.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2010, 06:10
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at first glance we can ignore a , c and e all three are irrelavant and out of scope

to decide between B and c
b) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas.

b seems to too extreme

(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired.

in this part of statement it was stated that would otherwise clog up our memories

so of all the choices C seems to be the best so my ans choice is C
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2010, 07:50
C
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2010, 09:11
good question. I really got confused initially. The trick here is to understand that dreams and memory are being related. So I chose C.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2010, 09:43
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Agreed that B is too extreme. The passage is consistent with the statement in B, but B requires the reader to take an extra step beyond what the passage says -- that a person has *virtually no* accidental associations between ideas. The passage says that the theory states that the brain uses dreams to clean up "parasitic connections," but doesn't go so far as to say that it cleans virtually all of these associations by the time a person wakes up.

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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2010, 15:05
C sounds good to me.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 12 Jan 2010, 17:14
priyankur_saha@ml.com wrote:
No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although there are a number of hypotheses. According to one hypothesis, dreams are produced when the brain is erasing “parasitic connections” (meaningless, accidental associations between ideas), which accumulate during the day and which would otherwise clog up our memories. Interestingly, the only mammal that does not have rapid eye movement sleep, in which we humans typically have our most vivid dreams, is the spiny anteater, which has been seen as anomalous in that it has a very large brain relative to the animal’s size. This fact provides some confirmation for the parasitic-connection hypothesis, since the hypothesis predicts that for an animal that did not dream to have an effective memory that animal would need extra memory space for the parasitic connections.

The parasitic-connection hypothesis, if true, most strongly supports which one of the following?
(A) The animals with the smallest brains spend the most time sleeping.
(B) Immediately after a person awakens from normal sleep, her or his memory contains virtually no accidental associations between ideas.
(C) When a mammal that would normally dream is prevented from dreaming, the functioning of its memory will be impaired.
(D) Insofar as a person’s description of a dream involves meaningful associations between ideas, it is an inaccurate description.
(E) All animals other than the spiny anteater dream.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
C


Tough question. I say C.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2011, 10:55
D.

This stated directly in the passage. Dreams are used to remove parasitic Ideas that clog thebrain

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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2011, 11:31
thanks for the question and explanations. all clear.
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Re: CR - Parasitic Connections [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2011, 15:22
quixx23 wrote:
Agreed that B is too extreme. The passage is consistent with the statement in B, but B requires the reader to take an extra step beyond what the passage says -- that a person has *virtually no* accidental associations between ideas. The passage says that the theory states that the brain uses dreams to clean up "parasitic connections," but doesn't go so far as to say that it cleans virtually all of these associations by the time a person wakes up.

Scott


Hi Scott or anyone out there. Would this be an inference question? Can anyone give me more insight into this question stem setup?
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Re: No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2012, 07:20
Option C is right
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Re: No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2012, 08:41
+1 C. It seems as though length makes this one difficult. It is a pretty concise idea but a lot of details. C is the one that is most supported. D is just stated. If the question asked which one was true then maybe D
Re: No one knows what purposes, if any, dreams serve, although   [#permalink] 19 Jan 2012, 08:41
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