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No topic exists. Colonial historian David Allen's intensive

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No topic exists. Colonial historian David Allen's intensive [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2011, 13:42
No topic exists.

Colonial historian David Allen's intensive study of five communities in seventeenth-century Massachusetts is a model of meticulous scholarship on the detailed microcosmic level, and is convincing up to a point. Allen suggests that much more coherence and direct continuity existed between English and colonial agricultural practices and administrative organization than other historians have suggested. However, he overstates his case with the declaration that he has proved "the remarkable extent to which diversity in New England local institutions was directly imitative of regional differences in the mother country."

Such an assertion ignores critical differences between seventeenth-century England and New England. First, England was overcrowded and land-hungry; New England was sparsely populated and labor-hungry. Second, England suffered the normal European rate of mortality; New England, especially in the first generation of English colonists, was virtually free from infectious diseases. Third, England had an all-embracing state church; in New England membership in a church was restricted to the elect. Fourth, a high proportion of English villagers lived under paternalistic resident squires; no such class existed in New England. By narrowing his focus to village institutions and ignoring these critical differences, which studies by Greven, Demos, and Lockridge have shown to be so important, Allen has created a somewhat distorted picture of reality.

Allen's work is a rather extreme example of the "country community" school of seventeenth-century English history whose intemperate excesses in removing all national issues from the history of that period have been exposed by Professor Clive Holmes. What conclusion can be drawn, for example, from Allen's discovery that Puritan clergy who had come to the colonies from East Anglia were one-third to one-half as likely to return to England by 1660 as were Puritan ministers from western and northern England? We are not told in what way, if at all, this discovery illuminates historical understanding. Studies of local history have enormously expanded our horizons, but it is a mistake for their authors to conclude that village institutions are all that mattered, simply because their functions are all that the records of village institutions reveal.


Q:The passage suggests that Professor Clive Holmes would most likely agree with which of the following statements?

A) An understanding of seventeenth-century English local institutions requires a consideration of national issues.
B) The "country community" school of seventeenth-century English history distorts historical evidence in order to establish continuity between old and new institutions.
C) Most historians distort reality by focusing on national concerns to the exclusion of local concerns.
D) National issues are best understood from the perspective of those at the local level.
E) Local histories of seventeenth-century English villages have contributed little to the understanding of village life.


Q: It can be inferred from the passage that the author of the passage consider Allen's theory(see highlighted text) to be

A) already known to early historians
B) based on logical fallacy
C) improbable but nevertheless convincing
D) an unexplained, isolated fact
E) a new, insightful explanation.

Please do provide the reasoning also. :)

OA's
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A;D

Last edited by czarczar on 02 Sep 2011, 02:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: GMAT RC [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2011, 01:53
czarczar wrote:
No topic exists.

Colonial historian David Allen's intensive study of five communities in seventeenth-century Massachusetts is a model of meticulous scholarship on the detailed microcosmic level, and is convincing up to a point. Allen suggests that much more coherence and direct continuity existed between English and colonial agricultural practices and administrative organization than other historians have suggested. However, he overstates his case with the declaration that he has proved "the remarkable extent to which diversity in New England local institutions was directly imitative of regional differences in the mother country."

Such an assertion ignores critical differences between seventeenth-century England and New England. First, England was overcrowded and land-hungry; New England was sparsely populated and labor-hungry. Second, England suffered the normal European rate of mortality; New England, especially in the first generation of English colonists, was virtually free from infectious diseases. Third, England had an all-embracing state church; in New England membership in a church was restricted to the elect. Fourth, a high proportion of English villagers lived under paternalistic resident squires; no such class existed in New England. By narrowing his focus to village institutions and ignoring these critical differences, which studies by Greven, Demos, and Lockridge have shown to be so important, Allen has created a somewhat distorted picture of reality.

Allen's work is a rather extreme example of the "country community" school of seventeenth-century English history whose intemperate excesses in removing all national issues from the history of that period have been exposed by Professor Clive Holmes. What conclusion can be drawn, for example, from Allen's discovery that Puritan clergy who had come to the colonies from East Anglia were one-third to one-half as likely to return to England by 1660 as were Puritan ministers from western and northern England? We are not told in what way, if at all, this discovery illuminates historical understanding. Studies of local history have enormously expanded our horizons, but it is a mistake for their authors to conclude that village institutions are all that mattered, simply because their functions are all that the records of village institutions reveal.


Q:The passage suggests that Professor Clive Holmes would most likely agree with which of the following statements?

A) An understanding of seventeenth-century English local institutions requires a consideration of national issues.
B) The "country community" school of seventeenth-century English history distorts historical evidence in order to establish continuity between old and new institutions.
C) Most historians distort reality by focusing on national concerns to the exclusion of local concerns.
D) National issues are best understood from the perspective of those at the local level.
E) Local histories of seventeenth-century English villages have contributed little to the understanding of village life.


Q: It can be inferred from the passage that the author of the passage consider Allen's theory(see highlighted text) to be

A) already known to early historians
B) based on logical fallacy This can be inferred from last sentence of last para "it is a mistake for their authors to conclude that ...."
C) improbable but nevertheless convincing
D) an unexplained, isolated fact
E) a new, insightful explanation.

Please do provide the reasoning also. :)

OA's after discussion.
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Re: GMAT RC [#permalink] New post 02 Sep 2011, 02:57
Any more takes?

Anways, I have edited the post with the OA.
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Re: GMAT RC [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2011, 21:58
Experts, Pls help to provide explanations
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Re: GMAT RC [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2011, 23:01
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Q1 : Since Professor Clive Holmes exposed that Allens work is a distorted picture or rahter and entreme example of Country community with his idea that National issues should be considered to study the history could be the correct answer.. SO A is correct
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Re: GMAT RC [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2011, 23:09
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Q2 > clearly it can be understood that the picture given Allen is not correct because he missed the logic that National issues should be considered to asserted his study.

so B is the answer
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Re: No topic exists. Colonial historian David Allen's intensive [#permalink] New post 13 May 2013, 11:08
Can someone explain what below statements conveys,i dint understood and hence mistaken answer,sometimes author wording for a passage is so dense,i just keep re-reading same line 4-5 times and still dint get right answer

"Allen's work is a rather extreme example of the "country community" school of seventeenth-century English history whose intemperate excesses in removing all national issues from the history of that period have been exposed by Professor Clive Holmes"
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Re: GMAT RC [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2014, 14:40
gjayachandra wrote:
Q2 > clearly it can be understood that the picture given Allen is not correct because he missed the logic that National issues should be considered to asserted his study.

so B is the answer


Hi I'm new to Gmatclub so I'm not sure if the explanation to this question is already addressed elsewhere...but for question 2 I had also thought the answer was B but it is incorrect. Why is the answer D? Can anyone please explain?
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Re: No topic exists. Colonial historian David Allen's intensive [#permalink] New post 08 Sep 2014, 10:28
2 More questions. Anyone knows the answers?

17. According to the passage, which of the following was true of most villages in seventeenth-century England?
(A) The resident squire had significant authority.
(B) Church members were selected on the basis of their social status within the community.
(C) Low population density restricted agricultural and economic growth.
(D) There was little diversity in local institutions from one region to another.
(E) National events had little impact on local customs and administrative organization.

20. The author of the passage is primarily concerned with
(A) substantiating a claim about a historical event
(B) reconciling two opposing ideas about a historical era
(C) disputing evidence a scholar uses to substantiate a claim about a historical event
(D) analyzing two approaches to scholarly research and evaluating their methodologies
(E) criticizing a particular study and the approach to historical scholarship it represents
Re: No topic exists. Colonial historian David Allen's intensive   [#permalink] 08 Sep 2014, 10:28
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