Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 27 Jul 2014, 22:34

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Northwestern (Kellogg)

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 14 Sep 2007
Posts: 908
Schools: Kellogg '10
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 87 [0], given: 15

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2008, 10:51
Does anyone know if it is more difficult to get acceptance to Kellogg's 1-year program as compared to the 2-year program? I have an undergraduate business degree, so the pre-requisites are all in place.
_________________

http://www.fantasticcontraption.com

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 4320
Location: Back in Chicago, IL
Schools: Kellogg Alum: Class of 2010
Followers: 77

Kudos [?]: 691 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2008, 11:14
Yes it is more difficult. Its a smaller program and I think its the only one at a top school, there are a few other accelerated programs but I cant think of any as short as Kelloggs at an UE or E school. How much more difficult is hard to say, but it also has a very high yield since its a unique program. Even if the admit rate is not a whole lot lower remember most applicants will have similar backgrounds so it will be harder to set yourself apart. My interviewer was a 1Y and he joked he wished he did the 2Y program because he had such a great time at school and would have loved to spend another year.
_________________

Kellogg Class of 2010...still active and willing to help. However, I do not do profile reviews, don't offer predictions on chances and am far to busy to review essays, so save the energy of writing me a PM seeking help for these. If I don't respond to a PM that is not one of the previously mentioned trash can destined messages, please don't take it personally I get so many messages I have a hard to responding to most. The more interesting, compelling, or humorous you message the more likely I am to respond.
Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 14 Sep 2007
Posts: 908
Schools: Kellogg '10
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 87 [0], given: 15

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 26 Feb 2008, 12:35
riverripper wrote:
Yes it is more difficult. Its a smaller program and I think its the only one at a top school, there are a few other accelerated programs but I cant think of any as short as Kelloggs at an UE or E school. How much more difficult is hard to say, but it also has a very high yield since its a unique program. Even if the admit rate is not a whole lot lower remember most applicants will have similar backgrounds so it will be harder to set yourself apart. My interviewer was a 1Y and he joked he wished he did the 2Y program because he had such a great time at school and would have loved to spend another year.


I can't say I'm surprised by the lower acceptance rate, or the interviewer's desire for a 2Y. I have the same desire myself, but I'd prefer to limit the amount of time away from my current location (girlfriend can't move). Plus, it would be nice to save the money. To a degree, I think that I can set myself apart from most undergrad b-schoolers given my experience at a start-up biotech. I don't think that's too common. Thanks for the input.
_________________

http://www.fantasticcontraption.com

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

17 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 9
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 36 [17] , given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 09 May 2008, 15:11
17
This post received
KUDOS
As a current student at Kellogg, I'd like to offer some inside (and, inevitably, biased) insights on our supposed weakness in finance, relative to schools like Wharton, Columbia and Chicago GSB.

We're obviously proud of our top reputation in marketing, but we're also a bit tired of the notion that if you want to do finance, you're better off going somewhere else. In fact, many here argue that our strength in finance is a well-kept secret in the MBA world.

On the academic side, Kellogg professors won one of the highest number of prizes (compared to other schools) for their articles in the Journal of Finance, one of the most prestigious finance publications. Robert McDonald's book on Derivatives Markets is considered the industry standard and is used in top business schools around the world. Other faculty includes people who have run PE / VC funds, or have held senior positions at bulge bracket firms. No weakness there.

On the recruiting side, Wall Street is incredibly receptive of Kellogg students, partly because we have a reputation for working well in teams, which, let's face it, is not what the average banker is known for. The feedback we get from Wall Street recruiters is that they'd love more Kellogg students, but since so few are interested in that career field, recruiting them is difficult. The students that do pursue a banking career (not me by the way), and in fact many of my first-year friends, are going to all the right places on Wall Street and in London.

The finance caliber of our students is nothing to be ashamed of -- we do remarkably well in b-school finance competitions. Kellogg placed first in the 2008 Wharton MBA Buyout Case Competition, ahead of Wharton, HBS and Chicago GSB. Months ago we placed second in the Cornell MBA Stock Pitch Competition, ahead of Wharton, Columbia, and Chicago GSB. Last year we placed first in that same competition. In 2007 we won the Evergreen Investments Alpha Challenge, beating LBS, Chicago GSB, Columbia and others. Kellogg and Chicago GSB compete every year in the JPMorgan M&A Challenge, and Kellogg has won six of the past nine years. I cannot find weakness there.

Don't get me wrong -- I'm sure other schools can also drum up lists of impressive accomplishments and credentials, and I'm not trying to prove that we're better in any way. I just think it's hard to justify the claim that our finance program is 'weaker'. I would argue that we're right there at the top, it's just that that's not what we're known for.

Which leads me to the actual recruiting process. Anyone who has gone through recruiting at a top business school knows the mixed blessing of recruiting events. Yes, you get the opportunity to network to try and secure an interview, but so do your classmates. Students always ask recruiters how to maximize their chances of getting an interview, and the answer, invariably, is "be memorable". And that's where Kellogg starts to be a pleasant place. It's easier to be "memorable" among 50 students (which is roughly how many people recruit for banking at Kellogg), than it is among 150-200 students, which is closer to the number at the traditional finance schools. One of our finance professors, David Stowell, puts it like this: would you rather be a small fish in a big pond, or a big fish in a small pond?

This phenomenon is arguably even more profound in the actual interviewing process. Since banks can usually hire less people than they consider 'hireable', you have to outperform your peers if you want to land that job at Goldman Sachs or Morgan Stanley. At Kellogg you're competing against mostly career switchers with limited finance experience (banks love career switchers by the way), whereas at the more traditional finance schools you'll find more people with prior banking experience or who live and breathe to become a banker. Who would you rather compete with?

Then you have the effect of competition between schools for spots at the big banks. Sure, the traditional finance schools will fill plenty of spots every year, but banks want diversity in their teams and if they can hire one more person, it can be beneficial to be the potential second Kellogg hire as opposed to being the potential tenth hire from Columbia, Wharton, etc.

Again, I'm not arguing that these schools don't deserve their stellar finance reputations, and if you want to work on Wall Street there's no doubt that those schools are very safe choices. But, I do think that Kellogg sometimes gets dismissed way too easily as 'not a finance school'.

Note that, by the same logic, you could argue that if it's good to be the 'underdog banker' at Kellogg, it would be equally beneficial to be the 'underdog marketer' at for example Wharton -- and I would say that's true. I'm sure that Wharton is an excellent place to do marketing, and that your chances of landing a good marketing job are just as good at Wharton as they are at Kellogg. I would argue that there is very little difference between the top schools in this regard. Don't dismiss Wharton if you want to do marketing, and don't dismiss Kellogg if you want to do finance.

Anyway, I just wanted to add my two cents. As you can probably tell I'm very excited about Kellogg, and think it's an excellent school, whatever your career goals are.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 May 2008
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 10 May 2008, 06:23
Hey Larzke !!

So you finally ended up with kellogs. I often read your debrief on TM, it's so inspiring, and your debrief is in 5 star rated catagoery :-D
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Apr 2008
Posts: 497
Schools: Kellogg, MIT, Michigan, Berkeley, Marshall, Mellon
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 13

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 13 May 2008, 07:37
great post larzke!!

I gave you one kudo!

Regards
_________________

mates, please visit my profile and leave comments
johnlewis1980-s-profile-feedback-is-more-than-welcome-80538.html

I'm not linked to GMAT questions anymore, so, if you need something, please PM me

I'm already focused on my application package :)

My experience in my second attempt
http://gmatclub.com/forum/p544312#p544312
My experience in my third attempt
630-q-47-v-28-engineer-non-native-speaker-my-experience-78215.html#p588275

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Aug 2008
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 02 Aug 2008, 00:49
I had few questions on the 1yr program:
As a part of the corporate training, I took courses offered by a local school to meet all the pre-requisites at Kellogg. I am an Engineer with Bachelors and Masters degrees in Engineering from top schools, 4 years of work-ex by the time I start for Summer 2009, and a GMAT of 720/800. I was wondering if Kellogg accepts applicants who do not have graduate business degrees but have all the pre-requisites in place. Also, for a program that would largely attract people with undergraduate degrees in business, will being an Engineer be a significant diversity to stand out in the applicant pool? Basically trying to assess my chances at the only school I am targetting.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jan 2008
Posts: 218
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2008, 11:33
Does anyone know where I can find some third party perspective on the Management and Organizations, and Management and Strategy majors at Kellogg? At this point, my thoughts are that I would major in Finance, Org Mgmt, and Strategic Mgmt.

I feel a bit odd not looking into marketing in depth given the strength of the school, but my attraction to Kellogg started from the team work philosophy and strength as a school that develops flexible and well rounded leaders. General management/functional expertise within a corporation is the long range goal. I would also consider making the Org Mgmt major into one of their minors, and allocating the other time to Marketing.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Apr 2008
Posts: 497
Schools: Kellogg, MIT, Michigan, Berkeley, Marshall, Mellon
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 13

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2008, 22:48
Manbehindthecurtain wrote:
Does anyone know where I can find some third party perspective on the Management and Organizations, and Management and Strategy majors at Kellogg? At this point, my thoughts are that I would major in Finance, Org Mgmt, and Strategic Mgmt.

I feel a bit odd not looking into marketing in depth given the strength of the school, but my attraction to Kellogg started from the team work philosophy and strength as a school that develops flexible and well rounded leaders. General management/functional expertise within a corporation is the long range goal. I would also consider making the Org Mgmt major into one of their minors, and allocating the other time to Marketing.


Have you tried to contact a current student?

I have the same thoughts as yours regarding Kellogg, and I asked for further information. The conclussion is that Kellogg is also very strong in MC and strategy.

Thanks to those contacts I did, I chose Kellogg to apply for.

Cheers
_________________

mates, please visit my profile and leave comments
johnlewis1980-s-profile-feedback-is-more-than-welcome-80538.html

I'm not linked to GMAT questions anymore, so, if you need something, please PM me

I'm already focused on my application package :)

My experience in my second attempt
http://gmatclub.com/forum/p544312#p544312
My experience in my third attempt
630-q-47-v-28-engineer-non-native-speaker-my-experience-78215.html#p588275

1 KUDOS received
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 4320
Location: Back in Chicago, IL
Schools: Kellogg Alum: Class of 2010
Followers: 77

Kudos [?]: 691 [1] , given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2008, 07:42
1
This post received
KUDOS
From what I have been told it is very easy to complete both management majors. The majors only have 3 or 4 course requirements and some overlap for different majors. I wouldnt worry so much about majors but about taking the classes you want. No matter what you will complete a major or two, a lot of people do 3 or 4. A major in an MBA is not as important as it is in undergrad. You are much better off taking classes you really want and that will be a benefit to your future career. However, you definitely should choose one major that directly relates to your career and make sure you complete it. Marketing, Finance, Strategy, etc...depending on what you want to do.
_________________

Kellogg Class of 2010...still active and willing to help. However, I do not do profile reviews, don't offer predictions on chances and am far to busy to review essays, so save the energy of writing me a PM seeking help for these. If I don't respond to a PM that is not one of the previously mentioned trash can destined messages, please don't take it personally I get so many messages I have a hard to responding to most. The more interesting, compelling, or humorous you message the more likely I am to respond.
Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jan 2008
Posts: 218
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2008, 09:24
riverripper wrote:
From what I have been told it is very easy to complete both management majors. The majors only have 3 or 4 course requirements and some overlap for different majors. I wouldnt worry so much about majors but about taking the classes you want. No matter what you will complete a major or two, a lot of people do 3 or 4. A major in an MBA is not as important as it is in undergrad. You are much better off taking classes you really want and that will be a benefit to your future career. However, you definitely should choose one major that directly relates to your career and make sure you complete it. Marketing, Finance, Strategy, etc...depending on what you want to do.


Thanks for the response. Going further on this, I'd like to get a better sense of the market quality of Kellogg's Org Mgmt and Strat. Mgmt departments. I know Marketing is considered their core strength, but I haven't found much independent conversation about these other programs.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 4320
Location: Back in Chicago, IL
Schools: Kellogg Alum: Class of 2010
Followers: 77

Kudos [?]: 691 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2008, 10:46
Manbehindthecurtain wrote:
Thanks for the response. Going further on this, I'd like to get a better sense of the market quality of Kellogg's Org Mgmt and Strat. Mgmt departments. I know Marketing is considered their core strength, but I haven't found much independent conversation about these other programs.


Kellogg is generally considered one of the top generam management MBA programs out there. MC placement only trails H/S/W and thats pretty impressive. More folks actually go into management and MC than marketing...However, marketing they are the #1 school and for management they fall behind to HBS. I think you need to get beyond the strength of majors since its really the strength of a program in a given field that matters and for that Kellogg is considered one of the best management schools around.

Dont concern yourself with the specifics of majors and look more at what courses are offered and whether a school has electives specific to your desired industry. Here larger schools have the advantage because they can run courses for less popular areas of study and still get enough people to take it to justify. A school like Tuck has a great reputation but it is small and is going to offer far fewer options than Kellogg, GSB, Wharton, and other larger schools.
_________________

Kellogg Class of 2010...still active and willing to help. However, I do not do profile reviews, don't offer predictions on chances and am far to busy to review essays, so save the energy of writing me a PM seeking help for these. If I don't respond to a PM that is not one of the previously mentioned trash can destined messages, please don't take it personally I get so many messages I have a hard to responding to most. The more interesting, compelling, or humorous you message the more likely I am to respond.
Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 24 Sep 2008
Posts: 194
Schools: MIT / INSEAD / IIM - ABC
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 16 [1] , given: 7

Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2008, 03:13
1
This post received
KUDOS
larzke wrote:
As a current student at Kellogg, I'd like to offer some inside (and, inevitably, biased) insights on our supposed weakness in finance, relative to schools like Wharton, Columbia and Chicago GSB.

We're obviously proud of our top reputation in marketing, but we're also a bit tired of the notion that if you want to do finance, you're better off going somewhere else. In fact, many here argue that our strength in finance is a well-kept secret in the MBA world.

On the academic side, Kellogg professors won one of the highest number of prizes (compared to other schools) for their articles in the Journal of Finance, one of the most prestigious finance publications. Robert McDonald's book on Derivatives Markets is considered the industry standard and is used in top business schools around the world. Other faculty includes people who have run PE / VC funds, or have held senior positions at bulge bracket firms. No weakness there.

On the recruiting side, Wall Street is incredibly receptive of Kellogg students, partly because we have a reputation for working well in teams, which, let's face it, is not what the average banker is known for. The feedback we get from Wall Street recruiters is that they'd love more Kellogg students, but since so few are interested in that career field, recruiting them is difficult. The students that do pursue a banking career (not me by the way), and in fact many of my first-year friends, are going to all the right places on Wall Street and in London.

The finance caliber of our students is nothing to be ashamed of -- we do remarkably well in b-school finance competitions. Kellogg placed first in the 2008 Wharton MBA Buyout Case Competition, ahead of Wharton, HBS and Chicago GSB. Months ago we placed second in the Cornell MBA Stock Pitch Competition, ahead of Wharton, Columbia, and Chicago GSB. Last year we placed first in that same competition. In 2007 we won the Evergreen Investments Alpha Challenge, beating LBS, Chicago GSB, Columbia and others. Kellogg and Chicago GSB compete every year in the JPMorgan M&A Challenge, and Kellogg has won six of the past nine years. I cannot find weakness there.

Don't get me wrong -- I'm sure other schools can also drum up lists of impressive accomplishments and credentials, and I'm not trying to prove that we're better in any way. I just think it's hard to justify the claim that our finance program is 'weaker'. I would argue that we're right there at the top, it's just that that's not what we're known for.

Which leads me to the actual recruiting process. Anyone who has gone through recruiting at a top business school knows the mixed blessing of recruiting events. Yes, you get the opportunity to network to try and secure an interview, but so do your classmates. Students always ask recruiters how to maximize their chances of getting an interview, and the answer, invariably, is "be memorable". And that's where Kellogg starts to be a pleasant place. It's easier to be "memorable" among 50 students (which is roughly how many people recruit for banking at Kellogg), than it is among 150-200 students, which is closer to the number at the traditional finance schools. One of our finance professors, David Stowell, puts it like this: would you rather be a small fish in a big pond, or a big fish in a small pond?

This phenomenon is arguably even more profound in the actual interviewing process. Since banks can usually hire less people than they consider 'hireable', you have to outperform your peers if you want to land that job at Goldman Sachs or Morgan Stanley. At Kellogg you're competing against mostly career switchers with limited finance experience (banks love career switchers by the way), whereas at the more traditional finance schools you'll find more people with prior banking experience or who live and breathe to become a banker. Who would you rather compete with?

Then you have the effect of competition between schools for spots at the big banks. Sure, the traditional finance schools will fill plenty of spots every year, but banks want diversity in their teams and if they can hire one more person, it can be beneficial to be the potential second Kellogg hire as opposed to being the potential tenth hire from Columbia, Wharton, etc.

Again, I'm not arguing that these schools don't deserve their stellar finance reputations, and if you want to work on Wall Street there's no doubt that those schools are very safe choices. But, I do think that Kellogg sometimes gets dismissed way too easily as 'not a finance school'.

Note that, by the same logic, you could argue that if it's good to be the 'underdog banker' at Kellogg, it would be equally beneficial to be the 'underdog marketer' at for example Wharton -- and I would say that's true. I'm sure that Wharton is an excellent place to do marketing, and that your chances of landing a good marketing job are just as good at Wharton as they are at Kellogg. I would argue that there is very little difference between the top schools in this regard. Don't dismiss Wharton if you want to do marketing, and don't dismiss Kellogg if you want to do finance.

Anyway, I just wanted to add my two cents. As you can probably tell I'm very excited about Kellogg, and think it's an excellent school, whatever your career goals are.



really good thread.....i absolutely support your point that don't dismiss Wharton if you want to do marketing, and don't dismiss Kellogg if you want to do finance.

I am planning to apply to Kellogg but i didn't know that it's been preferred by career switchers; i am looking for a career switch post my 1yr MBA. Currently, i am into branding and marketing and would like to move into I banking.

Thanks a lot for info!
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 4320
Location: Back in Chicago, IL
Schools: Kellogg Alum: Class of 2010
Followers: 77

Kudos [?]: 691 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2008, 19:28
GODSPEED wrote:
I am planning to apply to Kellogg but i didn't know that it's been preferred by career switchers; i am looking for a career switch post my 1yr MBA. Currently, i am into branding and marketing and would like to move into I banking.

Thanks a lot for info!


If you are going to switch careers you definitely should look at the 2Y program not the 1Y. The internship will be a huge help, the 1Y seems to be dominated by people who just want to advance in their path either to move up in position or into a bigger name company.
_________________

Kellogg Class of 2010...still active and willing to help. However, I do not do profile reviews, don't offer predictions on chances and am far to busy to review essays, so save the energy of writing me a PM seeking help for these. If I don't respond to a PM that is not one of the previously mentioned trash can destined messages, please don't take it personally I get so many messages I have a hard to responding to most. The more interesting, compelling, or humorous you message the more likely I am to respond.
Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Jul 2010
Posts: 18
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2010, 13:55
Why do banks like career switchers? Is that still the case?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jul 2010
Posts: 11
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 0

Re: Northwestern (Kellogg) [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2010, 13:20
What's the synopsis on getting into the JDMBA program? GPA/GMAT/WE? What do they look for?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Jan 2011
Posts: 13
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: My Chances [#permalink] New post 24 Jan 2011, 21:24
KLmets wrote:
This is my dream school.

I've just gotten 740 on my GMAT and I'm planning on applying for Fall 2007 deadline.

I have 4 years of work experience in a technology oriented publication. I currently reside as the assistant managing editor. I've had great success in this field, and I would like an MBA to help me do even better in the technology publication industry.

I went to a top 50 US techonology oriented institute, graduating with a 3.6 GPA. My major was Electronic Arts, with a minor in CompSci and another minor in Game Studies.

My long-term goal: To start up a technology publication of my own.

But first, I'd like to go to Kellogg's because I want to concentrate on marketing. Too often do I see mistakes made by those in touch with the tech-world and not so much with reality. I think an MBA will help me bridge the gap between the "nerdy" and the corporate savvy.

Does anyone have any tips/suggestions for me?

Thanks in advance


All I know is my nums are on par with yours and I was not admitted!!!! Trying to crack this nut but clearly the process is not all about numbers.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 11 May 2011
Posts: 379
Location: US
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 60 [0], given: 46

Re: My Chances [#permalink] New post 15 Sep 2012, 23:22
Hi Folks,
I am planning to apply for Kellogg One Year MBA program. However, I am totally stumped by their eligibility criteria.

There are seven courses students must complete to be eligible for the One-Year Program: accounting, finance, marketing, statistics, operations, economics, and organizational behavior. I am an engineering graduate and do not have these courses covered as part of graduation. So how do I get these course completed before enrollment as it is a must requirement?

Please let me know, the 2nd round deadlines are in Mid Dec and i want to take the decision real fast. Kellogg University is one of my dream universities and I am wondering if it's going to stay in my dreams only, thanks to this criteria.

All suggestions are welcome. Please provide your input.

Cheers!
_________________

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What you do TODAY is important because you're exchanging a day of your life for it!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Re: My Chances   [#permalink] 15 Sep 2012, 23:22
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic Kellogg (Northwestern) Videos souvik101990 0 23 Feb 2013, 09:06
326 Experts publish their posts in the topic Kellogg (Northwestern) 2013 - Calling All Applicants finmaster 1501 04 Jul 2012, 16:31
Kellogg (Northwestern) vs. ESADE in Barcelona pinecrest 2 22 Mar 2011, 19:00
5 Northwestern (Kellogg) Av 7 19 Dec 2010, 17:38
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Northwestern (Kellogg)

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 38 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.