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Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European

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Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2004, 12:55
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture more apparent than their government buildings.
(A) more apparent than their
(B) so apparent as their
(C) more apparent than in its
(D) so apparent than in their
(E) as apparent as it is in its
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2004, 13:19
E for me
A) "influence" is compared to "government buildings"
B) "their" improperly refers to "Prakta" which is singular
C) "Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture more apparent than in its government buildings" Something is ambiguous here. "its" is refering to 'architecture" or "Prakta"? It should refer to Prakta since the sentence really meant Prakta's government buildings.
D) again, "their" has an improper plural referrent nowhere to be found
E) "Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture as apparent as it is in its government buildings" The bolded expression properly refers to the "influence" which was apparent. "its" properly refers to "Prakta", singular form

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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2004, 15:56
:beat
Yes C must be it and it was my first choice :madd
"nowhere" needs "more" to imply that "influence" is most apparent "in the government buildings"

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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2004, 16:24
E--as ... as, original--more than

in E, its and it share the referent. Ambiguous.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2004, 20:59
hallelujah1234 wrote:
E--as ... as, original--more than

in E, its and it share the referent. Ambiguous.


Can anyone explain further why E is wrong. "it" is present in C also.

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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2004, 02:02
E is wrong
"it" refers to "modern European architecture"
"its" also refers to the same referent: modern European architecture
Re-written, we have:
Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture as apparent as it[modern European architecture] is in its[modern European architecture's] government buildings.

C on the other hand properly refers to Prakta because "modern European architecture" cannot obviously be present in itself.

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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2004, 02:09
(E) is wrong because of one more reason, ---> "as apparent as" imply of the same intensity, while "more apparent than" implies of intensity more than the other. In other words (E) changes the meaning of sentence.

Any comments.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2004, 03:07
mba wrote:
(E) is wrong because of one more reason, ---> "as apparent as" imply of the same intensity, while "more apparent than" implies of intensity more than the other. In other words (E) changes the meaning of sentence.

Any comments.

Yes, it could change the meaning of the sentence but I still believe the main problem is with the use of "it" in E which makes for an improper referal. How can we know which is the meaning that the author wanted to convey when both are just as good?
Ex1: Nobody is as nice as he is
Ex2: Nobody is nicer than he is
The above two examples are both grammatically and logically correct. Hence, we cannot say that Ex1 changes the author's meaning since Ex2 can also changes the author's meaning.

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Re: SC [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2004, 05:50
It is C for me.

The sentence can be rewritten as follows.
The influence of modern European architecture is more apparent nowhere in Prakta than in its government buildings. So, I chose C.

A - Not parallel as 'in' missing
B - 'their' is hanging out there without proper reference
D - Same problem as that of B
E - Here, there is a confusion. 'it' refers to the influence and 'its' refers to city's. Definitely ambiguous 8-)

So, C stands tall 8-) till atleast, OA appars 8-)

gmatblast wrote:
Please explain your answer.


Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture more apparent than their government buildings.
(A) more apparent than their
(B) so apparent as their
(C) more apparent than in its
(D) so apparent than in their
(E) as apparent as it is in its

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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2004, 09:30
Paul wrote:
E is wrong
"it" refers to "modern European architecture"
"its" also refers to the same referent: modern European architecture
Re-written, we have:
Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture as apparent as it[modern European architecture] is in its[modern European architecture's] government buildings.

C on the other hand properly refers to Prakta because "modern European architecture" cannot obviously be present in itself.


Paul,
I need some clarification here !

I think E is wrong because of a similar reason as yours. But I think your sentence should have been thus :

Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture as apparent as it[the influence ] is in its[ the infulence's ] government buildings.

Any comments ?

I also agree that E changes the meaning becuase "as....as" makes the influence equal to other influences.
The original sentence had an effect of "more" and we should not lose that meaning.

OA is indeed C.

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Re: Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2012, 09:00
A – Not parallel. “than in” is missing. Incorrectly Comparing building with influence. Eliminate
B – wrong comparison. Building Vs influence. “as apparent as” is correct. Eliminate
C – Correct comparison – influence in Buildings in prakta Vs influence in Nowhere in prakta. Also Parallel. Keep
D – “so apparent than” – wrong usage. “as apparent as” is correct. Eliminate
E – First “It” – “influence of modern architechture”. Second its – Prakta. It can only refer one antecedent to avoid ambiguity. Eliminate.
Re: Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European   [#permalink] 30 Dec 2012, 09:00
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