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Once at a conference on the philosophy of language, a

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Once at a conference on the philosophy of language, a [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 20:46
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

Question Stats:

100% (02:15) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
Once at a conference on the philosophy of
language, a professor delivered a lengthy
and tiresome address the central thesis of
which was that “yes” and related slang
words such as “yeah” can be used only to
show agreement with a proposition. At
the end of the paper, a listener in the back
of the auditorium stood up and shouted in
a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted
a complete refutation of the paper.
The listener argued against the paper by
(A) offering a counter-example
(B) pointing out an inconsistency
(C) presenting an analogy
(D) attacking the speaker’s character
(E) citing additional evidence

Pls explain
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 20:53
B?

weird question
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2009, 22:27
rampuria wrote:
Once at a conference on the philosophy of
language, a professor delivered a lengthy
and tiresome address the central thesis of
which was that “yes” and related slang
words such as “yeah” can be used only to
show agreement with a proposition. At
the end of the paper, a listener in the back
of the auditorium stood up and shouted in
a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted
a complete refutation of the paper.
The listener argued against the paper by
(A) offering a counter-example - oh yeah in a sarcastic way is not a counter example.
(B) pointing out an inconsistency - there is no inconcistenct given in the passage
(C) presenting an analogy - analogy can't refute the paper.
(D) attacking the speaker’s character
(E) citing additional evidence - no additional evidence given by listener.

Pls explain


D

The listener argued against by attacking the speaker's character.
lengthy and tiresome address the central thesis - clearly says the professors character.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2009, 00:54
in for A
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2009, 01:34
A
rampuria wrote:
Once at a conference on the philosophy of
language, a professor delivered a lengthy
and tiresome address the central thesis of
which was that “yes” and related slang
words such as “yeah” can be used only to
show agreement with a proposition
. At
the end of the paper, a listener in the back
of the auditorium stood up and shouted in
a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted
a complete refutation of the paper.
The listener argued against the paper by
(A) offering a counter-example
(B) pointing out an inconsistency
(C) presenting an analogy
(D) attacking the speaker’s character
(E) citing additional evidence

Pls explain
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2009, 01:36
ritula wrote:
A
rampuria wrote:
Once at a conference on the philosophy of
language, a professor delivered a lengthy
and tiresome address the central thesis of
which was that “yes” and related slang
words such as “yeah” can be used only to
show agreement with a proposition
. At
the end of the paper, a listener in the back
of the auditorium stood up and shouted in
a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted
a complete refutation of the paper.
The listener argued against the paper by
(A) offering a counter-example
(B) pointing out an inconsistency
(C) presenting an analogy
(D) attacking the speaker’s character
(E) citing additional evidence

Pls explain



RITULA, WHY NOT B?
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2009, 05:53
In for B

I don't see any 'counter example' but I see an inconsistency. In the beginning the argument states that 'yeah' can be used only to show agreement with.... At the end the listener says the same word 'yeah' to mean something else

Am I missing something?......(Don't tell me Oh yeah!)

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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2009, 06:03
Well, i chose A for the following reasons:
The professor conveyed that yeah and yes can be used only to agreement. But since the listenerd sarcastically 'oh yeah', he wanted to say that i dnt agree with u still im saying 'yeah'. so he gave a counter example where these two words are used interchangeably even in disagreement. I think the usage of 'sarcastic' conveys this.
This was my interpretation. Rest let us c wht does the OA say.
rampuria wrote:
ritula wrote:
A
rampuria wrote:
Once at a conference on the philosophy of
language, a professor delivered a lengthy
and tiresome address the central thesis of
which was that “yes” and related slang
words such as “yeah” can be used only to
show agreement with a proposition
. At
the end of the paper, a listener in the back
of the auditorium stood up and shouted in
a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted
a complete refutation of the paper.
The listener argued against the paper by
(A) offering a counter-example
(B) pointing out an inconsistency
(C) presenting an analogy
(D) attacking the speaker’s character
(E) citing additional evidence

Pls explain



RITULA, WHY NOT B?
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 15 Feb 2009, 12:10
ritula wrote:
Well, i chose A for the following reasons:
The professor conveyed that yeah and yes can be used only to agreement. But since the listenerd sarcastically 'oh yeah', he wanted to say that i dnt agree with u still im saying 'yeah'. so he gave a counter example where these two words are used interchangeably even in disagreement. I think the usage of 'sarcastic' conveys this.
This was my interpretation. Rest let us c wht does the OA say.


After getting rid off C,D,E, it is about letting one of A/B go.

“yes” and related slang words such as “yeah” can be used only to show agreement with a proposition

a listener in the back of the auditorium stood up and shouted in a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted a complete refutation of the paper

Refuation means disagreement not just pointing out a flaw.

Also he uses yeah with oh! which is an exclamation and not a preposition.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2009, 08:47
Can we have the OA pls?

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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2009, 09:31
rampuria wrote:
ritula wrote:
A
rampuria wrote:
Once at a conference on the philosophy of
language, a professor delivered a lengthy
and tiresome address the central thesis of
which was that “yes” and related slang
words such as “yeah” can be used only to
show agreement with a proposition
. At
the end of the paper, a listener in the back
of the auditorium stood up and shouted in
a sarcastic voice, “Oh, yeah?” This constituted
a complete refutation of the paper.
The listener argued against the paper by
(A) offering a counter-example
(B) pointing out an inconsistency
(C) presenting an analogy
(D) attacking the speaker’s character
(E) citing additional evidence

Pls explain



RITULA, WHY NOT B?

c,d,e can not be an answer.
Now, between A and B: The listener is not suggesting that the professor's argument is inconsistent. What is the inconsistency. The listener does not agree and hence sarcastically asks oh yeah? This refutes the professor's argument that yeah can only be used to agree with a proposition. Hence, the listener offers a counter example and refutes the professor's premise.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 16 Feb 2009, 09:40
IMO A.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2009, 12:00
What's the OA and the source please? Some of these questions are just strange.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 17 Feb 2009, 12:21
My answer is A. He points out a counter-example.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 18 Feb 2009, 09:12
It is obviously A, and this is obviously an LSAT question or an imitation of an LSAT question.

The professor's claim was that "yes", "yeah" and so on can ONLY be used to indicate agreement with a proposition. That's "proposition", meaning "claim" or "statement", not "preposition", which is a grammatical term. Note that this is a universal if-then claim: If anyone uses the words "yes", "yeah", etc. he or she is necessarily indicating agreement with a statement. Note that the claim is universal, with NO exceptions for tone of voice, context, etc.

The listener clearly used "yeah", and was clearly indicating DISagreement. This is a counterexample: The claim says it cannot happen, but it did. Because the claim was universal, one counterexample is enough to refute it completely.

It is certainly not (B). There was no inconsistency in the professor's argument. It was internally consistent; it consists of a single if-then statement which does not contradict itself. It just happened to be wrong, as the counterexample proves.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 18 Feb 2009, 18:07
Babu Rampuria, it's time for the OA...
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2009, 00:07
Vote for (A), too.

Still waiting for the OA.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2009, 15:01
+1 for A. He used an exclamation to show the counter example and he did not show any inconsistency in using the thesis with prepositions.
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 18 Jul 2009, 09:13
agree with a
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Re: CR- Yes [#permalink] New post 18 Jul 2009, 12:05
IMO - A, what is the official answer?
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Re: CR- Yes   [#permalink] 18 Jul 2009, 12:05
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