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One noted economist has made a comparison of the Federal

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One noted economist has made a comparison of the Federal [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 07:36
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One noted economist has made a comparison of the Federal Reserve and an automobile as racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.
(A) made a comparison of the Federal Reserve and an automobile as racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(B) made a comparison between the Federal Reserve and an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(C) compared the federal Reserve with an automobile as racing through a tunnel and which bounced
(D) compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(E) compared the Federal Reserve with an automobile that races through a tunnel and it bounces
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 08:00
Here compared with should be preferred to compared to as we comparing 2 things that are not similar - Federal Reserve and a car.

However, C is incorrect as it says - ...racing...which bounced
E - ..it bounces...makes the sentence awkward.

B makes the sentence clear and compares Federal Reserve and an automobile (that is) racing...., bouncing...

So, I will go with B
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 08:09
ecotopia wrote:
One noted economist has made a comparison of the Federal Reserve and an automobile as racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.
(A) made a comparison of the Federal Reserve and an automobile as racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(B) made a comparison between the Federal Reserve and an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(C) compared the federal Reserve with an automobile as racing through a tunnel and which bounced
(D) compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(E) compared the Federal Reserve with an automobile that races through a tunnel and it bounces


its D. "comparision to" is required here to make the comparision between unlike things.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 08:44
Prof...you are right I confused compared with/to...(reading my notes again).
In that case D should be correct..
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 08:54
Professor wrote:
ecotopia wrote:
One noted economist has made a comparison of the Federal Reserve and an automobile as racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.
(A) made a comparison of the Federal Reserve and an automobile as racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(B) made a comparison between the Federal Reserve and an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(C) compared the federal Reserve with an automobile as racing through a tunnel and which bounced
(D) compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing
(E) compared the Federal Reserve with an automobile that races through a tunnel and it bounces


its D. "comparision to" is required here to make the comparision between unlike things.


Totally concur!! You nailed it, buddy~!! :wink:
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 09:05
laxieqv wrote:
Totally concur!! You nailed it, buddy~!! :wink:


hi baby, welcome back. i am throwing a party for you.

:cool :beer
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 09:07
Professor wrote:
laxieqv wrote:
Totally concur!! You nailed it, buddy~!! :wink:


hi baby, welcome back. i am throwing a party for you.

:cool :beer


Well, i'm always around, although i seem reclusive once in a while :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 18:44
Agree with D and of course with professor's explaination.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 20:34
Will go with D. Compare to for comparing two unlike things…..
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2006, 21:37
A --> awkward sentence
B --> turns the sentence into one of comparing two items, instead of likening one to the other
C,E --> 'compared with' is incorrect

D is the best choice. 'compared to' is idiomatic
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2007, 22:43
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 01:50
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 01:58
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.


Hi BMW...ok you might be wondering why i am persisting with this. I perfectly understand boucning modifies the car. I wanted to understand if the comma immediately after TUNNEL has any role to play.

Let me explain what I am asking.

What happens if instead of the CAR itself, I wanted to say something about the TUNNEL in this sentence? Let's say

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel [i]without any lights[/i]
Now - does the phrase WITHOUT ANY LIGHTS modify Automobile or Tunnel?

Sample another variant - Now I'll put a comma after Tunnel and use the same phrase

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights

Do you see what's happening and do you have an explanation.

To be honest, this confuses the hell out of me.
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 02:55
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.


Hi BMW...ok you might be wondering why i am persisting with this. I perfectly understand boucning modifies the car. I wanted to understand if the comma immediately after TUNNEL has any role to play.

Let me explain what I am asking.

What happens if instead of the CAR itself, I wanted to say something about the TUNNEL in this sentence? Let's say

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel [i]without any lights[/i]
Now - does the phrase WITHOUT ANY LIGHTS modify Automobile or Tunnel?

Sample another variant - Now I'll put a comma after Tunnel and use the same phrase

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights

Do you see what's happening and do you have an explanation.

To be honest, this confuses the hell out of me.


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights
hmm. i do not think you can connect an independent to a dependent clause with a preposition.

i can think of two ways to modify tunnel
has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel without any lights

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, which was without any lights
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 02:58
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.


Hi BMW...ok you might be wondering why i am persisting with this. I perfectly understand boucning modifies the car. I wanted to understand if the comma immediately after TUNNEL has any role to play.

Let me explain what I am asking.

What happens if instead of the CAR itself, I wanted to say something about the TUNNEL in this sentence? Let's say

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel [i]without any lights[/i]
Now - does the phrase WITHOUT ANY LIGHTS modify Automobile or Tunnel?

Sample another variant - Now I'll put a comma after Tunnel and use the same phrase

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights

Do you see what's happening and do you have an explanation.

To be honest, this confuses the hell out of me.


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights
hmm. i do not think you can connect an independent to a dependent clause with a preposition.

i can think of two ways to modify tunnel
has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel without any lights

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, which was without any lights


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel that was without any lights

the purpose of the comma is to separate the independent clause, forming a complete sentence/independent clause before tacking on a participial phrase
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 03:10
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.


Hi BMW...ok you might be wondering why i am persisting with this. I perfectly understand boucning modifies the car. I wanted to understand if the comma immediately after TUNNEL has any role to play.

Let me explain what I am asking.

What happens if instead of the CAR itself, I wanted to say something about the TUNNEL in this sentence? Let's say

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel [i]without any lights[/i]
Now - does the phrase WITHOUT ANY LIGHTS modify Automobile or Tunnel?

Sample another variant - Now I'll put a comma after Tunnel and use the same phrase

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights

Do you see what's happening and do you have an explanation.

To be honest, this confuses the hell out of me.


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights
hmm. i do not think you can connect an independent to a dependent clause with a preposition.

i can think of two ways to modify tunnel
has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel without any lights

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, which was without any lights


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel that was without any lights

the purpose of the comma is to separate the independent clause, forming a complete sentence/independent clause before tacking on a participial phrase


OK - Let me restate my question. If "without any lights" can be made to modify tunnel, why does BOUNCING (in the original sentence) not modify it (tunnel)?

It's hard to believe just because "bouncing" is participial it will modify the "automobile"

I'm sorry for being so persistent.
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 03:19
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.


Hi BMW...ok you might be wondering why i am persisting with this. I perfectly understand boucning modifies the car. I wanted to understand if the comma immediately after TUNNEL has any role to play.

Let me explain what I am asking.

What happens if instead of the CAR itself, I wanted to say something about the TUNNEL in this sentence? Let's say

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel [i]without any lights[/i]
Now - does the phrase WITHOUT ANY LIGHTS modify Automobile or Tunnel?

Sample another variant - Now I'll put a comma after Tunnel and use the same phrase

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights

Do you see what's happening and do you have an explanation.

To be honest, this confuses the hell out of me.


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights
hmm. i do not think you can connect an independent to a dependent clause with a preposition.

i can think of two ways to modify tunnel
has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel without any lights

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, which was without any lights


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel that was without any lights

the purpose of the comma is to separate the independent clause, forming a complete sentence/independent clause before tacking on a participial phrase


OK - Let me restate my question. If "without any lights" can be made to modify tunnel, why does BOUNCING (in the original sentence) not modify it (tunnel)?

It's hard to believe just because "bouncing" is participial it will modify the "automobile"

I'm sorry for being so persistent.


:-D i am not absolutely sure.

take the "single pronoun, double referent" situation in which only one referent can make sense in the entire context of the stem. that pronoun has a clear referent. it may apply to this situation as well.

by the way, i made a mistake in one of my sentences...catch it?
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Re: SC : FRB [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 03:29
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing first off one wall, then the other: the car may get where it is going, but people may be hurt in the process.

Why doesn't bouncing modify the tunnel?


just realized it is a is participial phrase...


Could you explain this in a bit more detail?



One noted economist has compared the Federal Reserve to an automobile racing through a tunnel, bouncing off one wall, then the other.


Hi BMW...ok you might be wondering why i am persisting with this. I perfectly understand boucning modifies the car. I wanted to understand if the comma immediately after TUNNEL has any role to play.

Let me explain what I am asking.

What happens if instead of the CAR itself, I wanted to say something about the TUNNEL in this sentence? Let's say

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel [i]without any lights[/i]
Now - does the phrase WITHOUT ANY LIGHTS modify Automobile or Tunnel?

Sample another variant - Now I'll put a comma after Tunnel and use the same phrase

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights

Do you see what's happening and do you have an explanation.

To be honest, this confuses the hell out of me.


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, without any lights
hmm. i do not think you can connect an independent to a dependent clause with a preposition.

i can think of two ways to modify tunnel
has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel without any lights

has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel, which was without any lights


has compared the FRB to an automobile racing through a tunnel that was without any lights

the purpose of the comma is to separate the independent clause, forming a complete sentence/independent clause before tacking on a participial phrase


OK - Let me restate my question. If "without any lights" can be made to modify tunnel, why does BOUNCING (in the original sentence) not modify it (tunnel)?

It's hard to believe just because "bouncing" is participial it will modify the "automobile"

I'm sorry for being so persistent.


:-D i am not absolutely sure.

take the "single pronoun, double referent" situation in which only one referent can make sense in the entire context of the stem. that pronoun has a clear referent. it may apply to this situation as well.

by the way, i made a mistake in one of my sentences...catch it?


Never mind.. we'll figure it out someday.. just as we did the single pronoun double referent situation (nice nomenclature there!)

No I didn't spot any error..what was it?
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 08:48
What I don't understand is how you can compare Fed to automobile racing.. Fed should be compared to automobile not automobile racing..
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2007, 09:05
bewakoof wrote:
What I don't understand is how you can compare Fed to automobile racing.. Fed should be compared to automobile not automobile racing..


That's simple - the Fed is being compared to AN AUTOMOBILE RACING thruoug the tunnel ... not Automobile racing - which would be a noun.... The racing part in the original modifies the automobile - it's not to be treated along with Automobile as a noun phrase (automobile racing).
  [#permalink] 25 Jul 2007, 09:05
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