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Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled

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Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2012, 15:57
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85% (02:29) correct 15% (01:36) wrong based on 612 sessions
Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled flights using Greentown's airport will allow the delays that are so common there to be avoided. Hevelia airstrip, 40 miles away, would, if upgraded and expanded, be an attractive alternative for fully 20 percent of the passengers using Greentown airport. Nevertheless, experts reject the claim that turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would end the chronic delays at Greentown.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to justify the experts' position?

(A) Turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would require not only substantial construction at the airport itself, but also the construction of new access highways.

(B) A second largely undeveloped airstrip close to Greentown airport would be a more attractive alternative than Hevelia for many passengers who now use Greentown.

(C) Hevelia airstrip lies in a relatively undeveloped area but would, if it became a full-service airport, be a magnet for commerc ial and residential development.

(D) If an airplane has to wait to land, the extra jet fuel required adds significantly to the airline's costs.

(E) Several airlines use Greentown as a regional hub, so that most flights landing at Greentown have many passengers who then take different flights to reach their final destinations.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2012, 20:53
(E) Several airlines use Greentown as a regional hub, so that most flights landing at Greentown have many passengers who then take different flights to reach their final destinations.

people will continue to land at Greentown and will find it uneasy to catch the different flights , out of which many will be taking off from the other airport, so the congestion will be same and increase hassle for the passengers.
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2012, 03:53
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I couldn't get why E is the right answer But looking at thee other four options i could very easily rule them out.
So E :)
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2012, 02:06
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Given:
Greentown airport is clogged and hence planes are delayed.
Reduction of 10% in the number of scheduled flights at Greentown airport -> Delays avoided

If Hevelia airstrip is upgraded and expanded would take away 20% passengers load from Greentown airport.

(A) Turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would require not only substantial construction at the airport itself, but also the construction of new access highways. - Its already mentioned in the passage that the Hevelia has to be upgraded and expanded. Does not fill in the gap between the premise and conclusion - Incorrect
(B) A second largely undeveloped airstrip close to Greentown airport would be a more attractive alternative than Hevelia for many passengers who now use Greentown. - Hevelia should be able to take away the load from Greentown not by being attractive but by functional - Irrelevant - Incorrect
(C) Hevelia airstrip lies in a relatively undeveloped area but would, if it became a full-service airport, be a magnet for commerc ial and residential development. - Out of Scope - Incorrect
(D) If an airplane has to wait to land, the extra jet fuel required adds significantly to the airline's costs. - Irrelevant information - Incorrect
(E) Several airlines use Greentown as a regional hub, so that most flights landing at Greentown have many passengers who then take different flights to reach their final destinations. - Greentown serves as a hub for many airlines whose passengers wait for their next connectiving flights. Hence most of the scheduled flights are interconnected. Taking away 20% passenger load away would create unnecessary hardship for the passengers who wait for other flights - Correct
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2012, 07:20
sidhu09 wrote:
Given:
Greentown airport is clogged and hence planes are delayed.
Reduction of 10% in the number of scheduled flights at Greentown airport -> Delays avoided

If Hevelia airstrip is upgraded and expanded would take away 20% passengers load from Greentown airport.

(A) Turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would require not only substantial construction at the airport itself, but also the construction of new access highways. - Its already mentioned in the passage that the Hevelia has to be upgraded and expanded. Does not fill in the gap between the premise and conclusion - Incorrect
(B) A second largely undeveloped airstrip close to Greentown airport would be a more attractive alternative than Hevelia for many passengers who now use Greentown. - Hevelia should be able to take away the load from Greentown not by being attractive but by functional - Irrelevant - Incorrect
(C) Hevelia airstrip lies in a relatively undeveloped area but would, if it became a full-service airport, be a magnet for commerc ial and residential development. - Out of Scope - Incorrect
(D) If an airplane has to wait to land, the extra jet fuel required adds significantly to the airline's costs. - Irrelevant information - Incorrect
(E) Several airlines use Greentown as a regional hub, so that most flights landing at Greentown have many passengers who then take different flights to reach their final destinations. - Greentown serves as a hub for many airlines whose passengers wait for their next connectiving flights. Hence most of the scheduled flights are interconnected. Taking away 20% passenger load away would create unnecessary hardship for the passengers who wait for other flights - Correct



That is your assumption ! not given in the passage! we cannot say this.
Taking away 20% passenger load away would create unnecessary hardship for the passengers who wait for other flights
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2012, 22:53
Can someone please explain why C does not make sense or out of scope - Doesn't increase in commercial and residential development mean that possibly more people taking flights and so more demand for flights and hence flight delay does not get any better.

How is this choice out of scope?
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of [#permalink] New post 13 Aug 2012, 09:38
teal wrote:
Can someone please explain why C does not make sense or out of scope - Doesn't increase in commercial and residential development mean that possibly more people taking flights and so more demand for flights and hence flight delay does not get any better.

How is this choice out of scope?


Well what does the main conclusion say --->

Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled flights using Greentown's airport will allow the delays that are so common there to be avoided

We are concerned only about the delays and not anything else , with C both possibilities arise commercial and residential dev could mean more delays or less delays depending on how the construction is done, if the construction is efficient one might actually reduce delays. Hence this option is Out of scope or at the best Neutral
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2012, 09:33
It is a bit odd to see that the right answer in a "strengthener" question attacks a premise! the new airport was supposed to be an "attractive alternative" as mentioned in the stimulus. Are you sure of the source of this question?
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2012, 14:06
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Qassam wrote:
It is a bit odd to see that the right answer in a "strengthener" question attacks a premise! the new airport was supposed to be an "attractive alternative" as mentioned in the stimulus. Are you sure of the source of this question?


This is from OG 13 – #22 in the CR section.

This is framed as a Strengthen question, but it's actually best to think of it as a Weaken!

Note that the argument is deconstructed as

- We need a 10% reduction to help with delays.
- Expanding a nearby airport could make that airport attractive for up to 20% of the passengers.

Then the "experts" basically say "this plan won't work". Since we're asked to justify the experts' opinion, we could think of this as weakening the unstated conclusion "this plan will work."

(E) does not attack a premise. Rather, it basically gives a reason for why switching to the alternative airport won't be a good option for the airlines. The premise states that switch would be appealing to the passengers. Well, if it's appealing to the passengers, but the airlines have a reason not to do it, that weakens the claim that the plan will work!

Hope that helps!

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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2013, 15:56
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2013, 07:19
MarkSullivan wrote:
(E) does not attack a premise. Rather, it basically gives a reason for why switching to the alternative airport won't be a good option for the airlines. The premise states that switch would be appealing to the passengers. Well, if it's appealing to the passengers, but the airlines have a reason not to do it, that weakens the claim that the plan will work!


What is not clear to me is how to interpret E that it won't be a good option for the airlines? It seems to suggest that the plan would reduce "congestion".
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2013, 02:34
Reopening for further discussion. Please justify your answers.

Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled flights using Greentown's airport will allow the delays that are so common there to be avoided. Hevelia airstrip, 40 miles away, would, if upgraded and expanded, be an attractive alternative for fully 20 percent of the passengers using Greentown airport. Nevertheless, experts reject the claim that turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would end the chronic delays at Greentown.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to justify the experts' position?

(A) Turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would require not only substantial construction at the airport itself, but also the construction of new access highways.

(B) A second largely undeveloped airstrip close to Greentown airport would be a more attractive alternative than Hevelia for many passengers who now use Greentown.

(C) Hevelia airstrip lies in a relatively undeveloped area but would, if it became a full-service airport, be a magnet for commerc ial and residential development.

(D) If an airplane has to wait to land, the extra jet fuel required adds significantly to the airline's costs.

(E) Several airlines use Greentown as a regional hub, so that most flights landing at Greentown have many passengers who then take different flights to reach their final destinations.
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2014, 09:51
swati007 wrote:
Reopening for further discussion. Please justify your answers.

Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled flights using Greentown's airport will allow the delays that are so common there to be avoided. Hevelia airstrip, 40 miles away, would, if upgraded and expanded, be an attractive alternative for fully 20 percent of the passengers using Greentown airport. Nevertheless, experts reject the claim that turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would end the chronic delays at Greentown.

Which of the following, if true, most helps to justify the experts' position?


(A) Turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would require not only substantial construction at the airport itself, but also the construction of new access highways.the highways are part of turning Helvetia into a full-service airport, so this does nothing to strengthen the argument

(B) A second largely undeveloped airstrip close to Greentown airport would be a more attractive alternative than Hevelia for many passengers who now use Greentown.The reason behind which this alternative could be more attractive could involve factors besides less delays (e.g. proximity to the center of the city). Also, just because it is MORE attractive to MANY passengers doesn't mean that it encompasses more than 20% of the passengers described in the stimulus.

(C) Hevelia airstrip lies in a relatively undeveloped area but would, if it became a full-service airport, be a magnet for commerc ial and residential development. This does not directly address what it would due to end delays at Greentown

(D) If an airplane has to wait to land, the extra jet fuel required adds significantly to the airline's costs.This has nothing to do with delays at Greentown Airport

(E) Several airlines use Greentown as a regional hub, so that most flights landing at Greentown have many passengers who then take different flights to reach their final destinations.This strengthens the argument the most. All the upgrade of the Helvetia airport claims to do is become a more attractive alternative to passengers. It does not claim to become attractive to these airlines

The answer is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E
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Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2014, 06:08
What is the conclusion of the argument?
Concl: "Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled flights using Greentown's airport will allow the delays that are so common there to be avoided"
OR
Concl: "experts reject the claim that turning Hevelia into a full-service airport would end the chronic delays at Greentown."

Finding conclusion is imp Strengthen/Weaken/Assumption questions?????

Please give ur inputs.

Thanks in Advance,
Rrsnathan.
Re: Only a reduction of 10 percent in the number of scheduled   [#permalink] 09 Apr 2014, 06:08
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