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Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara

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Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 21:54
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A
B
C
D
E

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14. Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work

----------------------------------------------------------------------
What is the rule for Like vs As?

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 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 21:55
14. Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 22:01
C
The rule is to use As when relating actions..and like when relating nouns

Eg: This painting is like that of Michael
He often acts as a fool [does]
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 22:15
Hi Vithal,
Using the same rule, I chose C.

But the OA is A.

So I guess there is an exception to the rule. For example, consider the following:

1a) This perfume smells like jasmine.
1b) This perfume smells as jasmine does.

Which one is right?

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 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 22:29
I think what we are infact comparing is not actions in this example - we are comparing the work of X and with that of Y - so, probably, the rule is correct but the way we applied to this sentence is incorrect!!

here is what webster says:

http://www.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/conj ... s.htm#like[/b]
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 23:02
i wod choose C. Like is used to compare nouns and as is used to compare actions. but here, i am confused.

lets wait for moderators................
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2005, 07:30
Use like to compare nouns, and as to compare actions. In other words, use as when what follows is a clause.

e.g.
Like fine wine, fruitcake tastes better after it has aged
Dogs don't scratch up furniture, as cats often do

In the sentence, we are comparing nouns. Two pieces of work, the novel (deemed to be a seasoned-writer's work) to another work (the apprentice work, although this work does not exist physcially)

So (B) and (C) are out. (D) is bad because of the word 'does' at the end. It turns the meaning of the sentence into a one of verb (reading). The same reasoning applies to (E).

(A) is therefore the best answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2005, 15:36
mckenna wrote:
14. Originally published in 1950, Some Tame Gazelle was Barbara Pym’s first novel, but it does not read like an apprentice work.
(A) does not read like an apprentice work
(B) seems not to read as an apprentice work
(C) does not seem to read as an apprentice work would
(D) does not read like an apprentice work does
(E) reads unlike an apprentice work


do a search on 'like vs. as'
in a nutshell, like means 'similar to', and 'as' is a conjunction that should be followed by a clause containing a subject and a verb.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2005, 16:07
it has to be (A)..

(B): as should be used as conjunction but used here as Preposition.
(C): "as an apprentice would (read)".. wrong sentence
(D): like is a preposition. It should not be used as Conjunction.

We are left with (A) and (E).

(A) is better...
Reason (from my notes.. source testmagic):

There is a very subtle difference between affirming a negative and denying an affirmative.

For example, look at the following sentences. Both exist in English, but one is more logical than the other:

I ate nothing today.

I didn't eat anything today.

The second one would be more logical for GMAT SC because it expresses the lack of an action, whereas the first sentence expresses the existence of an action that did not occur.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2005, 16:13
Like vs. As
Like is used to compare nouns (used as Prepositions).
He ran like a horse. (like --> Preposition)

As is used to compare actions(used as conjunction).
He runs as a horse does. (action is compared --> conjunction)
  [#permalink] 12 Mar 2005, 16:13
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