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Over the last century, paleontologists have used small

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Over the last century, paleontologists have used small [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2008, 12:42
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15.
Over the last century, paleontologists have used small differences between fossil specimens to classify triceratops into sixteen species. This classification is unjustified, however, since the specimens used to distinguish eleven of the species come from animals that lived in the same area at the same time.
Which of the following, if true, would enable the conclusion of the argument to be properly drawn?
(A) Not every species that lived in a given area is preserved as a fossil.
(B) At least one individual of every true species of triceratops bas been discovered as a fossil specimen.
(C) No geographical area ever supports more than three similar species at the same time.
(D) In many species, individuals display quite marked variation.
(E) Differences between fossil specimens of triceratops that came from the same area are no less distinctive than differences between specimens that came from different areas.
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Re: Paper CR2 Test 48 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2008, 00:41
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C

Over the last century, paleontologists have used small differences between fossil specimens to classify triceratops into sixteen species. This classification is unjustified, however, since the specimens used to distinguish eleven of the species come from animals that lived in the same area at the same time.

Which of the following, if true, would enable the conclusion of the argument to be properly drawn?

there is a problem when species come from animals that lived in the same area at the same time

(A) Not every species that lived in a given area is preserved as a fossil. - irrelevant
(B) At least one individual of every true species of triceratops bas been discovered as a fossil specimen. - irrelevant
(C) No geographical area ever supports more than three similar species at the same time. - a good one
(D) In many species, individuals display quite marked variation. - irrelevant
(E) Differences between fossil specimens of triceratops that came from the same area are no less distinctive than differences between specimens that came from different areas. - weaken argument.
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Re: Paper CR2 Test 48 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2008, 02:04
conclusion: 11/16 of the species apparently come from the same area, which is INCORRECT.
We need to find an option that will allow us to say that 11 species in the same area is unreal

GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
15.
Over the last century, paleontologists have used small differences between fossil specimens to classify triceratops into sixteen species. This classification is unjustified, however, since the specimens used to distinguish eleven of the species come from animals that lived in the same area at the same time.
Which of the following, if true, would enable the conclusion of the argument to be properly drawn?
(A) Not every species that lived in a given area is preserved as a fossil. this strengthens the fact that there are 16 species somewhat, we are looking for weakening
(B) At least one individual of every true species of triceratops bas been discovered as a fossil specimen. the strengthens that there are 16 species
(C) No geographical area ever supports more than three similar species at the same time. correct ans. since this proves that 11 species cannot co-exist in the same area at the same time
(D) In many species, individuals display quite marked variation. this sounds correct but too vague to be in solid support of the conclusion
(E) Differences between fossil specimens of triceratops that came from the same area are no less distinctive than differences between specimens that came from different areas. irrelevant,
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Re: Paper CR2 Test 48 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2008, 09:40
agree with buff...C it is
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Re: Paper CR2 Test 48 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2008, 15:37
OA is C
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Re: Paper CR2 Test 48 [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2008, 23:36
This classification is unjustified, however, since the specimens used to distinguish eleven of the species come from animals that lived in the same area at the same time.

The word however seems to contradict the unjustified classification.
IMO however tends to negate the authors claims that classification is unjustified .

Can anybody throw some light on it?
Re: Paper CR2 Test 48   [#permalink] 07 Mar 2008, 23:36
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Over the last century, paleontologists have used small

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