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Paper CR Test 31

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Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2008, 12:56
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6. Finally analyzed the answer and it does make sense, want to see your thoughs. Thx

Demographers doing research for an international economics newsletter claim that the average per capita income in the country of Kuptala is substantially lower than that in the country of Bahlton. They also claim, however, that whereas poverty is relatively rare in Kuptala, over half the population of Bahlton lives in extreme poverty. At least one of the demographers' claims must, therefore, be wrong.
The argument above is most vulnerable to which of the following criticisms?
(A) It rejects an empirical claim about the average per capita incomes in the two countries without making any attempt to discredit that claim by offering additional economic evidence.
(B) It treats the vague term "poverty" as though it had a precise and universally accepted meaning.
(C) It overlooks the possibility that the number of people in the two countries who live in poverty could be the same even though the percentages of the two populations that live in poverty differ markedly.
(D) It fails to show that wealth and poverty have the same social significance in Kuptala as in Bahlton.
(E) It does not consider the possibility that incomes in Kuptala, unlike those in Bahlton, might all be very close to the country's average per capita income.
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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2008, 14:41
It's E.
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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2008, 14:45
GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
6. Finally analyzed the answer and it does make sense, want to see your thoughs. Thx

Demographers doing research for an international economics newsletter claim that the average per capita income in the country of Kuptala is substantially lower than that in the country of Bahlton. They also claim, however, that whereas poverty is relatively rare in Kuptala, over half the population of Bahlton lives in extreme poverty. At least one of the demographers' claims must, therefore, be wrong.
The argument above is most vulnerable to which of the following criticisms?
(A) It rejects an empirical claim about the average per capita incomes in the two countries without making any attempt to discredit that claim by offering additional economic evidence.
(B) It treats the vague term "poverty" as though it had a precise and universally accepted meaning.
(C) It overlooks the possibility that the number of people in the two countries who live in poverty could be the same even though the percentages of the two populations that live in poverty differ markedly.
(D) It fails to show that wealth and poverty have the same social significance in Kuptala as in Bahlton.
(E) It does not consider the possibility that incomes in Kuptala, unlike those in Bahlton, might all be very close to the country's average per capita income.



i think its E, because Bill Gates could be from Bahlton and raise the average capita income to be way over Kuptala, yes all by himself :) .
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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2008, 20:28
GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
6. Finally analyzed the answer and it does make sense, want to see your thoughs. Thx

Demographers doing research for an international economics newsletter claim that the average per capita income in the country of Kuptala is substantially lower than that in the country of Bahlton. They also claim, however, that whereas poverty is relatively rare in Kuptala, over half the population of Bahlton lives in extreme poverty. At least one of the demographers' claims must, therefore, be wrong.
The argument above is most vulnerable to which of the following criticisms?
(A) It rejects an empirical claim about the average per capita incomes in the two countries without making any attempt to discredit that claim by offering additional economic evidence.
(B) It treats the vague term "poverty" as though it had a precise and universally accepted meaning.
(C) It overlooks the possibility that the number of people in the two countries who live in poverty could be the same even though the percentages of the two populations that live in poverty differ markedly.
(D) It fails to show that wealth and poverty have the same social significance in Kuptala as in Bahlton.
(E) It does not consider the possibility that incomes in Kuptala, unlike those in Bahlton, might all be very close to the country's average per capita income.



The question is finding the flaw in counter-argument to the claim of Demographers.

Counter-argument to the claims is: "at least one one of the demographers' claims must, therefore, be wrong".

If we find at least one of the situation that claims of demographers true, then the counter-argument is vulnerable.

C: counter-argument ignored the possibility that the number of people in the two countries who live in poverty could be the same even though the percentages of the two populations that live in poverty differ markedly.

Let say more about C. When population of Kuptala is bigger than that of Bahlton, it is very likely that "average per capita income" of the two is different, one lower than the other, depending on the income information.

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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2008, 22:05
Expert's post
E

income (100,1,1,1) in Bahlton and income (10,10,10,10) in Kuptala explains situation and therefore, the demographers' claims can be true.

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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2008, 09:52
Agree with Walker...E it is
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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2008, 15:39
OA is E
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Re: Paper CR Test 31 [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2008, 01:20
Country Kuptala has lower per capital income compare to Bahlton.
However, Bahlton has more number of people under poverty.


(A) It rejects an empirical claim about the average per capita incomes in the two countries without making any attempt to discredit that claim by offering additional economic evidence.[This is not necessary. It is given two distinct economic factors. – Eliminate it]

(B) It treats the vague term "poverty" as though it had a precise and universally accepted meaning. [ This argument is not about definition – eliminate it]

(C) It overlooks the possibility that the number of people in the two countries who live in poverty could be the same even though the percentages of the two populations that live in poverty differ markedly.[But country Bahlton has extreme poverty. So we cannot assume both countries has same level – eliminate it]

(D) It fails to show that wealth and poverty have the same social significance in Kuptala as in Bahlton.[Social significance is not discussed in the argument – eliminate it]

(E) It does not consider the possibility that incomes in Kuptala, unlike those in Bahlton, might all be very close to the country's average per capita income.[Hold it]

Answer: E
Re: Paper CR Test 31   [#permalink] 03 Feb 2008, 01:20
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