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Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job.

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Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2006, 14:20
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Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. Many blame schools for low student achievement scores. Surprisingly, the most frequent and vociferous complaints come from those who live in districts where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.
B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.
C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.
D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.
E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2006, 14:55
Going for E here....
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Re: CR : Parents [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2006, 15:03
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. Many blame schools for low student achievement scores. Surprisingly, the most frequent and vociferous complaints come from those who live in districts where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.

There may be parents of low achivers in districts of high achievers who can complain. So this can answer the paradox

B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.

Ignorance is not bliss. So this can answer the paradox

C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.

This is a seperate group where the bar is set high each time a record is broken. We are talking about low scores and let the scope be within it.
So this is my answer


D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.

Possible

E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.

May be the elite politicians who live in the district are caring for their people
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2006, 16:24
trivikram has a good point
After looking at his post, I changed my answer from E to C..
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 00:19
C is better.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 03:08
Agree C
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 12:30
Agree c
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 12:57
My question is does "those" refer to parents or not. If so then my choice is E. As it does not explain the paradox of parents in these districts complaining. If not then I am with everyone else. Without looking I chose E first but I do grasp the other argument.

It would be logical to assume those refers to parents. But we all know what happens when we assume...

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Re: CR : Parents [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 13:07
Paradox :Parents blame schools for low scores.Parents live in school district where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.
>>>>explains the paradox(May be the well-informed parents want their children to excel.)

B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.
>>>>explains the paradox(Since parents don't have a reference number they dont know what to comapre their children's scores with. So they think their children are scoring low)

C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.
>>>explains the paradox.(May be the well-informed parents want their children to excel.)

D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.
>>>>>>explains the paradox.It is self explanatory

E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.
>>>This situation seems out of context.The paradox is limited to parents and schools of a school district.
Does not explain the paradox.

I pick E
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 17:09
Need more discussion :-D
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Re: CR : Parents [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2006, 18:59
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. Many blame schools for low student achievement scores. Surprisingly, the most frequent and vociferous complaints come from those who live in districts where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.

This explains.

B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.

My answer. How will parents ignorance make them complain? They can as well praise their childrens' performance. Also this option does not talk any thing specificially about parents in districts where students' performance is high.

C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.

This also explains.

D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.

Parents of low-achieving students see high-achieving students and complain. D also explains the paradox.

E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.

Those can refer to either activists or parents or both. Political activists live in those areas and they make vociferous comments about schools not doing the job. E is also explaining the paradox.

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 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2006, 09:28
B for me..

The paradox is that parents of students in high achieving schools complain the most. If parents have no knowledge of their own district's scores, then parents of high achieving schools should not complain..

This does not explain the paradox
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2006, 10:51
Quote:
Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. Many blame schools for low student achievement scores. Surprisingly, the most frequent and vociferous complaints come from those who live in districts where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.
B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.
C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.
D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.
E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.


Parents blame schools for "low" test scores when really, they are not low, the scores are actually high. What could explain this paradox?

C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve more.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2006, 11:08
buckkitty wrote:
Quote:
Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. Many blame schools for low student achievement scores. Surprisingly, the most frequent and vociferous complaints come from those who live in districts where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.
B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.
C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.
D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.
E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.


Parents blame schools for "low" test scores when really, they are not low, the scores are actually high. What could explain this paradox?

C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve more.


Watch out for this trap. This is an EXCEPT question.

Answer E
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2006, 11:17
So what is the OA, I can't seem to decide between B and E
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2006, 11:52
My pick is C...

A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.

Explains... parents are involved...

B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.

This also explains... Even if parents don't know how is the class is doing, a low score is low score.. Their experience may tell what is a low score and what is not.. Can you really justify your low GMAT score if all your other classmates score low in GMAT.. who cares? This score is low, and you suck..

C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.

I think this does not explain.. Even if the expectations gets high, it does not mean one should complain that the current scores are low...


D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.

This explains too... If the high scoring districts are too many to give too many low scoring students whose parents complain...


E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.

[b]This explains too.. so what who is complaining.. they may be adding to the total volume of the complaints.



What's the OA and why?[/b]
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Dec 2006, 11:52
OA=B
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Re: CR : Parents [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2006, 21:55
Swagatalakshmi wrote:
Parents often criticize schools for not doing their job. Many blame schools for low student achievement scores. Surprisingly, the most frequent and vociferous complaints come from those who live in districts where the achievement scores are high.

All of the following, considered individually, help to explain the apparent paradox EXCEPT:
A. Parents from districts of high achievers are very involved with the schools and are, therefore, more likely to make critical comments.
B. Parents have no knowledge of their district's own scores.
C. High scores cause parents' expectations to rise leading parents to demand that students achieve even more.
D. High-scoring districts contain low-achieving students whose parents are likely to complain when their children score below the local average.
E. Most complaints about schools come from political activists, most of whom live in high-achieving districts.


This one actually should be relatively easy. We want to explain why parents in high score districts complains more. All explanations that says something about high score districts may be a possible explanation. However, B didn't single out high score district. If parents did not know their district's score, there should be equal chance of a complaining parent coming from a low score district and a high score district. In other words B did not explain the paradox.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2006, 22:14
Seems CR is not so easy.. Wish I had had a logic course during my UG.. :)

Several ways to look at the same things, and answer differently.. but there is only one right way... I was thinking the same, however when someone says OA is different, one has to scratch his head a little bit..

how do we know given OA, the so called correct or original answer, is correct? Why don't we call it CA? CA = Correct Answer.. ??
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2006, 22:20
OA means official answer, in other words, the answer that is given by the source of the question. OA can be incorrect, depending on the source.
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  [#permalink] 10 Dec 2006, 22:20
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