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Past participle as a verb modifier?

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Intern
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Joined: 02 Oct 2013
Posts: 5
Location: New Zealand
Concentration: Leadership, General Management
Schools: HBS '17
GMAT Date: 08-27-2014
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
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Past participle as a verb modifier? [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2013, 14:55
Hi All,

Am I right that a past participle can never be a verb modifer? If the verb-ed form is used as a modifier, it has to be a noun modifier, right?

Thank you for your input.

Cheers,
Ray
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Manhattan GMAT Instructor
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Re: Past participle as a verb modifier? [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2013, 14:05
Expert's post
Generally speaking, participle phrases (both -ed and -ing forms of participles) will be noun modifiers.
--Exhausted from running the marathon, Tom slept for 18 hours. -or- Tom, exhausted from running the marathon, slept for 18 hours.
--Working until nearly midnight, Sarah finally finished her school project. -or- Sarah, working until nearly midnight, finally finished her school project.
[The participle phrases modify the nouns they touch, either the leading or trailing nouns.]

The exception is when we have comma + 'ing' participles, in which case these modifiers will often be adverbial modifiers.
Dennis left work 15 minutes late, forcing him to run to catch the train.
[This participle phrase is adverbial and modifies the preceding clause, giving the result of the clause.]

So, yes, if you are dealing with a past participle modifier (-ed form) it will function as a noun modifier.

KW
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Kyle Widdison | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | Utah


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Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Oct 2013
Posts: 5
Location: New Zealand
Concentration: Leadership, General Management
Schools: HBS '17
GMAT Date: 08-27-2014
GPA: 4
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 2

Re: Past participle as a verb modifier? [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2013, 01:11
KyleWiddison wrote:
Generally speaking, participle phrases (both -ed and -ing forms of participles) will be noun modifiers.
--Exhausted from running the marathon, Tom slept for 18 hours. -or- Tom, exhausted from running the marathon, slept for 18 hours.
--Working until nearly midnight, Sarah finally finished her school project. -or- Sarah, working until nearly midnight, finally finished her school project.
[The participle phrases modify the nouns they touch, either the leading or trailing nouns.]

The exception is when we have comma + 'ing' participles, in which case these modifiers will often be adverbial modifiers.
Dennis left work 15 minutes late, forcing him to run to catch the train.
[This participle phrase is adverbial and modifies the preceding clause, giving the result of the clause.]

So, yes, if you are dealing with a past participle modifier (-ed form) it will function as a noun modifier.

KW


Hi Kyle,

Thank you very much for your answer.
Now I understand better how the present participle became a adverbial modifier. Mike provided me with an example here:
The stocks of XYZ Corporation plummeted yesterday, caused by the falling price of gold.

I think it makes perfect sense but would be great if you can share some thoughts on it too.

Again really appreciate your help and wish you a Happy New Year.

Cheers,
Ray
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Posts: 501
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Re: Past participle as a verb modifier? [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2013, 13:45
Expert's post
I agree with Mike in his post. That construction does make sense, but it's hard to think of a GMAT example using that structure (I would be interested to know if anyone has a GMAT example).

What you should notice from Mike's example is that it's structurally similar to the previous example of present participles becoming adverbial modifiers. If you understand that structure (clause + comma + participle) then you will be prepared in the rare event that one of these comes up for you on the GMAT.

KW

Happy New Year!
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Kyle Widdison | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | Utah


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Re: Past participle as a verb modifier?   [#permalink] 30 Dec 2013, 13:45
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