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People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position

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People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2012, 13:24
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Question Stats:

57% (02:43) correct 43% (08:50) wrong based on 195 sessions
People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position should not bother to say, “I mean every word!” For either their position truly is ridiculous, in which case insisting that they are serious about it only exposes them to deeper embarrassment, or else their position has merit, in which case they should meet disbelief with rational argument rather than with assurances of their sincerity.

Which one of the following arguments is most similar in its reasoning to the argument above?
(A) A practice that has been denounced as a poor practice should not be defended on the grounds that “this is how we have always done it.” If the practice is a poor one, so much the worse that it has been extensively used; if it is not a poor one, there must be a better reason for engaging in it than inertia.
(B) People who are asked why they eat some of the unusual foods they eat should not answer, “because that is what I like.” This sort of answer will sound either naive or evasive and thus will satisfy no one.
(C) People whose taste in clothes is being criticized should not reply, “Every penny I spent on these clothes I earned honestly.” For the issue raised by the critics is not how the money was come by but rather whether it was spent wisely.
(D) Scholars who champion unpopular new theories should not assume that the widespread rejection of their ideas shows that they “must be on the right track.” The truth is that few theories of any consequence are either wholly right or wholly wrong and thus there is no substitute for patient work in ascertaining which parts are right.
(E) People who set themselves goals that others denounce as overly ambitious do little to silence their critics if they say, “I can accomplish this if anyone can.” Rather, those people should either admit that their critics are right or not dignify the criticism with any reply.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2012, 20:52
Took me 6 minutes :x
Tough question indeed. Thanks for sharing.

The answer is A. I started with the POE and in the end was left with A and E.
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2012, 22:17
A is the obvious answer...
only option alligned with the argument..

Someting regards as X.... if X bla.. bla... , else ..bla.. bla...

Option A has this structure and hence is the OA
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 17 Sep 2012, 13:05
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(A)The first step in this Parallel Reasoning question is to abstract from the specifics of the stimulus. In general terms, the stimulus provides a case in which a statement uttered in response to a particular situation is attacked as an ineffectual response; there are only two possible scenarios, and both expose the futility of the statement (if the original position is wrong, the given response would make matters look worse; if the position is right; the response does nothing to prove it). The parallel choice we’re looking for should therefore show that a given response shouldn’t be used because, whether the party under attack is right or wrong, the response is ineffective. We don’t have to look far. (A) says that when a practice has been denounced, it shouldn’t be defended by saying, “this is how we’ve always done it.” The reason for this is exactly parallel to the original’s “lose-lose” element: if the practice is a poor one, the response makes matters look even worse; if the practice is wise, the answer doesn’t provide good support for it. (A) fits the stimulus form to a T.

(B) Unlike the stimulus, there’s no issue of the initial opinion being right or wrong. Instead of being presented with two cases where a person who eats strange foods is wrong or right to do so, we’re given two ways the response will sound unsatisfying.

(C) also begins with a response people shouldn’t make, but instead of showing why the justification is pointless in the cases of the person being right and being wrong, the argument attacks the response for avoiding the issue.

(D) again fails to show why the scholars’ response is no good whether they are right or wrong, implying instead that they are probably partly right and partly wrong.

(E) fails because it recommends two better ways of responding (admission of error or silence), whereas the stimulus was primarily interested in describing why the original response was no good whether the original statement was right or wrong.
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 17 Sep 2012, 13:54
+1 A

The key in this type of questions is that you have to make an abstraction of the relationships among the parts of the argument.
In other words, traduce in your words and in abstract terms what is happening in the original argument.
In this case:
If someone criticize you, don't say "X", because if they are right they will think you are dumb. If you 're right, there is a better argument than "X".

I think I deserve kudos ;)
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2012, 10:52
Legendaddy wrote:
People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position should not bother to say, “I mean every word!” For either their position truly is ridiculous, in which case insisting that they are serious about it only exposes them to deeper embarrassment, or else their position has merit, in which case they should meet disbelief with rational argument rather than with assurances of their sincerity.

Which one of the following arguments is most similar in its reasoning to the argument above?
(A) A practice that has been denounced as a poor practice should not be defended on the grounds that “this is how we have always done it.” If the practice is a poor one, so much the worse that it has been extensively used; if it is not a poor one, there must be a better reason for engaging in it than inertia.
(B) People who are asked why they eat some of the unusual foods they eat should not answer, “because that is what I like.” This sort of answer will sound either naive or evasive and thus will satisfy no one.
(C) People whose taste in clothes is being criticized should not reply, “Every penny I spent on these clothes I earned honestly.” For the issue raised by the critics is not how the money was come by but rather whether it was spent wisely.
(D) Scholars who champion unpopular new theories should not assume that the widespread rejection of their ideas shows that they “must be on the right track.” The truth is that few theories of any consequence are either wholly right or wholly wrong and thus there is no substitute for patient work in ascertaining which parts are right.
(E) People who set themselves goals that others denounce as overly ambitious do little to silence their critics if they say, “I can accomplish this if anyone can.” Rather, those people should either admit that their critics are right or not dignify the criticism with any reply.



Do we receive such kind of questions in GmAT.....can someone post any question from GMAT prep or official guide of the above kind?
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2012, 11:12
+1 A i did it in 2 mins...:) kudos to myself...he he he!
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 15 Oct 2012, 04:53
Expert's post
Shouldn't the words of the stimulus be considered?
In the stem, it says if x, then blah blah, and if y then they "should" blah blah.
But none of the answer option considers this fact?
I understand that abstraction makes it easier for us to choose A, but my question is why abstraction > intent?
Help me understand the concept. I am pretty much naive in CR.
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2012, 04:01
Legendaddy wrote:
(A)The first step in this Parallel Reasoning question is to abstract from the specifics of the stimulus. In general terms, the stimulus provides a case in which a statement uttered in response to a particular situation is attacked as an ineffectual response; there are only two possible scenarios, and both expose the futility of the statement (if the original position is wrong, the given response would make matters look worse; if the position is right; the response does nothing to prove it). The parallel choice we’re looking for should therefore show that a given response shouldn’t be used because, whether the party under attack is right or wrong, the response is ineffective. We don’t have to look far. (A) says that when a practice has been denounced, it shouldn’t be defended by saying, “this is how we’ve always done it.” The reason for this is exactly parallel to the original’s “lose-lose” element: if the practice is a poor one, the response makes matters look even worse; if the practice is wise, the answer doesn’t provide good support for it. (A) fits the stimulus form to a T.

(B) Unlike the stimulus, there’s no issue of the initial opinion being right or wrong. Instead of being presented with two cases where a person who eats strange foods is wrong or right to do so, we’re given two ways the response will sound unsatisfying.

(C) also begins with a response people shouldn’t make, but instead of showing why the justification is pointless in the cases of the person being right and being wrong, the argument attacks the response for avoiding the issue.

(D) again fails to show why the scholars’ response is no good whether they are right or wrong, implying instead that they are probably partly right and partly wrong.

(E) fails because it recommends two better ways of responding (admission of error or silence), whereas the stimulus was primarily interested in describing why the original response was no good whether the original statement was right or wrong.



Yes close to how I figured it out, thanks for putting it all down in words Legendaddy, now if I could just do this under 2:12 cause this kind of timing on the actual GMAT will hurt bad....

and OP what a question! Please share more such questions, great going kudos to both of you.
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2012, 04:02
harkabir wrote:
Legendaddy wrote:
(A)The first step in this Parallel Reasoning question is to abstract from the specifics of the stimulus. In general terms, the stimulus provides a case in which a statement uttered in response to a particular situation is attacked as an ineffectual response; there are only two possible scenarios, and both expose the futility of the statement (if the original position is wrong, the given response would make matters look worse; if the position is right; the response does nothing to prove it). The parallel choice we’re looking for should therefore show that a given response shouldn’t be used because, whether the party under attack is right or wrong, the response is ineffective. We don’t have to look far. (A) says that when a practice has been denounced, it shouldn’t be defended by saying, “this is how we’ve always done it.” The reason for this is exactly parallel to the original’s “lose-lose” element: if the practice is a poor one, the response makes matters look even worse; if the practice is wise, the answer doesn’t provide good support for it. (A) fits the stimulus form to a T.

(B) Unlike the stimulus, there’s no issue of the initial opinion being right or wrong. Instead of being presented with two cases where a person who eats strange foods is wrong or right to do so, we’re given two ways the response will sound unsatisfying.

(C) also begins with a response people shouldn’t make, but instead of showing why the justification is pointless in the cases of the person being right and being wrong, the argument attacks the response for avoiding the issue.

(D) again fails to show why the scholars’ response is no good whether they are right or wrong, implying instead that they are probably partly right and partly wrong.

(E) fails because it recommends two better ways of responding (admission of error or silence), whereas the stimulus was primarily interested in describing why the original response was no good whether the original statement was right or wrong.



Yes close to how I figured it out, thanks for putting it all down in words Legendaddy, now if I could just do this under 2:12 cause this kind of timing on the actual GMAT will hurt bad....

and OP what a question! Please share more such questions, great going kudos to both of you.


Oh !! Legendaddy you are the OP!!! :D 2 kudos to you then.
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2012, 07:49
Legendaddy wrote:
(A)The first step in this Parallel Reasoning question is to abstract from the specifics of the stimulus. In general terms, the stimulus provides a case in which a statement uttered in response to a particular situation is attacked as an ineffectual response; there are only two possible scenarios, and both expose the futility of the statement (if the original position is wrong, the given response would make matters look worse; if the position is right; the response does nothing to prove it). The parallel choice we’re looking for should therefore show that a given response shouldn’t be used because, whether the party under attack is right or wrong, the response is ineffective. We don’t have to look far. (A) says that when a practice has been denounced, it shouldn’t be defended by saying, “this is how we’ve always done it.” The reason for this is exactly parallel to the original’s “lose-lose” element: if the practice is a poor one, the response makes matters look even worse; if the practice is wise, the answer doesn’t provide good support for it. (A) fits the stimulus form to a T.

(B) Unlike the stimulus, there’s no issue of the initial opinion being right or wrong. Instead of being presented with two cases where a person who eats strange foods is wrong or right to do so, we’re given two ways the response will sound unsatisfying.

(C) also begins with a response people shouldn’t make, but instead of showing why the justification is pointless in the cases of the person being right and being wrong, the argument attacks the response for avoiding the issue.

(D) again fails to show why the scholars’ response is no good whether they are right or wrong, implying instead that they are probably partly right and partly wrong.

(E) fails because it recommends two better ways of responding (admission of error or silence), whereas the stimulus was primarily interested in describing why the original response was no good whether the original statement was right or wrong.



Does GMAT ask such question? As I never saw any question of the above type in Official Guide?
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2012, 08:27
vivekdixit07 wrote:
Does GMAT ask such question? As I never saw any question of the above type in Official Guide?

Parallel reasoning questions are rare animals in the GMAT jungle, and most people don't see it, no matter how well they might be doing.
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2012, 09:25
Legendaddy wrote:
vivekdixit07 wrote:
Does GMAT ask such question? As I never saw any question of the above type in Official Guide?

Parallel reasoning questions are rare animals in the GMAT jungle, and most people don't see it, no matter how well they might be doing.

01:47 minutes, was very straightforward for me...! :roll:
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Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position [#permalink] New post 30 May 2013, 21:24
I got this right in 1:54 minutes. But in a pressure-cooker situation, this question is a real pain. Tough for folks like me who are not conversant with the art of abstracting arguments :(
Re: People who take what others regard as a ridiculous position   [#permalink] 30 May 2013, 21:24
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