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Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 07:31
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

41% (02:38) correct 59% (00:39) wrong based on 26 sessions
Q. How many four-digit odd numbers do not use any digit more than once?
A. 1728;
B. 2160;
C. 2240;
D. 2268;
E 2520

Please provide your explanation when answering the question. I have an answer in front of me, along with the explanation. But, the explanation is not clear ... looking for an alternative explanation. Thank you.


[Reveal] Spoiler:
The answer is C, 2240.

Explanation from the book makes more sense now that I've thought about it a bit more.

Let ABCD be your four digits; D has to be odd since the four-digit number is odd (5 odd digits from the sequence). A has 8 options (1 thru 9, but one of the unit is reserved for digit D); B has 8 options aswell (0 thru 9, again one digit is reserved for digit D); C has 7 options (0 thru 9; one digit accounted for D and two A and B); D has 5 options since it must be odd.

8*8*7*5 = 2240

What threw me off was my assumtion that all four digits must be odd, but for a number to be odd only the last digit has to be odd. Hope this helps.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 07:35
Expert's post
Please continue discussion in the PS Forum
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 09:05
Answer should be D.

Let a 4-digit number be represented by ABCD

Here A can have any value between 1 to 9 - so total 9
B can have any value between 0 to 9, but not A - so total 9
C can have any value between 0 to 9, but not A or B - so total 8
D can have any value between 0 to 9, but not A, B or C - so total 7

No. of ALL possible 4-digit nos (without repeating any digit) = 9*9*8*7 = 4536
Half of these would be odd.
Therefor, no. of ODD possible 4-digit nos (without repeating any digit) = 4536 / 2 = 2268
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 09:09
The asnwer is E, 2520.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 11:18
abhitheCEO wrote:
The asnwer is E, 2520.


will appreciate if you can provide the details as well.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 15:46
my choice is 'B' 2160.
OA plz.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 16:00
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Thank you all who responded.

The answer is C, 2240.

Explanation from the book makes more sense now that I've thought about it a bit more.

Let ABCD be your four digits; D has to be odd since the four-digit number is odd (5 odd digits from the sequence). A has 8 options (1 thru 9, but one of the unit is reserved for digit D); B has 8 options aswell (0 thru 9, again one digit is reserved for digit D); C has 7 options (0 thru 9; one digit accounted for D and two A and B); D has 5 options since it must be odd.

8*8*7*5 = 2240

What threw me off was my assumtion that all four digits must be odd, but for a number to be odd only the last digit has to be odd. Hope this helps.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 21:30
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 21:45
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This question has to be solved reverse
ABCD is a 4 digit number

Since D (the unit digit) has to be odd, we have 5 choices => D=5
Starting from A;
A can hold 1 to 9, but cannot contain the digit in unit position, so choices will be 8 => A = 8
B can gold 0 to 9 (10 choices), but not the digits in A and D, so we ahve 8 options => B = 8
C can also hold 0 to 9 (10 choices), but not the digits in A, B and D, se we have 7 choices => C = 7

Calculating the total number of options = A*B*C*D = 8*8*7*5 = 2240

IMO C
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2009, 23:25
2240.
Exactlt same sol. as EnergySP.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 10 Jun 2009, 06:17
I wonder as to why shud i not solve it the other around...


tha last digit can have 5 ways.
the second last digit can have 9 ways. ( 0-9) except the last digit.
the third last digit cab have 8 ways ( 0-9) except the last and the second last digit.
the fourth last digit can have 6 ways ( as no zero, last digiht, second last, thirdt last)

hence the total will be 45*48 = 2160 ways..

can anyone tell me from where am i missing the extra 80 ways..
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 10 Jun 2009, 08:33
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Neochronic wrote:
I wonder as to why shud i not solve it the other around...


tha last digit can have 5 ways.
the second last digit can have 9 ways. ( 0-9) except the last digit.
the third last digit cab have 8 ways ( 0-9) except the last and the second last digit.
the fourth last digit can have 6 ways ( as no zero, last digiht, second last, thirdt last)

hence the total will be 45*48 = 2160 ways..

can anyone tell me from where am i missing the extra 80 ways..


The highlighted part is correct only if second, third and fourth digits don't equal zero. Otherwise, we will have 7 ways.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 05 Jan 2011, 07:21
EnergySP wrote:
Thank you all who responded.

The answer is C, 2240.

Explanation from the book makes more sense now that I've thought about it a bit more.

Let ABCD be your four digits; D has to be odd since the four-digit number is odd (5 odd digits from the sequence). A has 8 options (1 thru 9, but one of the unit is reserved for digit D); B has 8 options aswell (0 thru 9, again one digit is reserved for digit D); C has 7 options (0 thru 9; one digit accounted for D and two A and B); D has 5 options since it must be odd.

8*8*7*5 = 2240

What threw me off was my assumtion that all four digits must be odd, but for a number to be odd only the last digit has to be odd. Hope this helps.


I know it is an old post but I received 2160 as an answer and can´t figure out which one is correct.

I start from the last digit:
5 possiblities for the last digit
9 possibilities or the 3rd digit
8 for the 2nd and
6 for the 1st

So we have 6*8*9*5=2160

But EnergySP solution is also correct. Now I am confused.
Can somebody help?
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 05 Jan 2011, 09:06
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medanova wrote:
EnergySP wrote:
Thank you all who responded.

The answer is C, 2240.

Explanation from the book makes more sense now that I've thought about it a bit more.

Let ABCD be your four digits; D has to be odd since the four-digit number is odd (5 odd digits from the sequence). A has 8 options (1 thru 9, but one of the unit is reserved for digit D); B has 8 options aswell (0 thru 9, again one digit is reserved for digit D); C has 7 options (0 thru 9; one digit accounted for D and two A and B); D has 5 options since it must be odd.

8*8*7*5 = 2240

What threw me off was my assumtion that all four digits must be odd, but for a number to be odd only the last digit has to be odd. Hope this helps.


I know it is an old post but I received 2160 as an answer and can´t figure out which one is correct.

I start from the last digit:
5 possiblities for the last digit
9 possibilities or the 3rd digit
8 for the 2nd and
6 for the 1st

So we have 6*8*9*5=2160

But EnergySP solution is also correct. Now I am confused.
Can somebody help?


See Walker's post above: you'll have 6 choices for the 1st digit if 2nd or 3rd digit doesn't equal to zero, otherwise you'll have 7 choices. So this approach is not correct.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 05 Jan 2011, 11:34
four Digit Number which is odd i.e it must end with 1,3,5,7 or 9


So if following 4 blanks represent the 4 digit number:

- - - -

Unit's place can be filled in by any of the 5 digits (1,3,5,7 or9)


so we get,


- - - 5

We are left with 9 other numbers to fill in the rest, but we cannot repeat and first digit cannot be zero otherwise the number will not be truly 4 digit number.

Hence,

8*8*7*5= 2240 (ans. C)
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 01 Jun 2011, 07:07
Why can't we approach from the first number

1. Cannot be "0", hence number of options - 9
2. Leaving the number in 1st place, gives options - 9 again
3. Leaving the number in 1st/ 2nd place, gives options - 8
4. Last has to be an ODD number, so options -5

So numbers possible = 9X9X8X5 =3240
we do not have any options so the answer is definitely WRONG. Is it because the number of options that i am putting for last digit "5" is incorrect because some of them may have already been used up in 1/2/3 rd places.

So what should be the GENERIC order to giving the number of options possible in such problems?
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 01 Jun 2011, 07:25
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CyberAsh wrote:
Why can't we approach from the first number

1. Cannot be "0", hence number of options - 9
2. Leaving the number in 1st place, gives options - 9 again
3. Leaving the number in 1st/ 2nd place, gives options - 8
4. Last has to be an ODD number, so options -5

So numbers possible = 9X9X8X5 =3240
we do not have any options so the answer is definitely WRONG. Is it because the number of options that i am putting for last digit "5" is incorrect because some of them may have already been used up in 1/2/3 rd places.

So what should be the GENERIC order to giving the number of options possible in such problems?


I think you should look for something called "Slot Method" in MGMAT guide for P&C.

The idea is to assign the number in ascending order of restriction.

Units place: 1,3,5,7,9- Total=5(Most restrictive)
Thousands place: No 0 and not the digit used by units place- Total=8 (Less restrictive)
Tens place: 2 digits used. Left:10-2=8 (Yet less restrictive)
Hundreds place: 3 digits used. Left:10-3=7(Yet less restrictive)

Total=5*8*8*7=2240

Ans: "C"
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 01 Jun 2011, 15:42
fluke wrote:
CyberAsh wrote:
Why can't we approach from the first number

1. Cannot be "0", hence number of options - 9
2. Leaving the number in 1st place, gives options - 9 again
3. Leaving the number in 1st/ 2nd place, gives options - 8
4. Last has to be an ODD number, so options -5

So numbers possible = 9X9X8X5 =3240
we do not have any options so the answer is definitely WRONG. Is it because the number of options that i am putting for last digit "5" is incorrect because some of them may have already been used up in 1/2/3 rd places.

So what should be the GENERIC order to giving the number of options possible in such problems?


I think you should look for something called "Slot Method" in MGMAT guide for P&C.

The idea is to assign the number in ascending order of restriction.

Units place: 1,3,5,7,9- Total=5(Most restrictive)
Thousands place: No 0 and not the digit used by units place- Total=8 (Less restrictive)
Tens place: 2 digits used. Left:10-2=8 (Yet less restrictive)
Hundreds place: 3 digits used. Left:10-3=7(Yet less restrictive)

Total=5*8*8*7=2240

Ans: "C"
Thanks, much appreciated.
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Re: Permutation question [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2011, 00:23
ABCD

D has 5 options
A has 8 options
B has 7 options + 1 option of 0.
C has 7 options

8*8*7*5
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Re: Permutation question   [#permalink] 13 Jun 2011, 00:23
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