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Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite

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Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 09:59
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Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite different from always doing what one most strongly desires to do. This is because the rational pursuit of happiness must include consideration of long-term consequences, whereas our desires are usually focused on the short term. Moreover, desires are sometimes compulsions, and while ordinary desires result in at least momentary happiness when their goals are attained, compulsions strongly drive a person to pursue goals that offer no happiness even when reached

If all of the philosopher's statements are true, each of the following could be true EXCEPT:
(A) the majority of people do not have compulsions.
(B) Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.
(C) Most people do not pursue happiness rationally.
(D) Most people want more than their own personal happiness.
(E) All actions have long-term consequences.

OA will be posted later.

Why not E?

Passage does not state that All actions have long term consequences, only that happiness must include long term consequences.
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Last edited by BlueRobin on 09 Sep 2010, 10:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 10:08
BlueRobin wrote:
Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite different from always doing what one most strongly desires to do. This is because the rational pursuit of happiness must include consideration of long-term consequences, whereas our desires are usually focused on the short term. Moreover, desires are sometimes compulsions, and while ordinary desires result in at least momentary happiness when their goals are attained, compulsions strongly drive a person to pursue goals that offer no happiness even when reached

If all of the philosopher's statements are true, each of the following could be true EXCEPT:
(A) the majority of people do not have compulsions.
(B) Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.
(C) Most people do not pursue happiness rationally.
(D) Most people want more than their own personal happiness.
(E) All actions have long-term consequences.

OA will be posted later.


(B) is the only statement that is contradicted by what is said in the argument.
...desires are sometimes compulsions...
...compulsions strongly drive a person to pursue goals that offer no happiness even when reached...


So in my opinion answer should be B
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 11:21
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 14:22
BlueRobin wrote:
Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite different from always doing what one most strongly desires to do. This is because the rational pursuit of happiness must include consideration of long-term consequences, whereas our desires are usually focused on the short term. Moreover, desires are sometimes compulsions, and while ordinary desires result in at least momentary happiness when their goals are attained, compulsions strongly drive a person to pursue goals that offer no happiness even when reached

If all of the philosopher's statements are true, each of the following could be true EXCEPT:
(A) the majority of people do not have compulsions.
(B) Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.
Conclusion says compulsions strongly drive a person to pursue goals that offer no happiness even when reached.
(C) Most people do not pursue happiness rationally.
(D) Most people want more than their own personal happiness.
(E) All actions have long-term consequences.

OA will be posted later.

Why not E?

Passage does not state that All actions have long term consequences, only that happiness must include long term consequences.

Why not E, because the question stem says "could be true."
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 16:32
B. this is not true because there are instances in the passage about rational pursuit which is not neccessarily desire. Also E is not true because the passage said some actions have short consequences and E is "absolute" so false
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 22:17
B ..what a question to start ur day !!!

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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 23:31
shaselai wrote:
B. this is not true because there are instances in the passage about rational pursuit which is not neccessarily desire. Also E is not true because the passage said some actions have short consequences and E is "absolute" so false


Thanks, kudos for your reply.

But, i still have a doubt with E, because E cannot be true.

All actions have long term consequences is extreme, actions can have long term consequences or short term.

So saying all actions have long term consequences is not true. Does it mean one should not take extreme answers even though it can not be true.?

B cannot be true because
Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.

Any desire includes short term desires result in happiness and compulsions do not lead to happiness.

Thanks.
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 09 Sep 2010, 23:39
BlueRobin wrote:
shaselai wrote:
B. this is not true because there are instances in the passage about rational pursuit which is not neccessarily desire. Also E is not true because the passage said some actions have short consequences and E is "absolute" so false


Thanks, kudos for your reply.

But, i still have a doubt with E, because E cannot be true.

All actions have long term consequences is extreme, actions can have long term consequences or short term.

So saying all actions have long term consequences is not true. Does it mean one should not take extreme answers even though it can not be true.?

B cannot be true because
Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.

Any desire includes short term desires result in happiness and compulsions do not lead to happiness.

Thanks.


There is nothing in the passage which contradicts the truth of (E). The passage at best says some actions have long term and others short term consequences, but it never says that the ones that have short term consequences cannot also have long term ones. So the passage can hold true simultaneously with e.
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2010, 02:29
IMO D.
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Re: Pursuit of Happiness [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2010, 06:00
I think B
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Re: Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2014, 00:34
BlueRobin wrote:
Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite different from always doing what one most strongly desires to do. This is because the rational pursuit of happiness must include consideration of long-term consequences, whereas our desires are usually focused on the short term. Moreover, desires are sometimes compulsions, and while ordinary desires result in at least momentary happiness when their goals are attained, compulsions strongly drive a person to pursue goals that offer no happiness even when reached

If all of the philosopher's statements are true, each of the following could be true EXCEPT:
(A) the majority of people do not have compulsions.
(B) Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.
(C) Most people do not pursue happiness rationally.
(D) Most people want more than their own personal happiness.
(E) All actions have long-term consequences.

OA will be posted later.

Why not E?

Passage does not state that All actions have long term consequences, only that happiness must include long term consequences.


For this one it is B.

You are ask what must not be true. So you need to find something that is not true and you are sure of that.

Answer B.
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Re: Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite [#permalink] New post 02 Jan 2014, 09:56
ordinary desires------- momentary happiness
compulsions DESIRE-------- no happiness

NONE OF THE ANSWER CHOICES CAN BE AS DIRECTLY CONTARDICTED FROM THE PASSAGE AS "B".


(B) Attaining the goal of any desire results in momentary happiness.
------
HENCE IMO "B"....
Re: Philosopher: The rational pursuit of happiness is quite   [#permalink] 02 Jan 2014, 09:56
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