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Please rate my AOI!

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Senior Manager
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Please rate my AOI! [#permalink] New post 21 May 2011, 20:43
Again, KUDOS to anyone who offers constructive, articulate criticism.

I should also mention that any critique will receive one back in kind.

Thanks!

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“In any enterprise, the process of making or doing something is ultimately more important than the final product.”

Discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the opinion expressed above. Support your point of view with reasons and/or examples from your own experience, observations, or reading.

AOI:

There are many people that believe the process is more important than the outcome or product. Others believe that the product or outcome is more important than the process. I would say this is heavily dependent on what the final goal is. Typically in the business world, results and outcomes are more heavily favored than the details of the process. Therefore, I disagree with the statement and believe that the final product usually outweighs with process of making or doing.

First, in our fast paced world today, the majority of people have a limited amount of free time to explore or reflect on the process. This tends to lead to an outcome focused lifestyle that favors final results. For example, a high level manager in a corporation probably has his or her attention split amongst many tasks. If a subordinate or colleague has reported a former issue has resolved itself, it would be rare to see reflection or tracing steps to success occur. This is not to say it should or shouldn't be done, it is just a result of such a limited amount of time and attention one can spend on "burning platform" issues. Another example outside of the business world may be a child who is waiting to be picked up from school by a parent or guardian. The child does not care if the mother, father or familiar caretaker picks them up and how many stop signs were seen on the way to school, the child cares about being picked up on time and to be able to move on to the next activity. Clearly, just for a simple lack of time, people generally are focused on the end result rather than the process.

Second, from a consumer's perspective, the ultimate quality/cost ratio of a consumed product or service usually trumps how the product was made or presented. This is seen on a day to day basis with food items purchased at the grocery store. Most consumers do not question all of the steps, checks, and regulations that a food item might have seen. It is rare to see a purchase made based on how the product was produced. More commonly, the consumer will either have a brand of preference, or do a quick quality/cost assessment before selection. It is only when there is a major issue such as a recall, that consumers learn about the process of manufacturing or agriculture. Even then, consumers look for binary answers such as: "do not purchase eggs from brand X" or some similar logic along those lines. Therefore, for those who are customers or receive a final product presented by another party, the final product is more important than the process of creation.

Third, unless the goal is to learn from the process, it typically is ignored. In this case, it can be argued that learning from the process is the final product. For example, artists may work in a different or creative manner to learn about how to create something unique. Here the self-exploratory nature of the artist's work is the final product or goal. Another example may be a sport fisherman, who just enjoys rigging lines, casting rods, and driving a boat around as an escape from daily routines or responsibilities. Obviously the fisherman cares more about the action rather than the outcome of how many fish were caught. Here, the process is also the act, which is also the final goal.

In summary, there are arguments that fall on both sides. However, I argue that the final solution is usually favored over the process on the whole. In instances where the process is favored, it is usually the main objective, and therefore the final product itself. Certainly in our busy world filled with agendas and people who compete with our attention, the luxury of stopping to reflect on the process of creation is lost. Therefore, I claim that on the whole, the final product is more important than the process to create it.
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Re: Please rate my AOI! [#permalink] New post 21 May 2011, 22:34
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I have been out of AWA, so forgive me if this is not spot on. I love the topic sentence - fantastic but one thing jumped out at the end - shouldn't you actually say whether you agree/disagree in the conclusion?
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Senior Manager
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Kudos [?]: 27 [0], given: 17

Re: Please rate my AOI! [#permalink] New post 21 May 2011, 23:44
humphy wrote:
Therefore, I claim that on the whole, the final product is more important than the process to create it.


Thanks for your comments. I guess I didn't actually say I agreed/disagreed. I think my last sentence above implies that I disagree with the statement.

To a machine/program grader, it may not have detected that I implied it. To a brain dead human grader, he/she might not pick it up.

I will be more careful to spell it out in the future! Thanks bb!
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Re: Please rate my AOI! [#permalink] New post 03 Jun 2011, 19:25
Hey all,

Full Debrief to anyone interested:
full-debrief-580-to-690-q48-v37-5month-retake-114597.html

haven't received officials AWA, but will update when I get it in a few days
Re: Please rate my AOI!   [#permalink] 03 Jun 2011, 19:25
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