Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 24 Nov 2014, 16:44

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Please rate my AWA

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 19 Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Please rate my AWA [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2014, 01:06
Hello,

Please help me by rating the essay below. Here is the prompt:

“In some countries, television and radio programs are carefully censored for offensive language and behavior. In
other countries, there is little or no censorship.”

In your view, to what extent should government or any other group be able to censor television or radio programs?
Explain, giving relevant reasons and/or examples to support your position.


----

The issue of media censorship by governments is an extremely complex one. The wide variety of approaches that various governments take to regulate television and radio programs shows that few governments agree exactly how to address this issue. Some censorship can help prevent antisocial behavior, but the dangers of excessive censorship are many. The best approach is a light touch: anything beyond minimal censorship should not be allowed.

One reason excessive censorship is undesirable is that it allows governments to suppress the voices of political opponents. This was the case in Nazi-ruled Germany up to and during World War II. The Nazi regime tightly controlled all media, preventing anything but official propaganda from being printed or transmitted, thereby silencing any opposition. Invariably, regimes that censor information claim they are only censoring offensive language or behavior; they do not admit they are silencing opposing views. Claims that policies merely target offensive behavior are often insincere and dangerous; allowing such claims gives bad governments cover to engage in unsavory and even illegal behavior.

Excessive censorship can also be used as a tool to aid in corporate malfeasance. For example, recently, it was revealed that some Chinese pharmaceutical companies bribed government officials to disallow television advertisements by competing drug manufacturers. Officially, the advertisements were not allowed because they offended bald people, the group targeted for treatment by the drug makers. However, it is easy to see that the real reason was the suppression of information dangerous to the bottom line of a powerful company. Such malfeasance would have been impossible with less strict rules regarding censorship.

However, there is merit to some small degree of television or radio censorship. Programs that are easily seen or heard by children, such as those aired during after-school hours, should be censored so as not to frighten or disturb young audiences, and so as not to encourage self-destructive or antisocial behavior. Children are prone to imitate behavior they see or hear; therefore, during the appropriate daytime hours, it should be strictly against the law to portray children smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, using drugs, or engaging in malicious violence. Other behavior may be disallowed depending on the cultural norms of the society in question. There is no one-size-fits-all solution to the issue of censorship.

Overall, censorship of television or radio is a complex issue that can only be addressed on a case-by-case basis. In general, though, minimal censorship is necessary to protect children from age-inappropriate material, while more strict measures leave the system open to abuse by governments or any other body able to influence media transmission. A light touch, therefore, is the best policy regarding censorship.

----


Many thanks, everyone!

-Cwarb
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 19 Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Re: Please rate my AWA [#permalink] New post 24 Jan 2014, 19:23
Anyone? Pretty please?
Re: Please rate my AWA   [#permalink] 24 Jan 2014, 19:23
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic Please Rate My AWA shalin1483 3 18 Jan 2014, 05:16
Experts publish their posts in the topic Please rate my AWA akashb106 3 27 Sep 2013, 22:12
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic Please rate my AWA akashb106 3 18 Sep 2013, 18:14
Experts publish their posts in the topic Please rate my AWA danzig 1 07 Sep 2013, 08:42
Experts publish their posts in the topic Please rate my AWA akijuneja 1 23 Aug 2013, 02:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Please rate my AWA

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.