Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 22 Jul 2014, 15:51

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

please rate my AWA, i am not native English speaker

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Sep 2012
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

please rate my AWA, i am not native English speaker [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2012, 00:59
The following appeared in an editorial from a newspaper serving the town of Saluda:
“The Saluda Consolidated High School offers more than 200 different courses from which its students can choose. A much smaller private school down the street offers a basic curriculum of only 80 different courses, but it consistently sends a higher proportion of its graduating seniors on to college than Consolidated does. By eliminating at least half of the courses offered there and focusing on a basic curriculum, we could improve student performance at Consolidated and also save many tax dollars.”
Discuss how well reasoned . . . etc.
-------------------------------------------------------------

In this argument the author concludes that, in order to improve student performance at Consolidated and, at the same time, save some tax dollars, the Saluda Consolidated High school should decrease the number of courses from which its students can choose. The author cites a smaller private school as example to prove this. This smaller private school offers only 80 different courses while the Saluda Consolidated High School offers more than 200 different course. However, the private school keeps sending a higher proportion of its graduating students who went to college. Even though the conclusion seems appealing at first glance, the author’s claim suffers from several critical flaws.

The author unfairly assumes that the high proportion of graduating seniors on to college course was determined solely by the number of courses. In fact, this is rarely the case. The proportion of graduating seniors who went to college could be affected by many factors, such the quality of teaching, the teaching facilities in the school, etc. Perhaps the hard working of the students in the smaller private school leads to the high proportion of students who finally went to college. Without accounting for these potential factors, the author concludes too hastily ...is the best way to achieve goals.

The evidence the author provides is insufficient to support the conclusion drawn from it. One example is logically not enough to establish a general conclusion, unless it can be shown that the smaller private school is able to represent all schools. It is possible that the small school is totally different from the Saluda Consolidated High School, thus the success would not happen again on the Saluda Consolidated High School.

Another problem seriously weakens the logic of the argument is that the author assumes that the number of the graduating seniors who went to the college is the only criteria in determining the students’ performance. It is absolutely possible that a student who did not went to college, maybe because he or her cannot afford the tuition, is a good student at high school. Without more concrete information, the author’s assumption is questionable.

In conclusion, the argument is flawed for the above-mentioned reasons and is therefore unconvincing. To strengthen the conclusion, the author should provide concrete evidence that the two schools are analogous in all aspects. Furthermore, the author also should show evidence that the number of students who went to college is the only criteria in determine the students’ performance. Without those evidences, the argument remains unsubstantiated and open to debate.
-----------------------------------------

THX. I am not native and i will take GMAT in 5 days. need help!!
Kaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesKnewton GMAT Discount CodesGMAT Pill GMAT Discount Codes
please rate my AWA, i am not native English speaker   [#permalink] 13 Sep 2012, 00:59
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Please, Rate my essay. I am not native. ooooa 1 16 Feb 2013, 09:41
Please rate my AWA - GMAT a week away and I am lost! sbnr 1 21 Oct 2010, 06:18
I am a native English speaker, and I do extremely well on uphillclimb 3 03 Oct 2007, 07:51
SC is kicking my butt. I am a native English speaker and jamesrwrightiii 0 22 Jul 2006, 14:55
For native speakers of English bqminh1983 0 16 Apr 2006, 10:28
Display posts from previous: Sort by

please rate my AWA, i am not native English speaker

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.