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Police published a wanted poster for a criminal fugitive in

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Police published a wanted poster for a criminal fugitive in [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 10:00
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13. Police published a wanted poster for a criminal fugitive in a medical journal, because the fugitive was known to have a certain acute noninfectious skin problem that would eventually require a visit to a doctor. The poster asked for information about the whereabouts of the fugitive. A physicians responding to the posters request for information would not violate medical ethics, since physicians are already subject to requirements to report gunshot wounds to police and certain infectious diseases to health authorities. These exceptions to confidentiality are clearly ethical.

Which one of the following principles, while remaining compatible with the requirements cited above, supports the view that a physician┬б┬пs responding to the request would violate medical ethics?

(A) Since a physician acts both as a professional person and as a citizen, it is not ethical for a physician to conceal information about patients from duly constituted law enforcement agencies that have proper jurisdiction.

(B) Since a patient comes to a physician with the expectation that the patient┬б┬пs visit and medical condition will remain confidential, it is not ethical for a physician to share this information with anyone except personnel within the physicians office.

(C) Since the primary concern of medicine if individual and public health, it is not ethical for a physician, except in the case of gunshot wounds, to reduce patients willingness to come for treatment by a policy of disclosing their identities to law-enforcement agencies.

(D) Except as required by the medical treatment of the patient, physicians cannot ethically disclose to others information about a patient┬б┬пs identity or medical condition without the patients consent.

(E) Except to other medical personnel working to preserve or restore the health of a patient or of other persons, physicians cannot ethically disclose information about the identity of patients or their medical condition.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 10:08
B ??
I don't see much difference in E also.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 10:25
B

it talks of patient's expectations..
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 10:33
That's pretty tough.

You have the public health issue to explain mandatory infectious disease disclosure, but the public health argument is much weaker when it comes to gunshots. I suppose the best answer would explain why the skin condition is analogous to the gunshot wound with regard to required disclosure.

A. is an argument for disclosure being ethical.
B. is pretty strong-- making the case that the right to privacy stems from the expectation of privacy.
C. States that the gunshot wound is an exception to the nondisclosure policy, and implies that by disclosing other disorders, public health will be damaged, since people will be reluctant to see their doctors.
D. completely ignores gunshot wounds and communicable diseases, and makes a broad statement against any kind of disclosure, without explaining the ethics of the situation.
E. is almost identical to B in that it exempts information-sharing with other medical professionals, but unlike B it gives no reason for the policy.

I like B and C, but I think C wins by a nose (and I wish to be contrary).
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 10:42
stoolfi wrote:
That's pretty tough.

You have the public health issue to explain mandatory infectious disease disclosure, but the public health argument is much weaker when it comes to gunshots. I suppose the best answer would explain why the skin condition is analogous to the gunshot wound with regard to required disclosure.

A. is an argument for disclosure being ethical.
B. is pretty strong-- making the case that the right to privacy stems from the expectation of privacy.
C. States that the gunshot wound is an exception to the nondisclosure policy, and implies that by disclosing other disorders, public health will be damaged, since people will be reluctant to see their doctors.
D. completely ignores gunshot wounds and communicable diseases, and makes a broad statement against any kind of disclosure, without explaining the ethics of the situation.
E. is almost identical to B in that it exempts information-sharing with other medical professionals, but unlike B it gives no reason for the policy.

I like B and C, but I think C wins by a nose (and I wish to be contrary).


C holds only when the patient knows that the hospital is going to disclose his identity. And if the patient is coming to the hospital even after knowing that, then nothing is unethical at hospital's part.

weird ..haan :twisted:
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 11:11
C is the only one which comes close.

All other options do not voilate the ethics
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2004, 11:48
C is the corect answer.
C will violate the ethics because the fugitive has noninfectious disease. This skin disease does not cause concern for public health.
  [#permalink] 06 Jan 2004, 11:48
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