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Political advocacy groups have begun to use information

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Manager
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Joined: 07 Dec 2011
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Concentration: International Business, Strategy
GMAT Date: 07-30-2012
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Political advocacy groups have begun to use information [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2012, 09:28
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  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

48% (01:57) correct 52% (01:47) wrong based on 52 sessions
Political advocacy groups have begun to use information services to disseminate information that is then accessed by the public via personal computer. Since many groups are thus able to bypass traditional news sources, whose reporting is selective, and to present their political views directly to the public, information services present a more balanced picture of the complexities of political issues than any traditional news source presents.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?
A. Information services are accessible to enough people to ensure that political advocacy groups can use these services to reach as large a percentage of the public as they could through traditional news sources.
B. People could get a thorough understanding of a particular political issue by sorting through information provided by several traditional news sources, each with differing editorial biases.
C. Information on political issues disseminated through information services does not come almost entirely from advocacy groups that share a single bias.
D. Traditional news sources seldom report the views of political advocacy groups accurately.
E. Most people who get information on political issues from newspapers and other traditional news sources can readily identify the editorial biases of those sources.
Quote:
need help with the argument. could not understand what it is implying!
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Political advocacy groups [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2012, 21:38
maybeam wrote:
Political advocacy groups have begun to use information services to disseminate information that is then accessed by the public via personal computer. Since many groups are thus able to bypass traditional news sources, whose reporting is selective, and to present their political views directly to the public, information services present a more balanced picture of the complexities of political issues than any traditional news source presents.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?
A. Information services are accessible to enough people to ensure that political advocacy groups can use these services to reach as large a percentage of the public as they could through traditional news sources.
B. People could get a thorough understanding of a particular political issue by sorting through information provided by several traditional news sources, each with differing editorial biases.
C. Information on political issues disseminated through information services does not come almost entirely from advocacy groups that share a single bias.
D. Traditional news sources seldom report the views of political advocacy groups accurately.
E. Most people who get information on political issues from newspapers and other traditional news sources can readily identify the editorial biases of those sources.
Quote:
need help with the argument. could not understand what it is implying!

Hi

Good Q...
According to me (C) is correct because if information on political issues disseminated through information services WERE almost entirely from advocacy groups that share a single bias, then you COULD NOT claim that information services present a more balanced picture of political issues than traditional news sources
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Re: Political advocacy groups [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2012, 02:39
Passage is making an argument that
"information services present a more balanced picture of the complexities of political issues than any traditional news source presents"

This claim will be possible only when we believe that traditional news source doesnt present a balanced picture. My analogy follows as

A. Information services are accessible to enough people to ensure that political advocacy groups can use these services to reach as large a percentage of the public as they could through traditional news sources. Passage doesnt argue over the reach of information services
B. People could get a thorough understanding of a particular political issue by sorting through information provided by several traditional news sources, each with differing editorial biases. This is against the argument and it still relies on traditional sources only
C. Information on political issues disseminated through information services does not come almost entirely from advocacy groups that share a single bias. This might be true but doesnt provide a base for the argument which says " a balanced picture will be provided by information services"
D. Traditional news sources seldom report the views of political advocacy groups accurately. Correct
E. Most people who get information on political issues from newspapers and other traditional news sources can readily identify the editorial biases of those sources.Argument doesnt say whether people can identify the bias or not
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Re: Political advocacy groups [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2012, 05:53
Political advocacy groups have begun to use information services to disseminate information that is then accessed by the public via personal computer. Since many groups are thus able to bypass traditional news sources, whose reporting is selective, and to present their political views directly to the public, information services present a more balanced picture of the complexities of political issues than any traditional news source presents.
Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

Firstly we need to understand the argument.
Evidence:- It says that the political advocacy groups have started using info services to spread info because traditional sources reporting is selective,
Conclusion:- Information system presents a balanced picture of political issues.

The green part justifies the use of info services by the political advocacy groups.
The point of this argument is that there should not be info from one source. There we get our assumption for using info services.

A. Information services are accessible to enough people to ensure that political advocacy groups can use these services to reach as large a percentage of the public as they could through traditional news sources. irrelevant cause percentage
B. People could get a thorough understanding of a particular political issue by sorting through information provided by several traditional news sources, each with differing editorial biases.understanding of political issue? irrelevant
C. Information on political issues disseminated through information services does not come almost entirely from advocacy groups that share a single bias. Correct
D. Traditional news sources seldom report the views of political advocacy groups accurately.the groups were not having a prob wid the accuracy of traditional sources but that they were selective
E. Most people who get information on political issues from newspapers and other traditional news sources can readily identify the editorial biases of those sources.irrelevant
Re: Political advocacy groups   [#permalink] 29 Jul 2012, 05:53
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