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Political opinion and analysis outside the mainstream rarely

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Political opinion and analysis outside the mainstream rarely [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 11:28
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

100% (02:08) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
Political opinion and analysis outside the mainstream rarely are found on television talk shows, and it might be thought that this state of affairs is a product of the political agenda of the television stations themselves. In fact, television stations are driven by the same economic forces as sellers of more tangible goods. Because they must attempt to capture the largest possible share of the television audience for their shows, they air only those shows that will appeal to large numbers of people. As a result, political opinions and analyses aired on television talk shows are typically bland and innocuous.
31. An assumption made in the explanation offered by the author of the passage is that
(A) most television viewers cannot agree on which elements of a particular opinion or analysis are most disturbing.
(B) there are television viewers who might refuse to watch television talk shows that they knew would be controversial and disturbing.
(C) each television viewer holds some opinion that is outside the political mainstream, but those opinions are not the same for everyone.
(D) there are television shows on which economic forces have an even greater impact than they do on television talk shows.
(E) the television talk shows of different stations resemble one another in most respects
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 12:28
No guys, try again. It's not so obvious
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 12:43
Political opinions and analysis outside the mainstream are found on tv talk shows. But still do...

So I'll go with D this time :arh
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 12:44
:lol: I think all the answers will be used up before we get down to the right one
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Re: CR TV shows [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 12:45
well, C it is.
Premise 1. each television viewer holds some opinion that is outside the political mainstream
Premise 2. tv stations must attempt to capture the largest possible share of the television audience for their shows
=> Political opinion and analysis outside the mainstream rarely are found on television talk shows
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 12:51
Any other ideas? :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 13:05
Marat2005 wrote:
well, C it is.
Premise 1. each television viewer holds some opinion that is outside the political mainstream
Premise 2. tv stations must attempt to capture the largest possible share of the television audience for their shows
=> Political opinion and analysis outside the mainstream rarely are found on television talk shows

i disavow this post. careless mistake.
i just wonder how different posts appear and disappear on this forum. ok. answer was disappeared a couple of minutes sooner, Paul )))
between, where have you got this question? kaplan or gmat+?
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 13:16
boksana wrote:
It's from private source

k. below my private sources

quoting:
"First of all, and this is a very, very important concept or "trick" for both CR and RC, most is often incorrect--most by definition means more than 50%, and to use this word, we would need to have information about that specific percentage, which we most certainly do not in this CR.
Second, (A) talks about whether television viewers are able to agree on which parts of something are disturbing, which is completely off-topic here.

Let me simplify the argument for you:
There are political talk shows on TV. TV stations make money by attracting large audiences to watch their shows. Therefore, these talk shows are bland and innocuous (i.e., not offensive).

To logically reach this conclusion would HAVE TO add the following premise in red:
There are political talk shows on TV. TV stations make money by attracting large audiences to watch their shows. A significant number of people in the potential audience prefer bland and innocuous (i.e., not offensive) television shows to provocative TV shows. Therefore, these talk shows are bland and innocuous.

In other words, we need to address what people like to determine what to air."

B
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 13:26
Yes, the answer is B. But it was not obvious to me :(
Thank for clarifying :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2004, 13:28
http://www.gmatclub.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=5382
I posted it but decided to let more people try it out and not mess around with Boksana's question :) This is an LSAT question
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  [#permalink] 06 Jul 2004, 13:28
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