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Political satire typically seizes on a public official s

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Political satire typically seizes on a public official s [#permalink] New post 04 May 2012, 14:03
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86% (01:56) correct 14% (01:10) wrong based on 50 sessions
sravanth wrote:
Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them.
A. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them
B. Political satire seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles and flaws or exaggerates them
C. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws thereby exaggerating it
D. Political satire tends to typically seize on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerate them
E. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and is exaggerating them


Hi, there! I'm happy to help with this! :-)

First, let's look at the split in the first verb . . .
(A) ...satire typically seizes...
(B) ...satire seizes typically...
(C) ...satire typically seizes...
(D) ...satire tends to typically seize...
(E) ...satire typically seizes...

Answers (A) & (C) & (E) are identical in this split, and all are correct with respect to this point. Answer (B) changes the meaning of the sentence ---- whereas (A) & (C) & (E) talk about what political satire typically does --- it typically seizes and exaggerates ---- (B) changes the focus to *what* political satire seizes --- it seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles or flaws, but sometimes it seizes other things? This meaning makes no sense, so (B) is out. (D) is a wordy redundant monstrosity that should be taken out back and shot --- (D) is out.

The two actions --- seizing and exaggerating --- should be in parallel
(A) ...seizes ....and exaggerates them.
(C) ...seizes ....thereby exaggerating it.
(E) ...seizes ....and is exaggerating them.
(A) has correct parallel structure. (E) just botches the parallel structure, and is grammatically incorrect. (C) takes an alternate tack, making the second half of the sentence a dependent clause, and this could work, but the problem is the singular pronoun "it" --- the antecedent ("foibles or flaws") is plural. Thus, both (C) and (E) are out.

That leaves (A), the only choice completely free of grammatical mistake.

Does that make sense? Let me know if you have any more questions.

Mike :)
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Gramatical Construction [#permalink] New post 05 May 2012, 23:29
sravanth wrote:
Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them.
A. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them
B. Political satire seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles and flaws or exaggerates them
C. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws thereby exaggerating it
D. Political satire tends to typically seize on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerate them
E. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and is exaggerating them


A. Political satire[singular] typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them

B- incorrect construction
C- awkward. it doesnt agree with plural flaws and foilbles
D - exaggerate does not agree with singular subject political satire
E- awkward. wrong tense
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Re: Political satire typically seizes on a public official s [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2013, 10:52
As for D, is it not correct structure to use "X tends to Y and Z" (as D does in fact)? I mean yes A is clear, but I do not see how D is wrong. I understand that satire should be singular, but I felt that using the structure above was appropriate and exaggerate refers to " to typically seize and..."...what would you say?

Thanks for help.
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Re: Political satire typically seizes on a public official s [#permalink] New post 23 Apr 2013, 22:52
obs23 wrote:
As for D, is it not correct structure to use "X tends to Y and Z" (as D does in fact)? I mean yes A is clear, but I do not see how D is wrong. I understand that satire should be singular, but I felt that using the structure above was appropriate and exaggerate refers to " to typically seize and..."...what would you say?

Thanks for help.


Hi obs23
D is wrong because of wrong parallelism. The correct structure is: X tends to Y and to Z.
If you eliminate "to", you're comparing "tends" with "exaggerate". Hence, you're wrong one more time because "exaggerate" go with plural, but subject here is singular.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Political satire typically seizes on a public official s   [#permalink] 23 Apr 2013, 22:52
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