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Political satire typically seizes on a public official s

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Political satire typically seizes on a public official s [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2012, 21:58
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82% (01:00) correct 18% (00:57) wrong based on 62 sessions
Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them

A. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them
B. Political satire seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles and flaws or exaggerates them
C. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws thereby exaggerating it
D. Political satire tends to typically seize on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerate them
E. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and is exaggerating them
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by getgyan on 05 Oct 2012, 03:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 01:09
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I would go with A. seizes and exxagerates are parallel. Cant find anything wrong with it
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 01:18
ankushgrover wrote:
I would go with A. seizes and exxagerates are parallel. Cant find anything wrong with it


Siezes and exaggerates are parallel in B too..
the fight is between siezes typically...OR ... typically siezes...!!
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 03:14
aditi1903 wrote:
Siezes and exaggerates are parallel in B too..
the fight is between siezes typically...OR ... typically siezes...!!


Option B : Political satire seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles and flaws or exaggerates them - What about the placement of "and" and "or"?

:-D
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 03:17
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 03:28
aditi1903 wrote:
Siezes and exaggerates are parallel in B too..
the fight is between siezes typically...OR ... typically siezes...!!


souvik101990 wrote:
I think "and" is necessary
Political satires first seizes and then exaggerates. "or" cannot serve the same function now can it!


Hi Aditi

As stated by Souvik, the position of "and" and "or" has been compromised, thus making the option incorrect. Any thoughts?

OA is A. Please let us know why you think A is wrong?

:-D
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 03:34
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aditi1903 wrote:
ankushgrover wrote:
I would go with A. seizes and exxagerates are parallel. Cant find anything wrong with it


Siezes and exaggerates are parallel in B too..
the fight is between siezes typically...OR ... typically siezes...!!


Quote:
Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them

A. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them
B. Political satire seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles and flaws or exaggerates them
C. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws thereby exaggerating it
D. Political satire tends to typically seize on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerate them
E. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and is exaggerating them


Hey aditi,
You are right that "typically" plays a major role in the sentences. However I cannot emphasize it enough that wrong answers in gmatland, almost every time, have more than one wrong stuff in them.
So "typically"/"and/or" both could work for you depending upon which you are more confident about.
(Similar multiple mistakes can be observed in pronouns/modifiers etc)
If you look a bit objectively, this sentence ideally wants to say "typically seizes"
Consider the following analogy
Bullies typically prey on weak boys
Bullies prey typically on weak boys

The first sentence suggests a common thing among bullies while the second sentence emphasizes the common traits of preying habits of bullies.
Am I being clear?
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 03:41
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 05:39
i was a bit confused between the meaning of the sentence..
siezes and exxagerates is also correct
siezes or exaggarates is also correct (iff u consider only the meaning...)

but then the example given with regard to TYPICALLY solves the problem..
Now i would go with A

Thanks for the gyan !!! :)
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2012, 07:27
aditi1903 wrote:
i was a bit confused between the meaning of the sentence..
siezes and exxagerates is also correct
siezes or exaggarates is also correct (iff u consider only the meaning...)

but then the example given with regard to TYPICALLY solves the problem..
Now i would go with A

Thanks for the gyan !!! :)


My take how i eliminated an option because there are more than one rules tested so you can go by one way or the other whichever clicks u
i am posting my way
correct me guys if i am wrong...?

'Political satire' is singular so verb should be singular therefore eliminated 'D'

Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them

A. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerates them <== adverb 'typically'modifies verb 'seizes' so i went with A
B. Political satire seizes typically on a public official‘s foibles and flaws or exaggerates them
C. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws thereby exaggerating it
D. Political satire tends to typically seize on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and exaggerate them
E. Political satire typically seizes on a public official‘s foibles or flaws and is exaggerating them
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2012, 02:16
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One point to note here is the adverbs tend to modify those that are following after them. In this case, that is why -typically seizes – captures the proper context. But, -seizes typically - tends to focus on the public official’s foibles or flaws, which is improper.
But more importantly, the important clue here is that the satire should first catch the foibles and flaw, and then only it can exaggerate them. , So the- and exaggerates - becomes very essential to the meaning, while or exaggerates - cannot portray that eventuality. Going by this tenet, A is the clear winner. Others you may see are horribly ungrammatical
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Re: Political satire typically seizes [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2012, 06:40
thanks a lot guys!!!
all clear now :)
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Re: Political satire typically seizes on a public official s [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2013, 06:13
What is the subject for the word exaggerate is it
political sattire or public official‘s foibles or flaws
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Re: Political satire typically seizes on a public official s [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2013, 06:47
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No use both to decide which one; Political satire exaggerates (not exaggerate as you have stated; to find some such thing on a wrong choice will land us off-tack.) This is perfectly ok. Now on to the second choice:
official‘s foibles or flaws exaggerate them: If foibles and flaws become the subject, what is the pronoun them referring to? There is no other plural noun in the clause. So this cannot be correct.
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Re: Political satire typically seizes on a public official s   [#permalink] 30 Apr 2013, 06:47
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