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Poor grades from master's taught in different language

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Joined: 28 Nov 2012
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Poor grades from master's taught in different language [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2012, 21:05
I'm from the US where I graduated with a 3.7 gpa in accounting from a state school. I am currently studying at a top university in China for a masters in Chinese accounting, but as the only foreigner (white) I'm struggling with the language gap since I only had two years of language training to prepare.

I'm on a full scholarship and they only allowed a maximum of two years of language classes. They also wouldn't let me change my major once I realized I was over my head.

All classes, tests, and papers are in Chinese, so my gpa is at a very low 2.0. I'm the only westerner to complete this program and possibly the only one in China. Yet, I'm afraid this low gpa will hurt my chances of a top 20 MBA program. Should I forget about applying or is there any way not to mention my Chinese gpa? I heard some of the top European companies don't ask for graduate degree grades.

I've worked on the side as an English teacher for the first year and now at an investment firm for my second year. Should I not even mention my master's degree?
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Re: Poor grades from master's taught in different language [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2012, 02:35
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Hmmm tough question.
My advice though: always be straightforward with the Adcom. Be a hero. show them that you only got a 2.0, but tell your story. tell that you are the only westerner to have this degree, it will likely count for more than you think. As long as you have good undergrad grades it shouldn't really hurt you because they will see that you are a clever fellow (get great GMAT to back this up, and you will have no worries at all)
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Poor grades from master's taught in different language

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