Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 25 Jul 2014, 10:31

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

PS-wire length segments

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 130
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
PS-wire length segments [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2004, 22:22
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
Could you tell me how you would go about solving this problem?

A wire is cut into three equal parts. The resulting segments are then cut into 4, 6, and 8 equal parts respectively. If each of the resulting segments has an integer length, what is the miniumum length of the wire?
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2004
Posts: 698
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 14 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 05:39
I would take the LCM of 4,6,8. It is 24. So each of the three pieces is 24 units, so actual length will be 24*3 = 72 units.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 25 Dec 2003
Posts: 360
Location: India
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 07:21
The easiest way is to subsitute the values. We know that the segments have integer values. (1, 2, 3, 4....)

Let us start with the minimum.

segments : 4---6---8

Let us take 1 as the integer of the first segment (4 parts). Hence one part is 0.25. But this will not give an integer value for the second segment (6 parts). Hence integer 1 is out.

Take interger 2 for the 1st segment.

Then we have the lengths are 2---3---4. Making the total lenght of the wire as 9.

This is the easiest way to solve. I hope this helped.
:)
_________________

Giving another SHOT

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 130
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 08:31
carsen,

The OA is not 9.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Posts: 6
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 11:43
let lenght of wire be x.

divided into three equal parts gives x/3

each of them is further divided into equal parts as follows

x/12 , x/18 , x/24. for all these to be intergers, we need the LCM which is 144.
is that the right answer?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 May 2004
Posts: 5
Location: Canada.
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 18:40
If the wire is cut in 3 equal parts , then the minimum length is some multiple of 3.
Then each one of that length is cut into 4,6 and 8 equal parts. So we've to find the minimum common multiple of 4,6 and 8 which is 24.

So the minimum length would be 24 * 3 = 72.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 25 Dec 2003
Posts: 360
Location: India
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 22:38
IGNORE my last solution. I misread the question.

Let 'L' be the total lenght of the wire. Upon segmenting as per the requirement, each segment has

1st wire peice - L/12
2nd wire peice - L/18
3rd wire piece - L/24

The LCM for these values is 72. This is the minimum value.

To go about solving these... draw a line lenght "L". cut in to 3 peices, each of L/3. And we know these each L/3 shud be cut in to 4, 6, and 8 parts. Hence..

L/3 x 4= L/12
L/3 x 6 = L/18
L/3 x 8 = L/24.

Calculate the LCM. In this case, 72. Hence 72 is the answer. Pardon me for misunderstanding the question, earlier.

Regards
_________________

Giving another SHOT

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Oct 2004
Posts: 130
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 7 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Dec 2004, 22:47
Thanks for the help! The OA is 72.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Dec 2009
Posts: 27
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 2

Re: PS-wire length segments [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2009, 20:41
Can someone please explain to me why we need to take the LCM in this case?
And why is it important to find multiple of 3 if the wire was further cut into pieces?

I thought with pieces cut into 4,6,8 I can simply add them and since it has to be integer length, 4 + 6 + 8 = 18 would be the minimum length.

Thanks
Re: PS-wire length segments   [#permalink] 25 Dec 2009, 20:41
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
What is the length of segment BC Countdown 0 13 Aug 2013, 02:34
8 Experts publish their posts in the topic What is the length of segment BC? alexBLR 27 14 Feb 2010, 10:33
In ΔJKL shown above, what is the length of segment JL xang 5 05 Aug 2008, 18:39
The length of a line segment is 2 inches. What's the area of ritula 4 27 Jun 2008, 03:38
13 Experts publish their posts in the topic What is the length of segment BC? GMAT TIGER 38 08 May 2008, 20:28
Display posts from previous: Sort by

PS-wire length segments

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.