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Q17)Lecture: Given our current state of knowledge and

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Q17)Lecture: Given our current state of knowledge and [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 08:38
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A
B
C
D
E

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75% (02:23) correct 25% (00:00) wrong based on 5 sessions
Q17)Lecture: Given our current state of knowledge and technology, we can say that the generalization that the entropy of a closed system cannot decrease for any spontaneous process has not been falsified by any of our tests of that generalization. So we conclude it to be true universally. Yet, it must be admitted that this generalization has not been conclusively verified, in the sense that it has not been tested in every corner of the universe, under every feasible condition. Nevertheless, this generalization is correctly regarded as a scientific law; indeed, it is referred to as the Second Law of Thermodynamics.
Which one of the following principles, if valid, most justifies the lecturer’s classification of the generalization described above?
(A) Whatever is a scientific law has not been falsified.
(B) If a generalization is confirmed only under a few circumstances, it should not be considered a scientific law.
(C) Whatever is true universally will eventually be confirmed to the extent current science allows.
(D) If a generalization is confirmed to the extent current science allows, then it is considered a scientific law.
(E) Whatever is regarded as a scientific law will eventually be conclusively verified.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 09:18
answer is D
If a generalization is confirmed to the extent current science allows, then it is considered a scientific law.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 12:57
17. A
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 19:50
(A) Whatever is a scientific law has not been falsified.>> This statements seems too generic. The passage specifies a constraint that the scientific law has not been falsified by any of the tests that technology allows.
(B) If a generalization is confirmed only under a few circumstances, it should not be considered a scientific law.
>> This does not have negative impact on the conclusion. At the same time not a strong candidate.(C) Whatever is true universally will eventually be confirmed to the extent current science allows.
>> Passage does not mention that everything in universe that is true is/will be confirmed ...
(D) If a generalization is confirmed to the extent current science allows, then it is considered a scientific law.
>> Yes. This is the correct justification for the conclusion. This also considers the constraint that 'to the extent current science allows..'.
(E) Whatever is regarded as a scientific law will eventually be conclusively verified.
>> Contradicts the statement in passage.

Ans D.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2010, 02:58
I go with D.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2010, 22:03
D seems most apprpriate
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2010, 05:57
even i will go with D

OA :?:
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 04 May 2010, 02:00
I got confused between 'A' and 'D'. finally picked 'A'. Can someone explain why 'A' is not correct??

'D' is reads fine but the writer shows an exception in the argument, entropy which is not universally tested and proved current science allows but is still scientific law. Considering this doesn't 'A' sound appropriate definition of generalization?
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 28 May 2010, 21:22
I do not know how to approach this question.
Any feedback and explanation of OA would be greatly appreciated.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 28 May 2010, 23:17
It's D.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2010, 02:37
D is the most appealing answer.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 02 Jun 2010, 17:31
1 more vote for D.
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 18:19
Can you confirm OA? Thanks!
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Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2 [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 19:40
nilesh376 wrote:
I got confused between 'A' and 'D'. finally picked 'A'. Can someone explain why 'A' is not correct??


The reason that A is not correct is because the passage tells us that any spontaneous process that has not been falsified by any of our tests, can be called a scientific law, despite not being verified under any possible condition. The passage does not tell us that all scientific laws have not been falsified. It only gives us the generality that anything that not falsified by experimentation can be a scientific law. It does not say that all scientific laws have not been falsified.

This is an example of categorical logic. Consider the easier to understand example;

All cats are mammals. - From the statement we cannot deduce that all mammals are cats. We can only say that there are things that are cats and things that are mammals and that all cats belong to the class of things we call mammals. This statement does not tell us that all mammals are cats.

To make it relevant to the passage;

All non-falsified generalization are scientific law. - From this we can conclude that there are things that are non-falsified generalizations and things that are scientific law and that all things that are non-falsified generalizations belong to the category of things that are scientific law. We cannot conclude from this that all things that are scientific law are non-falsified generalizations.

I hope you find this helpful.

Thanks,

Jared
Re: LSAT/TEST Oct 2001/Q2   [#permalink] 06 Jun 2010, 19:40
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Q17)Lecture: Given our current state of knowledge and

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