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Questions with solution, Still Not convinced

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Joined: 17 Apr 2013
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Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Leadership
Schools: HBS '16
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Questions with solution, Still Not convinced [#permalink] New post 18 Aug 2013, 13:09
A recent study, published by the California Bureau of Employment, found that people who sent in resumes with “ethnic-sounding” names had a much more difficult time getting called back from employers as people who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names.



(A) employers as people who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names.

(B) employers as those who did send in resumes showing similar qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.

(C) employers than those who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names.

(D) employers than those who did send in resumes showing similar qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.

(E) employers than people did who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.

Solution: E
Explanation: This problem requires that you properly frame the comparison: “people who sent in resumes with these characteristics had a more difficult time getting called back than people did who had resumes with these characteristics.”
In (A) and (B) the “as” is incorrect: you say “more than” not “more as”.
In (C), you need a “with” after the “but”: without it, the sentence means that the resume showed qualifications AND white names, clearly nonsensical.
For (D), the “did” is in the wrong place: it seems to indicate that only those who decided to send in resumes were affected. The “did” needs to be before or after people, not after the who. Answer is (E).


Primarily I am still not comfortable with explanations for C and D.

E is the worst answer and it is the correct Choice here, Why? "employers than people did who sent in resumes " seems to be very awkward here.
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Re: Questions with solution, Still Not convinced [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2013, 15:44
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honchos wrote:
A recent study, published by the California Bureau of Employment, found that people who sent in resumes with “ethnic-sounding” names had a much more difficult time getting called back from employers as people who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names.
(A) employers as people who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names.
(B) employers as those who did send in resumes showing similar qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.
(C) employers than those who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names.
(D) employers than those who did send in resumes showing similar qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.
(E) employers than people did who sent in resumes showing similar qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.

Dear honchos,
I'm happy to help with this. :-)

First of all, this question, a GMAT SC question, really show be posted in the Verbal/SC forum, not in the Ask GMAT Experts forum. We GMAT experts answer questions in all forums, and this one really is for those questions that do not fit into another category.

Second, when you post a SC question, please underline the section that is underlined in the question, as I have done above. This makes it much easier for the reader to understand.

I notice you attribute no source. The quality of GMAT SC varies widely with source. This one strikes me as a little questionable.

Clearly, we are doing a comparison, so it should "more difficult.... than", not "more difficult.... as", so clearly (A) & (B) are out.

The reason for rejecting (D) is valid. The "people" after the word "than" are a subject parallel to the "people who sent" subject earlier in the sentence. This needs a verb ---- either "than people did who ..." or "that did people who ..." Dropping this verb is casual --- it would pass in colloquial English, but it's a bit too informal for the GMAT. Choice (D) illogically puts the "did" after "who" --- this creates emphasis on ones who sent a resume, as opposed to ones who didn't, but that's not the emphasis the sentence is discussing. Because of both casualness and the illogical implication, (D) is atrocious and wrong.

I agree, though, that (C) is quite debatable. I get that they want to argue that "with “white-sounding” names" should be parallel with "with “ethnic-sounding” names", but the construction is totally different!! In one case, the people "sent in resumes with “ethnic-sounding” names", but in the other case, we have "resumes showing similar qualifications but “white-sounding” names". That latter construction is 100% grammatically correct on its own, and because the rest of the sentence doesn't follow the same construction, it's hard to make the argument that these two particular pieces need to be in parallel.

While (E) is grammatically correct, I would argue that (C) is also grammatically correct. I would recommend that you take this as an indication to question the quality of the source from which you took the question.

Mike :-)
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Re: Questions with solution, Still Not convinced   [#permalink] 19 Aug 2013, 15:44
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