Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 02 Oct 2014, 00:34

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

RC - Tone of verbiage. Mood of Author.

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

RC - Tone of verbiage. Mood of Author. [#permalink] New post 26 May 2005, 04:29
Passage Excerpt.....

Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) movement as seeking to debunk orthodox legal theory by exposing its contradictions. However, Meyerson argues that CLS proponents tend to see contradictions where none exist, and that CLS overrrates the threat that conflict poses to orthodox legal theory.

According to Meyerson, CLS proponents hold that the existence of conflicting values in the law implies the absence of any uniquely right solution to legal cases. CLS argues that these conflicting values generate equally plausible but opposing answers to any given legal question, and, consequently, that the choice between the conflicting answers must necessarily be arbitraty or irrational. Meyerson denies that the existence of conflicting values makes a case iresolvable, and asserts taht at least some such cases can be resolved by ranking the conflicting values. For example, ........

In addition, says Meyerson, even when the two solutions are equally compelling, it does not follow that the choice between them must be irrational. ..........


Last, Meyerson takes issues with the CLS charge that legal formalism......

The rest of the passage follows the same "tone".

Question:

The author's primary purpose in the passage is to

1) Describe a challenge to a school of thought
2) Refute claims made by various scholars

I think "refute claims" is an extreme version of "describe a challenge", No? Also based on the "tone" of the passage what do you think is more appropriate?
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 14 Jul 2004
Posts: 700
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 26 May 2005, 04:35
Sorry guys i posted it in the wrong forum. Dont have move/delete privs. I moved it to the correct forum
  [#permalink] 26 May 2005, 04:35
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic Essay Tone stupandaus 7 01 Aug 2010, 16:27
Author's tone ankithakhu 0 22 Jul 2010, 05:29
1 RC: Federal Authorities, local witnesses hbs2012 13 13 Oct 2008, 05:07
RC: author’s attitude toward something in the passage gmatmilitary 1 03 Jul 2007, 12:20
Subjunctive Mood saurabhmalpani 9 15 Dec 2004, 20:22
Display posts from previous: Sort by

RC - Tone of verbiage. Mood of Author.

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: m3equals333, TGC



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.