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Recent estimates predict that between 1982 and 1995 the

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Recent estimates predict that between 1982 and 1995 the [#permalink] New post 02 Nov 2005, 13:09
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19. Recent estimates predict that between 1982 and 1995 the greatest increase in the number of people employed will be in the category of low-paying service occupations. This category, however, will not increase its share of total employment, whereas the category of high-paying service occupations will increase its share.
If the estimates above are accurate, which of the following conclusions can be drawn?
(A) In 1982 more people were working in low-paying service occupations than were working in high-paying service occupations.
(B) In 1995 more people will be working in high-paying service occupations than will be working in low-paying service occupations.
(C) Nonservice occupations will account for the same share of total employment in 1995 as in 1982.
(D) Many of the people who were working in low-paying service occupations in 1982 will be working in high-paying service occupations by 1995.
(E) The rate of growth for low-paying service occupations will be greater than the overall rate of employment growth between 1982 and 1995.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Nov 2005, 17:06
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Nov 2005, 18:23
A,B - Wrong Inference.
C - Out of scope.
D - Only D is a possible correct answer.
E - Wrong Inference
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Nov 2005, 18:55
I don't see anything wrong with E. If the greatest increase will be in the low pay category that the rate of growth for low payed category will be higher than average rate.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Nov 2005, 18:55
I don't see anything wrong with E. If the greatest increase will be in the low pay category that the rate of growth for low payed category will be higher than average rate.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2005, 06:39
OA is A.

Can someone explain it.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2005, 14:08
I got A, by picking some #s:
1982 1995
Low Pay Service 10 20
High Pay Service 5 14
Other 5 6
Total 20 40

Low pay service sees the greatest increase in number of jobs (delta of 10) and keeps its share of 50%. High pay increases its share from 5/20 to 14/40.

This also nullifies choice E b/c low pay only picked up 10 jobs over the period where as overall employment picked up 20 jobs over the period. The rate of growth for low pay is however greater than high pay and other but is not greater than the overall (total) employment growth rate.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2005, 18:18
Please check the excellent post from Himalaya on this subject
http://www.gmatclub.com/phpbb/viewtopic ... ng+service

Concerning myself I got A by POE

(B) In 1995 more people will be working in high-paying service occupations than will be working in low-paying service occupations.
We just know the share will be bigger , we have no idea about the numbers

(C) Nonservice occupations will account for the same share of total employment in 1995 as in 1982.
We have no data about non-service, out of scope.

(D) Many of the people who were working in low-paying service occupations in 1982 will be working in high-paying service occupations by 1995.
No specific reasons for this. You cant assume that. Even if it was the case you can not prove it with the facts you have now

(E) The rate of growth for low-paying service occupations will be greater than the overall rate of employment growth between 1982 and 1995.
We have absolutely no indication of the overall rate of employment and we can not assume it. We can honnestly think that the rate could be lower because their share is not bigger in 95. But it's not an obligation.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2005, 18:32
This is more like ratio and %age problem in quant :)
generalizing kfranson explanation, the information can be represented as:

in 1982:
let x = number of persons employed in 1982 in low paying jobs
let 100 = total number of employed workers
therefore (100-x) = number of employment in high paying sector (considering there are only two type of employment categories)


in 1995:
total employment becomes 200
x become 2x
high paying jobs = (200 - 2x)

we are given than, the increase in number in low paying jobs > increase in number in high paying jobs

(2x - x) > (200 - 2x) - (100 - x) or
x > (100 - x)
this is what is given in A.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2005, 22:56
Fact 1: Greatest increase in number will be low-paying occupations

Fact 2: Low-paying occupations will not increase its share of total employment

Fact 3: High-paying jobs will increase its share

Let

A = low-paying workers with jobs
B = low-paying worker pool
X = high-paying workers with jobs
Y = high-paying worker pool

Fact 1 and 2 imples a proportional increase of A to B.
Fact 2 and 3 implies X increases faster than Y.

a)
b) Out: Cannot be drawn
c) Out: Cannot be drawn
d) Out: Out of scope
e) Out: Cannot be drawn

Only A can be properly drawn. If more (or a lot more) people were working in low-paying jobs than can Fact 1, Fact 2 and Fact 3 be satisfied.
  [#permalink] 07 Nov 2005, 22:56
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