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Recent psychological studies indicate that if children

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Recent psychological studies indicate that if children [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2008, 11:57
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Recent psychological studies indicate that if children associate with and play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than children that lead relatively isolated lives.

(A) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than

(B) play with other children, they experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than do

(C) played with other children, they experienced fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than will

(D) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop more quickly socially than do

(E) played with other children, they have experienced fewer psychological problems and have developed more quickly socially than do









The OA is D, but I chose B. Would someone please explain the difference between "develop quicker" and "develop more quickly"? My confusion between these 2 led me to the wrong answer. So I will really appreciate it if someone can shed some lights here.

Thanks!
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Re: SC: Comparison [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2008, 12:04
tarek99 wrote:
Recent psychological studies indicate that if children associate with and play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than children that lead relatively isolated lives.

(A) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than

(B) play with other children, they experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than do

(C) played with other children, they experienced fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than will

(D) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop more quickly socially than do

(E) played with other children, they have experienced fewer psychological problems and have developed more quickly socially than do


The OA is D, but I chose B. Would someone please explain the difference between "develop quicker" and "develop more quickly"? My confusion between these 2 led me to the wrong answer. So I will really appreciate it if someone can shed some lights here.

Thanks!


If clause is in present tense so conditional clause needs will + base verb

A & D remain.

In A, the experience and the development are compared to children.

In D, experience and development of children is compared to the same.
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Re: SC: Comparison [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2008, 14:03
icandy wrote:
tarek99 wrote:
Recent psychological studies indicate that if children associate with and play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than children that lead relatively isolated lives.

(A) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than

(B) play with other children, they experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than do

(C) played with other children, they experienced fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than will

(D) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop more quickly socially than do

(E) played with other children, they have experienced fewer psychological problems and have developed more quickly socially than do


The OA is D, but I chose B. Would someone please explain the difference between "develop quicker" and "develop more quickly"? My confusion between these 2 led me to the wrong answer. So I will really appreciate it if someone can shed some lights here.

Thanks!


If clause is in present tense so conditional clause needs will + base verb

A & D remain.

In A, the experience and the development are compared to children.

In D, experience and development of children is compared to the same.



I need to add something to your explanation of the if clause. What you said is correct, but it is not always valid. What you said is true when some sort of decision is involved, this is called real conditional. However, when you are stating a pure fact, you do not need the "will," this is called zero conditional. Let me give you an example:

1) Phosphorus burns if you expose it to the air

As you can see, we haven't used "will" because we are stating a pure fact.


As for the explanation regarding "quicker" or "more quicker", this is what the OE says:


The rule for Comparisons is that the comparison must be of comparable items and must be balanced.
In this case the comparison ‘quicker than’ could only apply to the children.
It would refer to their speed.
This is not the intent of the sentence.
The correct comparison should compare the development of the children.
Therefore the correct comparison should be ‘more quickly than’

However, to me, "more quickly" or "quicker" means the same thing so I'm still lost and can't differentiate their logical meaning. I would need your help in clarifying it!
thanks
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Re: SC: Comparison [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2008, 14:12
tarek99 wrote:
Recent psychological studies indicate that if children associate with and play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than children that lead relatively isolated lives.

(A) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than

(B) play with other children, they experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than do

(C) played with other children, they experienced fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than will

(D) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop more quickly socially than do

(E) played with other children, they have experienced fewer psychological problems and have developed more quickly socially than do









The OA is D, but I chose B. Would someone please explain the difference between "develop quicker" and "develop more quickly"? My confusion between these 2 led me to the wrong answer. So I will really appreciate it if someone can shed some lights here.

Thanks!


"quick" is an adjective, and you use adjective before a noun or you use adjective with the verd "to be". For example, you can say "she is quick" or "it was a quick decision". "Quickly" is an adverb and you use adverb to modify a verb. For example, you have to say "she ran quickly to the store" (not "she ran quick to the store").
The comparison form of "quick" is "quicker", and of "quickly" is "more quickly".
For the question above, because you have the verb "develop", you know for sure that "quickly" must be used (to modify the verb "develop") instead of "quick". And in this case, when you want to use the comparison form of "quickly", you will have to use "develop more quickly".
Hope this helps.
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Re: SC: Comparison [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2008, 14:42
nganle08 wrote:
tarek99 wrote:
Recent psychological studies indicate that if children associate with and play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than children that lead relatively isolated lives.

(A) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than

(B) play with other children, they experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than do

(C) played with other children, they experienced fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than will

(D) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop more quickly socially than do

(E) played with other children, they have experienced fewer psychological problems and have developed more quickly socially than do









The OA is D, but I chose B. Would someone please explain the difference between "develop quicker" and "develop more quickly"? My confusion between these 2 led me to the wrong answer. So I will really appreciate it if someone can shed some lights here.

Thanks!


"quick" is an adjective, and you use adjective before a noun or you use adjective with the verd "to be". For example, you can say "she is quick" or "it was a quick decision". "Quickly" is an adverb and you use adverb to modify a verb. For example, you have to say "she ran quickly to the store" (not "she ran quick to the store").
The comparison form of "quick" is "quicker", and of "quickly" is "more quickly".
For the question above, because you have the verb "develop", you know for sure that "quickly" must be used (to modify the verb "develop") instead of "quick". And in this case, when you want to use the comparison form of "quickly", you will have to use "develop more quickly".
Hope this helps.



beautiful! you've nailed my issue exactly on the right spot. Now I understand it perfectly well.
thanks a lot! I really appreciate it :-D
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Re: SC: Comparison [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2008, 14:50
tarek99 wrote:
nganle08 wrote:
tarek99 wrote:
Recent psychological studies indicate that if children associate with and play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than children that lead relatively isolated lives.

(A) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than

(B) play with other children, they experience fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than do

(C) played with other children, they experienced fewer psychological problems and develop quicker socially than will

(D) play with other children, they will experience fewer psychological problems and develop more quickly socially than do

(E) played with other children, they have experienced fewer psychological problems and have developed more quickly socially than do









The OA is D, but I chose B. Would someone please explain the difference between "develop quicker" and "develop more quickly"? My confusion between these 2 led me to the wrong answer. So I will really appreciate it if someone can shed some lights here.

Thanks!


"quick" is an adjective, and you use adjective before a noun or you use adjective with the verd "to be". For example, you can say "she is quick" or "it was a quick decision". "Quickly" is an adverb and you use adverb to modify a verb. For example, you have to say "she ran quickly to the store" (not "she ran quick to the store").
The comparison form of "quick" is "quicker", and of "quickly" is "more quickly".
For the question above, because you have the verb "develop", you know for sure that "quickly" must be used (to modify the verb "develop") instead of "quick". And in this case, when you want to use the comparison form of "quickly", you will have to use "develop more quickly".
Hope this helps.



beautiful! you've nailed my issue exactly on the right spot. Now I understand it perfectly well.
thanks a lot! I really appreciate it :-D


You are welcome. I am happy that I can be of some help.
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Re: SC: Comparison [#permalink] New post 28 Oct 2008, 01:21
no, don't get me wrong. I'm not saying that the above problem is not a real conditional. It is a real conditional because children have to take some sort of decision before the result happens. What I meant from my given example was to show that zero conditionals, or just pure fact, do exist as well. When a statement of fact, which doesn't require the use of "will", shows up on a question, you do not need to include the "will." That was all my point. Hope I didn't cause any confusion here.
regards,
Re: SC: Comparison   [#permalink] 28 Oct 2008, 01:21
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