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Relationship to recommeder-Pls help!!!

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Relationship to recommeder-Pls help!!! [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2006, 12:46
I need your help, guys!
I have a senior colleague in office who was not my manager, but has observed my work just as well, if not more.
What do I adress him as, in the space where I have to write 'Relationship to you'.
I would have loved to write 'Manager', but I already sent a request to my actual supervisor and have written 'Manager' in the 'Relationship to you' column.
Pls help as I dont want to write 'peer' (dont want the adcom to think I could get a peer to write anything I want).

Thanks!
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how 'bout [#permalink] New post 10 Dec 2006, 17:52
Internal customer?

Cheers. L.
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Re: how 'bout [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 00:07
lepium wrote:
Internal customer?

Cheers. L.


I have no idea what that means, but I'm pretty sure you shouldn't say that.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 00:25
I will go with 'Senior Colleague' if I dont hear from anyone by eod.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 02:24
How about "Indirect Manager" ?
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 08:03
I would just put down Manger.

Most rec letters ask the recommender what his or her relationship is to you.

Just tell him to say he's a manager in another department that knows your work.
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Re: how 'bout [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 14:27
pelihu wrote:
lepium wrote:
Internal customer?

Cheers. L.


I have no idea what that means, but I'm pretty sure you shouldn't say that.


Try these links:

http://www.isrsurveys.com/solutions/int ... tomer.aspx
http://www.dmreview.com/article_sub.cfm?articleId=4213

IMHO, just because you have not heard of it, does not mean it should not be used. Actually, as long as you do not misuse the term, you may sound original.

Cheers. L.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 15:13
I looked at those links and I'm even more convinced that it would be a seriously bad idea to use that term. It's not going to make you sound original, it's going to make you sound like a moron. That's just my assessment based on the common vernacular. From what I have seen, Adcoms still use normal language just like everyone else. It's pretty simple, if someone has to look it up to understand what you are saying, don't use it; otherwise you will sound like a moron.
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I agree - sort of [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 15:23
Pelihu,

I agree that if you are using industry-specific jargon you may sound like a moron, and most importantly, your message will not get through.

However, if you are using a term that is not industry - specific, just "business specific", then it may not be that bad.

Anyway, I do not work nor live in the US, so I'm sure you would be in a better position to estimate what the average Adcom will or will not understand.

Cheers. L.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 15:35
Lepium, we both agree that industry specific jargon is bad. I'm pretty sure that this is term is not a commonly use general business term though. As far as I can tell it's something that a marketing type dreamed up to sell something. I think that, bankers for example, would chuckle derisively if they were told to better serve their internal customers. There was a post a little while back that suggested non-native speakers be very careful when using a dictionary & thesaurus to spice up their applications. It can turn out badly.

I would encourage people to drop all industry specific jargon for their applications. Just for example, if an IT type decided to describe his career progress by using a lot of industry specific terms, and the application was reviewed by a non-IT type, the reader would be bored to tears and likely send the application straight to the circular file. The experience might be really impressive, but it's not going to do you any good if people cannot read it without falling asleep.

Personally, I'm really careful when I use any legal terminology. It's impossible to avoid completely when talking about law school and practicing law, but I always step back to make sure that normal people can understand what I'm saying anytime I use industry specific terminology.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 16:55
pelihu,
"Internal customer" is a common business term. It gets about half a million matches on Google.
The term "internal customer" is frequently used in micro-economics, accounting, management, and operations. If you haven't heard this term, it only means that you haven't been practicing management at all.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 17:46
Tyr wrote:
The term "internal customer" is frequently used in micro-economics, accounting, management, and operations.


Funny, this seems to be a great example of jargon.
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[#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 18:10
pelihu wrote:
There was a post a little while back that suggested non-native speakers be very careful when using a dictionary & thesaurus to spice up their applications.


This is bordering on disrespectful. How can I come up with a term like "internal customer" from a thesaurus? I've shown you through a couple of links (and Tyr has added some Google stats to complement the information I provided) that "internal customer" is an English term and not a meaningless literal translation.

I accept, however, that while it is common jargon in several (not just one)businesses or industries, it may not be so for all (eg: bankers you mentioned).

Cheers. L.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 18:15
pelihu wrote:
Funny, this seems to be a great example of jargon.


The terms "stakeholder", "sponsor", "champion", VOC (Voice of customer), ICA (interim containment action), SIT (structured invertive thinking), KTS (knowledge-transfer sessions), NGT (nominal group technique), CRM (customer relationship management), CODND (cost of doing nothing different), CTC (critical to cost), SME (subject matter experts), DSO (days sales outstanding), DR/FR (functional/design requirement) are great examples of jargon.
"Internal customer" is not.
You are writing a application for business school admissions, and not for a retard faction.
There is nothing wrong with talking about your "change management" skills and using "internal customers" as an example. In fact, admissions will be looking for a similar demonstration of your general management aptitude.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 19:14
Tyr wrote:
In fact, admissions will be looking for a similar demonstration of your general management aptitude.


If you actually believe this statement, then all I can say is good luck.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 19:25
pelihu wrote:
If you actually believe this statement, then all I can say is good luck.


And if you don't, you should seriously reconsider going to a business school at all.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 19:39
Ceasefire.

Dissent is welcomed wholeheartedly but this conversation is starting to sound rather mean-spirited.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 19:44
I second that. We don't want to emulate businessweek here. Please be respectful.


Hjort wrote:
Ceasefire.

Dissent is welcomed wholeheartedly but this conversation is starting to sound rather mean-spirited.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 19:46
I'm actually quite certain that I can demonstrate business aptitude without using jargon. I'm also quite confident that I have an elite understanding of the English vernacular and how it is used in a business setting.

In addition to drafting briefs for circuit courts (the highest level below the Supreme Court), I have worked closely VPs and directors at Investment Banks and also survived 4 rounds of interviews and secured an offer from McKinsey & Co. 5 years ago (I passed and took a job on Wall Street instead). I also started a business from scratch that now does over 3 million dollars a year in sales and I negotiate regularly in English & Chinese with factories, vendors & customers all over the world. I also have an A on my transcript from an elite level MBA program (Michigan), which at the very least proves I know what it takes to succeed in business school.

I understand language as it used in business. I also have a good idea of what Adcoms are looking for in admissions essays.

But, nobody needs to listen to me. I'm just stating my opinion that using jargon in an application essay is not displaying business aptitude; quite the opposite it shows the lack of ability to communicate effectively without resorting to jargon. But that's just my opinion. To anyone that wants to ignore that, I'll say it again, good luck.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Dec 2006, 19:47
Hjort wrote:
Ceasefire.

Dissent is welcomed wholeheartedly but this conversation is starting to sound rather mean-spirited.


Sorry, I was already writing my message when you posted this.
  [#permalink] 11 Dec 2006, 19:47
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