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Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants

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Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2013, 12:27
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Question Stats:

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Which of the following most logically completes the passage?

Higher rates of respiratory problems in Clark have been linked to the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant. In response to these new findings, the city imposed regulations on the Lauriel plant, requiring it to reduce emissions by half in two years’ time. While Lauriel has no problem meeting these new emission levels, it is unlikely that the rate of respiratory problems two years from now will be reduced since ______.

(A) the number of facilities capable of treating respiratory ailments is not likely to increase
(B) reducing emissions even further than suggested through regulation would necessitate decreasing production at Lauriel
(C) it is difficult to make accurate, long-term predictions about emissions
(D) not all respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants
(E) two new cosmetic manufacturing plants are about to go into production in Clark

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[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by GMATPill on 11 Aug 2013, 07:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2013, 14:48
GMATPill wrote:
Which of the following most logically completes the passage?

Higher rates of respiratory problems in Clark have been linked to the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant. In response to these new findings, the city imposed regulations on the Lauriel plant, requiring it to reduce emissions by half in two years’ time. While Lauriel has no problem meeting these new emission levels, it is unlikely that the rate of respiratory problems two years from now will be reduced since ______.

(A) the number of facilities capable of treating respiratory ailments is not likely to increase
(B) reducing emissions even further than suggested through regulation would necessitate decreasing production at Lauriel
(C) it is difficult to make accurate, long-term predictions about emissions
(D) not all respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants
(E) two new cosmetic manufacturing plants are about to go into production in Clark


The answer is E as it clearly identifies why imposing limits on Lauriel plant will not work. The limit should be applied in general. here its specific.
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2013, 20:52
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Tricky..

Both D & E qualify

D provides an alternate cause for respiratory problems still existing after two years inspite of the ban & E also provides the same.

However, both can be argued to be out of scope.

Premise states that respiratory problems in Clark are linked to the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant.

Hence D can be out of scope because it traces source of air pollutants beyond cosmetic manufacturing plants & E can be out of scope as it traces source of air pollutants beyond specifically Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant.


Look forward to clarity on this.


Regards

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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2013, 21:25
Bluelagoon wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Which of the following most logically completes the passage?

Higher rates of respiratory problems in Clark have been linked to the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant. In response to these new findings, the city imposed regulations on the Lauriel plant, requiring it to reduce emissions by half in two years’ time. While Lauriel has no problem meeting these new emission levels, it is unlikely that the rate of respiratory problems two years from now will be reduced since ______.

(A) the number of facilities capable of treating respiratory ailments is not likely to increase
(B) reducing emissions even further than suggested through regulation would necessitate decreasing production at Lauriel
(C) it is difficult to make accurate, long-term predictions about emissions
(D) not all respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants
(E) two new cosmetic manufacturing plants are about to go into production in Clark


The answer is E as it clearly identifies why imposing limits on Lauriel plant will not work. The limit should be applied in general. here its specific.


Why E... There is no guarantee that these two new cosmetic manufacturing plants will produce pollution... They might use some different process...
IMO D..
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2013, 13:21
jaituteja wrote:
Bluelagoon wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Which of the following most logically completes the passage?

Higher rates of respiratory problems in Clark have been linked to the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant. In response to these new findings, the city imposed regulations on the Lauriel plant, requiring it to reduce emissions by half in two years’ time. While Lauriel has no problem meeting these new emission levels, it is unlikely that the rate of respiratory problems two years from now will be reduced since ______.

(A) the number of facilities capable of treating respiratory ailments is not likely to increase
(B) reducing emissions even further than suggested through regulation would necessitate decreasing production at Lauriel
(C) it is difficult to make accurate, long-term predictions about emissions
(D) not all respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants
(E) two new cosmetic manufacturing plants are about to go into production in Clark


The answer is E as it clearly identifies why imposing limits on Lauriel plant will not work. The limit should be applied in general. here its specific.


Why E... There is no guarantee that these two new cosmetic manufacturing plants will produce pollution... They might use some different process...
IMO D..


Though E is OA, I don't get why D is not correct. Anyone please help with the explanation. Thanks!
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2013, 22:32
About D, yes, It is a good choice but E is Better.

If you go with D, you are trying to question the impact of the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant.
You are trying to deny the first sentence as it clearly says that airborne pollutants are linked with respiratory problems.
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2013, 07:39
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Yes, that's a good point.

In terms of frameworks, here's how we think about it at GMAT PILL:

A leads to B

[Lauriel plant emissions] leads to [respiratory problems]

The passages suggests that emissions will go down.

So given that (A --> B), if we reduce/remove A - then one might think that B disappears.

If we reduce emissions, one might think that respiratory problems will disappear.

But the author says that will UNLIKELY happen because.... why?

Because something else OTHER than A (let's call it C) will lead to B.

If we have something else that leads to respiratory problems, then removing Lauriel emissions will not necessarily solve the respiratory problem.

That's exactly what (E) says.

(E) says that 2 NEW plants will come on - and that will lead to respiratory problems.

So even if we remove the original Lauriel emissions, those 2 new plants will still lead to respiratory problems.

So this is an example of the Linked Chains Frameworks between A, B, and C.

A leads to B.

Negate it and you might expect that:

(Without A) --> there will be no B.

But actually, if something else C leads to B, then removing A will not necessarily lead to no B.

Because C will still lead to B.

Does that make sense?

You can learn more about Linked Chains in the Critical Reasoning Pill Frameworks.

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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2013, 09:09
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@GMATPill

Can we not consider
Lauriel cosmetic --> airborne pollutants -->Higher rates of respiratory problems

A --> B --> C

But looking at option D; [not all respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants]

C can be caused by D.
D --> C

Please explain. (Options are too close. )
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2013, 06:23
GMATPill wrote:
Yes, that's a good point.

In terms of frameworks, here's how we think about it at GMAT PILL:

A leads to B

[Lauriel plant emissions] leads to [respiratory problems]

The passages suggests that emissions will go down.

So given that (A --> B), if we reduce/remove A - then one might think that B disappears.

If we reduce emissions, one might think that respiratory problems will disappear.

But the author says that will UNLIKELY happen because.... why?

Because something else OTHER than A (let's call it C) will lead to B.


If we have something else that leads to respiratory problems, then removing Lauriel emissions will not necessarily solve the respiratory problem.

That's exactly what (E) says.

(E) says that 2 NEW plants will come on - and that will lead to respiratory problems.

So even if we remove the original Lauriel emissions, those 2 new plants will still lead to respiratory problems.

So this is an example of the Linked Chains Frameworks between A, B, and C.

A leads to B.

Negate it and you might expect that:

(Without A) --> there will be no B.

But actually, if something else C leads to B, then removing A will not necessarily lead to no B.

Because C will still lead to B.

Does that make sense?

You can learn more about Linked Chains in the Critical Reasoning Pill Frameworks.

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Can you not even see for yourself that something else that leads to b is perfectly addressed in option D?
I dont get the point why you are developing such amibigous questions at the CR part.

Most of the CR questions you develop are just slightly changed questions from the OG.
While you are doing decent things at other domains, your CR part is just awful.

You are not doing anyone a favour with posting these types of CR questions, as CR questions at test day will be very subtle, and answer choices above all will be clearly structured.
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 18 Nov 2013, 11:35
For me its D. There is no certainty that new plants will also add up the pollution.
But having an alternate reason for existing pollution levels would mean shutting down plant may not have intended outcome.
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 18 Nov 2013, 18:26
waltiebikkiebal wrote:
GMATPill wrote:

If we have something else that leads to respiratory problems, then removing Lauriel emissions will not necessarily solve the respiratory problem.

That's exactly what (E) says.

(E) says that 2 NEW plants will come on - and that will lead to respiratory problems.



E does not explicitly state that the two new cosmetic manufacturing plants lead to respiratory problems by releasing airborne pollutants, not does the passage state so. According to the passage,

"Higher rates of respiratory problems in Clark have been linked to the airborne pollutants being released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant"

The respiratory problems are linked to pollutants released fro Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant only. Are we not generalizing this statement to all cosmetic manufacturing plants to arrive at our answer? It could be true that it is only Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant releases airborne pollutants and all other plants already follow strict norms and are likely to incorporate the same in their two new plants as well.
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Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants [#permalink] New post 18 Nov 2013, 18:33
ygdrasil24 wrote:
For me its D. There is no certainty that new plants will also add up the pollution.
But having an alternate reason for existing pollution levels would mean shutting down plant may not have intended outcome.


Similarly, even D appears debatable.

It says "not all" respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants. Even if this were true, not all just means, not 100%. It could be anything from 0% to 99.9%. Let's say 60%. If 60% of respiratory ailments are caused by airborne pollutants which are in turn released from the Lauriel cosmetic manufacturing plant, it is no more an explanation why the rate of respiratory problems will not reduce over the next two years if the emissions are reduced.
Re: Respiratory Problems and Cosmetic Manufacturing Plants   [#permalink] 18 Nov 2013, 18:33
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